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Summer University

Courses

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Campus

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ANTHROPOLOGY

Thinking through Pain

Despite being a common experience, pain remains a mystery for both medicine and the humanities. Can it be described? Measured? Eliminated? Is it the same for everyone? This course explores some of the ways in which pain is represented, interpreted and addressed in contemporary clinical and social settings, combining ethnographic and testimonial literature with fiction and film to illuminate key ethical and political issues at stake in defining and treating pain.

Course Number: AS.070.138.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Patricia Madariaga Villegas

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1:00 - 3:30PM

T - 1:00 - 3:30PM

R - 1:00 - 3:30PM

Discover Hopkins: What is Scientific Experimentation?

How do scientists design and conduct experiments? In what ways do experimental results advance our understanding of scientific theories? In this introductory course, we will discuss how experimentation contributes to scientific knowledge making. Reading a number of key articles, we will explore the ways in which an experimental model is developed in behavioral neuroscience. We will discuss how neurobiologists interpret psychological concepts and theories by drawing on animal experimentation.

Course Number: AS.070.264.41

Term: Discover Hopkins I

Dates: June 22 - July 2

Instructor: Bican Polat

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

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APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS

Discrete Mathematics

Introduction to the mathematics of finite systems. Logic; Boolean algebra; induction and recursion; sets, functions, relations, equivalence, and partially ordered sets; elementary combinatorics; modular arithmetic and the Euclidean algorithm; group theory; permutations and symmetry groups; graph theory. Selected applications. The concept of a proof and development of the ability to recognize and construct proofs are part of the course. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics

Course Number: EN.550.171.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Brendan McLear

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Introduction to Biostatistics

A self-contained course covering various data analysis methods used in the life sciences. Topics include types of experimental data, numerical and graphical descriptive statistics, concepts of (and distinctions between) population and sample, basic probability, fitting curves to experimental data (regression analysis), comparing groups in populations (analysis of variance), methods of modeling probability (contingency tables and logistic regression). * Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics. * Prerequisites: 3 years of high school mathematics

Course Number: EN.550.230.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Karla Hernandez

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

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ART

Design Studies: Art of Architecture

In this course, students will learn to design, draw, and see like an architect. A series of progressive design exercises will teach the practical capacities and habits of mind that lead not merely to competence but success and advancement in the field. We will look at what architecture has been, discuss what it is becoming, and explore both formal and narrative methodologies for design. The class will use the built environment of the city - and the Homewood campus - as a classroom and a site for interpretive drawing and creative design work. Essential in the architect's education is the sketchbook, which functions not merely as a place to 'store' what has been witnessed, but a place to interpret and explore implications of design in the world, whether close to home or traveling in exotic locales.

Course Number: AS.371.147.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Charles Phinney

Campus:

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 5:30 - 8:30 PM

W - 5:30 - 8:30 PM

R - 5:30 - 8:30 PM

Landscape Photography

Class begins: Monday, July 6th. In this course students will experience the drama and beauty of the urban and rural landscape. On numerous field trips they will hone their camera technique as well as learn elements of composition and develop a personal style. Students will learn the fundamentals of Photoshop and they will also be introduced to the beauty of black and white in Silver Efex software.

Course Number: AS.371.166.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Phyllis Berger

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9:20AM-12:30PM

W - 9:20AM-12:30PM

R - 9:20AM-12:30PM

Color Explorations & Theory

Course begins on June 30th. We will explore the physical characteristics, psychological effects and basic physics of color through exercises in various applications. Primary mediums include: Paint, Color-Aid Paper & Photoshop. Emphasis is placed on the investigation of color effects used in applied and fine arts.

Course Number: AS.371.171.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Clarissa Gregory

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 10AM-12:30 PM

T - 10AM-12:30 PM

R - 10AM-12:30 PM

Drawing Outside the Box

We will explore essential principles, tools, terminology & media, while pushing the boundaries of "traditional drawing" by adopting alternatives such as drawing with wire, inking with grass, and animating gesture in Photoshop. Not only will we draw from observation, which builds the perceptual platform and skills for spatial understanding and rendering, we will draw from intuition, movement, and outdoor stimuli. Subject matter may include: still life, interiors, landscape, architecture, the human figure and personal narrative. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.371.201.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Clarissa Gregory

Campus:

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

T - 10AM - 12:30 PM

R - 10AM-12:30 PM

Documentary Photography

Course will begin on Monday, July 6th. In this hands-on course, we will explore different genres of documentary photography, including the fine art document, photojournalism, social documentary photography, the photo essay and photography of propaganda. Students will work on a semester-long photo-documentary project on a subject of their choice. Digital SLRs will be provided. First class is mandatory.

Course Number: AS.371.303.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Phyllis Berger

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 5:30 PM

W - 2 - 5:30 PM

R - 2 - 5:30 PM

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BIOLOGY

Discover Hopkins: Introduction to Laboratory Research

This course will introduce students to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, students will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects. * Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry

Course Number: AS.020.120.41

Term: Discover Hopkins I

Dates: June 22 - July 2

Instructor: Shekerah Primus & Erin Jimenez

Campus:

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-4:30PM

T - 9:30-4:30PM

W - 9:30-4:30PM

R - 9:30-4:30PM

F - 9:30-4:30PM

Discover Hopkins: Introduction to Laboratory Research

This course will introduce students to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, students will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects. * Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry

Course Number: AS.020.120.43

Term: Discover Hopkins I

Dates: June 22 - July 2

Instructor: Jaime Sorenson

Campus:

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-4:30PM

T - 9:30-4:30PM

W - 9:30-4:30PM

R - 9:30-4:30PM

F - 9:30-4:30PM

Discover Hopkins: Introduction to Laboratory Research

This course will introduce students to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, students will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects. * Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry

Course Number: AS.020.120.51

Term: Discover Hopkins II

Dates: July 6 - July 17

Instructor: Shekerah Primus & Erin Jimenez

Campus:

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-4:30PM

T - 9:30-4:30PM

W - 9:30-4:30PM

R - 9:30-4:30PM

F - 9:30-4:30PM

Discover Hopkins: Introduction to Laboratory Research

This course will introduce students to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, students will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects. * Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry

Course Number: AS.020.120.53

Term: Discover Hopkins II

Dates: July 6 - July 17

Instructor: Jaime Sorenson

Campus:

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-3:30PM

T - 9:30-3:30PM

W - 9:30-3:30PM

R - 9:30-3:30PM

F - 9:30-3:30PM

Discover Hopkins: Introduction to Laboratory Research

This course will introduce students to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, students will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects. * Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry

Course Number: AS.020.120.61

Term: Discover Hopkins III

Dates: July 20 - July 31

Instructor: Shekerah Primus & Erin Jimenez

Campus:

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-4:30PM

T - 9:30-4:30PM

W - 9:30-4:30PM

R - 9:30-4:30PM

F - 9:30-4:30PM

Discover Hopkins: Introduction to Laboratory Research

This course will introduce students to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, students will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects. * Prerequisites: High school biology and chemistry

Course Number: AS.020.120.63

Term: Discover Hopkins III

Dates: July 20 - July 31

Instructor: Jaime Sorenson

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-4:30PM

T - 9:30-4:30PM

W - 9:30-4:30PM

R - 9:30-4:30PM

F - 9:30-4:30PM

Introduction to Laboratory Research

This class will meet from June 29 - July 10. This is an exciting time to work in biotechnology research. The Human Genome Project is generating fundamental genetic information at a breathtaking rate. Basic research findings are being applied to medicine, agriculture, and the environment; and a variety of new biotechnology products are moving into production. Behind each of these accomplishments lies extensive laboratory research. In this class, students will explore a variety of experimental techniques and evaluate their roles in modern biotechnology research.

Course Number: AS.020.120.79

Term: Non-Homewood 2-week, Special Term

Dates: June 29 - July 10

Instructor: Larissa Diaz

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 2

Days & Times:

M - 10:45am-1:45pm

T - 10:45am-1:45pm

W - 10:45am-1:45pm

R - 10:45am-1:45pm

F - 10:45am-1:45pm

Mini-Term: Techniques in Molecular Biology

This course is designed to supplement the scientific classroom experience of students by providing hands on experience with the essential core molecular biology techniques of bacterial DNA cloning, DNA analysis, and protein analysis. Students will be able to understand and explain how these methodologies work scientifically and will develop the basic laboratory skills necessary for the successful completion of the assays. * Prerequisites: Solid background in biology

Course Number: AS.020.126.72

Term: Summer University Mini-Term II

Dates: July 6 - July 17

Instructor: James Gordy

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 4:00-6:00PM

T - 4:00-6:00PM

W - 4:00-6:00PM

R - 4:00-6:00PM

F - 4:00-6:00PM

MCC: Concepts in Cancer Research I: Pre-Diagnosis

This course will introduce current topics in cancer research with a focus on the current state of knowledge regarding pre-diagnosis concepts in cancer research. We will first provide students with the context in which to interpret the latest findings in cancer research by giving a brief overview of cancer biology and descriptive epidemiology of the most common cancers in the United States. We will then discuss the current state of knowledge regarding cancer etiology and primary prevention strategies, providing specific examples from research currently being conducted at the National Cancer Institute along with other emerging research in the field of cancer prevention. Finally, we will introduce students to concepts and research in cancer screening. We will employ multiple formats to promote student learning and to introduce different tools for research. These may include lectures, case studies, in-class discussions, online discussions, and select film and internet resources. Active p

Course Number: AS.020.127.77

Term: Non-Homewood 2-week, Term 2

Dates: July 6 - July 17

Instructor: Sarah Nash & Minal Patel

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:00-10:30am

T - 9:00-10:30am

W - 9:00-10:30am

R - 9:00-10:30am

F - 9:00-10:30am

MCC: Concepts Cancer Research II:Diagnosis through Recovery

This course will introduce current topics in cancer research with a focus on "life after cancer," including research questions about medical and psychosocial issues at diagnosis, during treatment and throughout recovery for patients that have been diagnosed with cancer. Health recommendations for cancer survivors will be discussed. Throughout the course, we will hear from researchers at the National Cancer Institute (and other research entities) who represent a variety of disciplines, applied in many settings (e.g., laboratory, clinics and communities). We will also use multi-media to promote active learning and to introduce tools for research. These may include lectures, case studies, in-class discussion, online discussion, and select film (including clips from the recent PBS documentary "Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies") and internet resources. Active participation and peer learning will enhance the value of this course for students.

Course Number: AS.020.128.78

Term: Non-Homewood 2-week, Term 3

Dates: July 20 - July 31

Instructor: Shirley Bluethmann

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:00-10:30am

T - 9:00-10:30am

W - 9:00-10:30am

R - 9:00-10:30am

F - 9:00-10:30am

Introduction to Biological Molecules

Prerequisite: High school level Chemistry and Biology (both with a grade of A). This course presents an overview to biochemistry and molecular biology, especially focusing on biotechnology and medicine. Students will have classroom and laboratory experience and group presentations. * Prerequisites: High School Biology and Chemistry (Both with a grade of A ).

Course Number: AS.020.205.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Richard Shingles

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9AM - 12PM LAB

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

Introduction to Biological Molecules

Prerequisite: High school level Chemistry and Biology (both with a grade of A). This course presents an overview to biochemistry and molecular biology, especially focusing on biotechnology and medicine. Students will have classroom and laboratory experience and group presentations. * Prerequisites: High School Biology and Chemistry (Both with a grade of A ).

Course Number: AS.020.205.22

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Richard Shingles

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM LAB

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

Introduction to Immunology

This course is designed to introduce students to the cells, major receptors and signals critical for understanding more advanced concepts in immunology. They should leave with a basic understanding of the players and events leading to an effective immune defense against pathogens. They should also begin to recognize disease consequences of certain immune malfunctions. * Prerequisites: Biology

Course Number: AS.020.229.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Abby Geis

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 2

Days & Times:

M - 10 - 11:45 AM

W - 10 - 11:45 AM

R - 10 - 11:45 AM

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CHEMISTRY

Introductory Chemistry I

The fundamental principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, elementary thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, kinetics, and transition metal chemistry are introduced in this course. To be taken with Introductory Chemistry Laboratory unless lab has been previously completed. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. High school physics and calculus are strongly recommended as prerequisites. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: Pre-College requires instructor permission.

Course Number: AS.030.101.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Sunita Thyagarajan

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11 AM

T - 9 - 11 AM

R - 9 - 11 AM

F - 9 - 11 AM

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I

Laboratory work includes some quantitative analysis and the measurement of physical properties. Open only to those who are registered for or have successfully completed Introductory Chemistry 030.101. * Prerequisites: Pre-College requires instructor permission, 030.101 co-requisite or prerequisite

Course Number: AS.030.105.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Louise Pasternack

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 4 PM

T - 1 - 4 PM

R - 1 - 4 PM

F - 1 - 4 PM

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COGNITIVE SCIENCE

Mini-Term I: Theory of Mind and the Development of Language

The course offers an overview of recent research on language and social cognition. It focuses on Theory of Mind (ToM) and the development of language. Theory of Mind is the ability to attribute mental states to oneself and others and to understand that others have beliefs, desires, and intentions that are different from one's own. The development of human language is closely related to the development of Theory of Mind.

Course Number: AS.050.235.71

Term: Summer University Mini-Term I

Dates: June 22 - July 2

Instructor: Anne Tamm

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 12:30-2:30PM

T - 12:30-2:30PM

W - 12:30-2:30PM

R - 12:30-2:30PM

F - 12:30-2:30PM

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

Introduction to Programming in Java

This course introduces the fundamental programming concepts and techniques in Java and is intended for all who plan to use computer programming in their studies and careers. Topics covered include control structures, arrays, functions, recursion, dynamic memory allocation, simple data structures, files, and structured program design. Elements of object-oriented design and programming are also introduced. Course homework involves significant programming. Attendance and participation are expected. * Prerequisites: Familiarity using computers.

Course Number: EN.600.107.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Sara More

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:30AM-12PM

T - 9:30AM-12PM

R - 9:30AM-12PM

F - 9:30AM-12PM

Intro Programming for Science & Engr

An introductory "learning by doing" programming course for scientists, engineers, and everybody else who will need basic programming skills in their studies and careers. We cover the fundamentals of structured, modular, and (to some extent) object-oriented programming as well as important design principles and software development techniques. We will apply our shiny new programming skills by developing computational solutions in the Python programming language to a number of real-world problems from a variety of disciplines. This course may not be used for the CS major or minor requirements, except as a substitute for 600.107. Students will be expected to do significant programming (15-20 hours/wk). Attendance and participation is required. * Prerequisites: Familiarity with using computers.

Course Number: EN.600.112.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Joanne Selinski

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:30am-12pm

T - 9:30am-12pm

R - 9:30am-12pm

F - 9:30am-12pm

Intermediate Programming

This course teaches intermediate to advanced programming, using C and C++. (Prior knowledge of these languages is not expected.) We will cover low-level programming techniques, as well as object-oriented class design, and the use of class libraries. Specific topics include pointers, dynamic memory allocation, polymorphism, overloading, inheritance, templates, collections, exceptions, and others as time permits. Students are expected to learn syntax and some language specific features independently. Course work involves significant programming projects in both languages. * Prerequisites: 600.107 or 600.112 or AP Computer Science.

Course Number: EN.600.120.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Peter Froehlich

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

Data Structures

This course covers the design and implementation of data structures including arrays, stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, heaps, balanced trees (e.g. 2-3 trees, AVL-trees) and graphs. Other topics include sorting, hashing, memory allocation, and garbage collection. Course work involves both written homework and Java programming assignments. * Prerequisites: 600.107: Intro to Programming, AP CS or equivalent; Discrete Math recommended

Course Number: EN.600.226.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Anwar Mamat

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 3-5:30pm

T - 3-5:30pm

R - 3-5:30pm

F - 3-5:30pm

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E.S.L.

Pre-College ESL

Sharpen and refine your speaking, reading, listening, and writing skills, or improve your test scores. A separate application is required. Please contact 410-516-4548 for information or write summer@jhu.edu. * Prerequisites: Permission. Please contact 410-516-4548.

Course Number: AS.360.000.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Jessica Madrigal

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

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EAST ASIAN STUDIES

Politics of East Asia

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

Course Number: AS.190.109.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Erin Chung

Campus:

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 10AM - 12:45PM

W - 10AM - 12:45PM

F - 10AM - 12:45PM

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ECONOMICS

Elements of Macroeconomics

This course introduces the basic tools of macroeconomics and teaches how they are applied to real world economic policy. Throughout the course, the main goals will be to a) study economic aggregates such as the overall price level; the unemployment rate and the GDP b)understand how they relate to each other. Attention will be given to fiscal and monetary policies. We will also analyze the recent financial crisis and its impact on the economic activity.

Course Number: AS.180.101.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Sevcan Yesiltas

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

Elements of Macroeconomics

This course introduces the basic tools of macroeconomics and teaches how they are applied to real world economic policy. Throughout the course, the main goals will be to a) study economic aggregates such as the overall price level; the unemployment rate and the GDP b)understand how they relate to each other. Attention will be given to fiscal and monetary policies. We will also analyze the recent financial crisis and its impact on the economic activity.

Course Number: AS.180.101.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Burcin Kisacikoglu

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Elements of Microeconomics

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems. * Prerequisites: Basic algebra and ability to read and draw graphs.

Course Number: AS.180.102.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Mingjian Wang

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Elements of Microeconomics

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.  * Prerequisites: Student should be comfortable with basic algebra & graphs

Course Number: AS.180.102.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Daniel Garcia Molina

Campus:

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

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ENGLISH

James Joyce's Ulysses

Ulysses is often described as impossible to read (it isn't) and as the greatest novel in the English language (it just might be). A monumental book set in a single day, Ulysses seems to have it all: a panoply of literary styles, religions, philosophies, histories, emotions, and even a wide variety of bodily functions. In addition to offering an up-close look at the novel itself, this course examines the novel's use of mythology, meditations on Irishness, reflections on capitalism, and its place in "modernism." By the end of the course, not only will you have read the famously difficult and important Ulysses; you will have understood it, too.

Course Number: AS.060.159.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Robert Day

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Friends and Enemies in Jane Austen

Jane Austen’s novels are often treated as forms of escape from our complicated world to a simpler, more rational time. Arguably, however, her novels originally helped readers navigate profound social problems, particularly the difficulty of knowing friends from enemies. In this course, we will consider depictions of friendship and enmity in four of Austen’s major novels. We will compare these novels to four recent films inspired by her works.

Course Number: AS.060.206.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: William Miller

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 10AM- 12:30 PM

W - 10AM - 12:30 PM

R - 10AM-12:30 PM

The Antihero: Heathcliff to Walter White

Although it’s common to think of literature a source of ethical wisdom, literary history is actually full of proud, often cynical, figures who lack respect for conventional norms and compel attention by their sheer force of will. This course constructs an abbreviated history of the anti-hero by exploring works of art that both privilege and criticize anti-heroic villains—including Heathcliff (from Wuthering Heights), Mr. Hyde (from Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde), and Walter White (from Breaking Bad).

Course Number: AS.060.229.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Matthew Flaherty

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 4 - 6:30 PM

W - 4 - 6:30 PM

F - 4 - 6:30 PM

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP & MANAGEMENT

Introduction to Business

This course is designed as an introduction to the terms, concepts, and values of business and management. The course comprises three broad categories: the economic, financial, and corporate context of business activities; the organization and management of business enterprises; and, the marketing and production of goods and services. Topic specific readings, short case studies and financial exercises all focus on the bases for managerial decisions as well as the long and short-term implications of those decisions in a global environment. No audits.

Course Number: EN.660.105.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Lawrence Aronhime

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:45 AM

T - 9 - 11:45 AM

W - 9 - 11:45 AM

R - 9 - 11:45 AM

Financial Accounting

The course in Financial Accounting is designed for anyone who could be called upon to analyze and/or communicate financial results and/or make effective financial decisions in a for-profit business setting. No prior accounting knowledge or skill is required for successful completion of this course. Because accounting is described as the language of business, this course emphasizes the vocabulary, methods, and processes by which all business transactions are communicated. The accounting cycle, basic business transactions, internal controls, and preparation and understanding of financial statements including balance sheets, statements of income and cash flows are covered. No audits.

Course Number: EN.660.203.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Lawrence Aronhime

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:45 AM

W - 9 - 11:45 AM

R - 9 - 11:45 AM

Principles of Marketing

This course explores the role of marketing in society and within the organization. It examines the process of developing, pricing, promoting and distributing products to consumer and business markets and shows how marketing managers use the elements of the marketing mix to gain a competitive advantage. Through interactive, application-oriented exercises, case videotapes, a guest speaker (local marketer), and a group project, students will have ample opportunity to observe key marketing concepts in action. The group project requires each team to research the marketing plan for an existing product of its choice. Teams will analyze what is currently being done by the organization, choose one of the strategic growth alternatives studied, and recommend why this alternative should be adopted. The recommendations will include how the current marketing plan will need to be modified in order to implement this strategy.

Course Number: EN.660.250.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Leslie Kendrick

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Leadership Theory

Students will be introduced to the history of Leadership Theory from the “Great Man” theory of born leaders to Transformational Leadership theory of non-positional learned leadership. Transformational Leadership theory postulates that leadership can be learned and enhanced. The course will explore the knowledge base and skills necessary to be an effective leader in a variety of settings. Students will assess their personal leadership qualities and develop a plan to enhance their leadership potential.

Course Number: EN.660.332.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: William Smedick

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 2-4:30PM

W - 2-4:30PM

R - 2-4:30PM

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FILM & MEDIA STUDIES

Introduction to Short Filmmaking

In this course, students will write and direct short films using digital camera equipment, sound recording devices and film editing software programs. We will watch a variety of films in class; hold readings and discussions based on assigned text, take technical workshops on sound, lighting and hold a short workshop on 16mm film. We will study the history of filmmaking, with a strong focus on the avant-garde and experimental genres. We will also learn about current movements and trends that have developed throughout the world and have the opportunity to to meet with Baltimore filmmakers in class. Students will finish the course with a greater understanding of the lineage of cinema and will have learned a range of techniques to create, discover and develop their own language of visual storytelling. We will discuss, engage, explore and most of all have fun! No prior experience with film or video required. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.061.161.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Margaret Rorison

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Analyzing Popular Culture

This course provides an introduction to the critical analysis of popular culture through the major theoretical paradigms of media and cultural theory. The teaching method uses a combination of media studies and sociology to explore popular culture and is designed to encourage students to become more active critics. The course presents a range of media from contemporary popular music to film and television. Smaller subjects include the teen "pop" love song, the politics of representation, and the forming of subcultures.

Course Number: AS.061.222.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Meredith Ward

Campus: Online Course

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Almost Grown

An introduction to the basics of film analysis through a survey of American coming of age films from the mid 20th century to the present. Attention to questions of race, class, and gender. A variety of genres considered. No prior experience in film studies required. In-class screenings and emphasis on discussion over lecture. Each student will write regular film responses, give an oral presentation, and write a short essay, 8-10pp., with a revision.

Course Number: AS.061.228.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Lucy Bucknell

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 4 - 6:30 PM

W - 4 - 6:30 PM

R - 4 - 6:30 PM

School Daze

Teen angst and togas in comedies of American youth from The Graduate to Animal House to Lost In Translation. Course will provide an introduction to the basics of film analysis with an emphasis on discussion over lecture. Several short film responses and an essay with revision. No prior experience in film studies required.

Course Number: AS.061.252.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Lucy Bucknell & Linda DeLibero

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 10am-12:30pm

W - 10am-12:30pm

R - 10am-12:30pm

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GERMAN AND ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Online Spanish Elements I

Development of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and a midterm and final exam. In order to receive credit for Spanish 111 (if you are a JHU undergraduate), Spanish 112 must also be completed with a passing grade. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Course Number: AS.210.111.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Arancha Moreno

Campus: Online Course

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Online Spanish Elements I

Development of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and a midterm and final exam. In order to receive credit for Spanish 111 (if you are a JHU undergraduate), Spanish 112 must also be completed with a passing grade. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Course Number: AS.210.111.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Michelle Tracy

Campus: Online Course

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Online Spanish Elements II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and two hourly exams (no midterm and no final). Two textbooks are needed for the course, plus an access code to enter MySpanishLab from Pearson publishers. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.112.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Arancha Moreno

Campus: Online Course

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Online Spanish Elements II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and two hourly exams (no midterm and no final). Two textbooks are needed for the course, plus an access code to enter MySpanishLab from Pearson publishers. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.112.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Michelle Tracy

Campus: Online Course

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Online Intermediate Spanish I

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.211.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Barry Weingarten

Campus: Online Course

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Online Intermediate Spanish I

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.211.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Rosario Ramos

Campus: Online Course

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Online Intermediate Spanish II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.212.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Barry Weingarten

Campus: Online Course

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Online Intermediate Spanish II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.212.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Rosario Ramos

Campus: Online Course

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Advanced French II Through Acting

This 5-week intensive course will cover the material of Advanced Writing and Speaking in French II. Through examining excerpts of popular French theater plays (by Camus, Sartre, Feydeau, Ionesco, and others), this class proposes to 1) improve French speaking and writing skills (pronunciation, intonation, vocabulary, syntax, argumentative reasoning, creative writing) 2) understand the linguistic nuances and socio-cultural practices expressed in the texts 3) learn the basic tools of acting (body language, vocal projection, physical expressivity, emotional expression, stage direction, improvisation, etc.). The course will include watching filmed representations of plays, as well as a performance at the end of the term. The daily hour overlapping with the Intermediate class will focus on personalized, interactive, and level-based exercises. * Prerequisites: 210.202 or 210.305 or appropriate placement

Course Number: AS.210.308.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Kristin Cook-Gailloud

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11 AM

T - 9 - 11 AM

W - 9 - 11 AM

R - 9 - 11 AM

Online Advanced Spanish I

Advanced Spanish I is designed to improve the four skills: Reading, writing, listening and speaking, essential for communication. This third-year course aims to improve the students' reading and writing skills by focusing on various types of texts. Students will also engage in more formal levels of written communication. This course also focuses on refinement of grammar. Students are exposed to a deeper understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: 210.212 or appropriate S-Cape score

Course Number: AS.210.311.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Campus:

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Online Advanced Spanish I

Advanced Spanish I is designed to improve the four skills: Reading, writing, listening and speaking, essential for communication. This third-year course aims to improve the students' reading and writing skills by focusing on various types of texts. Students will also engage in more formal levels of written communication. This course also focuses on refinement of grammar. Students are exposed to a deeper understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: 210.212 or appropriate S-Cape score

Course Number: AS.210.311.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Campus: Online Course

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Online Advanced Spanish II

This third-year course aims at improving the students' oral skills by focusing on the use of standard, spoken Spanish with an emphasis on colloquial and idiomatic expressions. Students will also engage in more formal levels of communication by discussing assigned literary and non-literary topics. They will increase their listening skills through movies and other listening comprehension exercises. The course will also focus on vocabulary acquisition. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: 210.311 (Advanced Spanish) or appropriate placement exam score

Course Number: AS.210.312.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Campus: Online Course

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Online Advanced Spanish II

This third-year course aims at improving the students' oral skills by focusing on the use of standard, spoken Spanish with an emphasis on colloquial and idiomatic expressions. Students will also engage in more formal levels of communication by discussing assigned literary and non-literary topics. They will increase their listening skills through movies and other listening comprehension exercises. The course will also focus on vocabulary acquisition. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: 210.311 (Advanced Spanish) or appropriate placement exam score

Course Number: AS.210.312.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Campus: Online Course

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

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HISTORY

History of Brazil

This course is an introduction to the history of Brazil from the 16th century to the present, from the early phases of colonization to the 2014 World Cup.

Course Number: AS.100.117.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Gabriel Paquette

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 11:30AM-2PM

T - 11:30AM-2PM

R - 11:30AM-2PM

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HISTORY OF ART

The Art of Bollywood

This course examines Hindi cinema produced in Mumbai since the 1950s, focusing on key examples from each decade, from early narratives of navigating the big city to song-and-dance extravaganzas incorporating Indian-Americans. We will look at art represented in film, from modernist sculpture to ancient architecture. The course will also explore the billboards, cinema cards, and other ephemera associated with Bollywood, alongside contemporary artists' appropriations of Hindi cinema. No knowledge of Hindi is required.

Course Number: AS.010.224.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Rebecca Brown

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 4 - 6:30 PM

W - 4 - 6:30 PM

R - 4 - 6:30 PM

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HUMANITIES CENTER

Life and Form in Modern Thought

The idea of form-giving and law-giving is essential to modern thought, so is the conflict between forms and individual and collective lives.The course is a philosophical treatment of the concept of form in four spheres: aesthetics, morality, politics, history. We will read and discuss texts by, among others, Kant, Nietzsche, Lukacs, Benjamin, Schmitt, Adorno and interpret certain art- and literary works by Balzac, Malevich, Stevens, Kafka.

Course Number: AS.300.202.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Omid Mehrgan

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 3-5:30 PM

W - 3-5:30 PM

R - 3-5:30 PM

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INTERDEPARTMENTAL

Discover Hopkins Health: Food, Nutrition & Public Health

With the creation of President Barack Obama’s Task Force on Childhood Obesity, there is finally a national focus on the importance of childhood nutrition. First Lady Michelle Obama spearheads the “Let’s Move!” initiative, dedicated to the goal of eradicating childhood obesity through an emphasis on diet and physical activity. This class will tackle the issue of food, nutrition and health from the ground up; looking at multiple behavioral, cultural, and environmental factors that influence what and why we eat. We will also look at how our food systems and eating habits impact the health of individuals, communities, our country, and the world. In this two week session students will have a variety of experiences including trips to a Baltimore City urban farm, the Maryland Food Bank, farmer’s markets, one of Baltimore’s traditional public markets, and a sustainably-sourced restaurant. Students will hear guest speakers from the academic and government sectors.

Course Number: AS.360.115.51

Term: Discover Hopkins II

Dates: July 6 - July 17

Instructor: Nadine Budd & Anna Kharmats

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:00 - 4:30PM

T - 9:00 - 4:30PM

W - 9:00 - 4:30PM

R - 9:00 - 4:30PM

F - 9:00 - 4:30PM

Mini Term: Mind, Brain and Beauty

What underlies our aesthetic response to visual art and music? Do identifiable properties of objects and events evoke consistent aesthetic responses, or is beauty mostly in the eye of the beholder? Examining such questions from cognitive science, neuroscience, and philosophical perspectives, this course explores relevant research and theory in the visual and auditory domains. Several researchers will discuss their ongoing studies with the class, and students will also have the opportunity to participate in demonstration experiments that illustrate phenomena under discussion.

Course Number: AS.360.116.72

Term: Summer University Mini-Term II

Dates: July 6 - July 17

Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 3:30PM

T - 2 - 3:30PM

W - 2 - 3:30PM

R - 2 - 3:30PM

F - 2 - 3:30PM

Mini Term: Mind, Brain and Beauty

What underlies our aesthetic response to visual art and music? Do identifiable properties of objects and events evoke consistent aesthetic responses, or is beauty mostly in the eye of the beholder? Examining such questions from cognitive science, neuroscience, and philosophical perspectives, this course explores relevant research and theory in the visual and auditory domains. Several researchers will discuss their ongoing studies with the class, and students will also have the opportunity to participate in demonstration experiments that illustrate phenomena under discussion.

Course Number: AS.360.116.73

Term: Summer University Mini-Term III

Dates: July 20 - July 31

Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 10AM - 12PM

T - 10AM - 12PM

W - 10AM - 12PM

R - 10AM - 12PM

F - 10AM - 12PM

Discover Hopkins Health Studies: The Hospital

Virtually all of us were born in one, most of us will eventually spend at least some time in one. Lots of you likely aspire to spend your careers in one. No wonder we seem so fascinated with hospitals. We'll explore the history of the modern hospital with a focus on Johns Hopkins Hospital, the nation's best, nineteen years and counting.

Course Number: AS.360.118.51

Term: Discover Hopkins II

Dates: July 6 - July 17

Instructor: Alicia Puglionesi

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-4:30PM

T - 9:30-4:30PM

W - 9:30-4:30PM

R - 9:30-4:30PM

F - 9:30-4:30PM

Discover Hopkins Health Studies: The Hospital

Virtually all of us were born in one, most of us will eventually spend at least some time in one. Lots of you likely aspire to spend your careers in one. No wonder we seem so fascinated with hospitals. We'll explore the history of the modern hospital with a focus on Johns Hopkins Hospital, the nation's best, nineteen years and counting.

Course Number: AS.360.118.61

Term: Discover Hopkins III

Dates: July 20 - July 31

Instructor: Alicia Puglionesi

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:00 - 4:30PM

T - 9:30-4:30PM

W - 9:30-4:30PM

R - 9:30-4:30PM

F - 9:30-4:30PM

Scholars*

* Prerequisites: Permission and separate application required.

Course Number: AS.360.125.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Jessica Madrigal

Campus:

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

Mini-Term: Inspiring Change in Health Care

Given the crisis in health care, it is a good time to recapture the holism and lyricism found in medicine of the ancient cultures. Currently, we treat the human body as a machine to be fixed and our medical professionals as repairmen. Changing our health care into a wellness model considers the vitality of our soul and spirit as important as our mitochondrial function. We will explore a broader vision of medicine focused on the flourishing of human possibility.

Course Number: AS.360.139.73

Term: Summer University Mini-Term III

Dates: July 20 - July 31

Instructor: Georganne Giordano

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1:00 - 2:30PM

T - 1:00 - 2:30PM

W - 1:00 - 2:30PM

R - 1:00 - 2:30PM

F - 1:00 - 2:30PM

MCC: College Writing Workshop

This workshop will cover the fundamentals of expository writing in order to prepare students for college-level assignments. This will not be a lecture course; rather, students will engage in writing and editing exercises that will allow them to accumulate hands-on practice in each of the writing skills discussed. Students will learn to develop argumentative thesis statements that align with strong topic sentences, incorporate quotes and evidence smoothly and with sophistication, and engage in a thorough outlining process that will eliminate "writer's block." We will work through a "Top Ten" editing checklist for final drafts (e.g., cut repetition), practicing each skill. Students will leave the workshop with a new understanding of the practical, step-by-step process that can be used to write any college-level expository essay--and to make writing a manageable, enjoyable experience!

Course Number: AS.360.190.78

Term: Non-Homewood 2-week, Term 3

Dates: July 20 - July 31

Instructor: Marina Ruben

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

T - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

W - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

R - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

F - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

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INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

Politics of East Asia

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

Course Number: AS.190.109.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Erin Chung

Campus:

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

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MATHEMATICS

Introduction to Calculus

This course starts from scratch and provides students with all the background necessary for the study of calculus. It includes a review of algebra, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, coordinates and graphs. Each of these tools will be introduced in its cultural and historical context. The concept of the rate of change of a function will be introduced. Not open to students who have studied calculus in high school.

Course Number: AS.110.105.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Alexander Grounds

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:30AM-12PM

T - 9:30AM-12PM

W - 9:30AM-12PM

R - 9:30AM-12PM

Calculus I (Biology & Social Sciences)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, introduction to differential equations, functions of several variables, linear systems, applications for systems of linear differential equations, probability distributions. Many applications to the biological and social sciences will be discussed.

Course Number: AS.110.106.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Christopher Kauffman

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Calculus II (Biology & Social Sciences)

Differential and integral Calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, introduction to differential equations, functions of several variables, linear systems, applications for systems of linear differential equations, probability distributions. Applications to the biological and social sciences will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.107.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Christopher Kauffman

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Calculus I (Physical Sciences & Engineering)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.108.22

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Emmett Wyman

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Calculus II (Physical Sciences & Engineering)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.109.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Jordan Paschke

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Online Calculus II (6/15-7/31)

Course Dates: 6/15-7/31. Non-JHU students must be fully registered by June 8 in order to participate in the course. Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.109.88

Term: Summer University Term I Summer University Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Instructor: Joseph Cutrone & Alexa Gaines

Campus: Online Course

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Linear Algebra

Vector spaces, matrices, and linear transformations. Solutions of systems of linear equations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and diagonalization of matrices. Applications to differential equations. * Prerequisites: Calculus I. Recommended: Calculus II.

Course Number: AS.110.201.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Nitu Kitchloo

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Online Linear Algebra (6/15-7/31)

Course Dates: 6/15-7/31. Non-JHU students must register by June 8 in order to participate in the course. Vector spaces, matrices, and linear transformations. Solutions of systems of linear equations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and diagonalization of matrices. Applications to differential equations. * Prerequisites: Calculus I, recommended Calculus II.

Course Number: AS.110.201.88

Term: Summer University Term I Summer University Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Instructor: Stephen Cattell & Shengwen Wang

Campus: Online Course

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Calculus III

Calculus of functions of more than one variable: partial derivatives, and applications; multiple integrals, line and surface integrals; Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Gauss' Divergence Theorem. * Prerequisites: Calc II (110.107 or 110.109); or Honors One Variable Calculus (110.113)

Course Number: AS.110.202.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Yakun Xi

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Online Calculus III (6/15-7/31)

Course Dates: 6/15-7/31. Non-JHU students must register by June 8 in order to participate in the course. Calculus of Several Variables. Calculus of functions of more than one variable: partial derivatives, and applications; multiple integrals, line and surface integrals; Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Gauss' Divergence Theorem. * Prerequisites: Calc I and Calc II or Honors One Variable Calculus

Course Number: AS.110.202.88

Term: Summer University Term I Summer University Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Instructor: Harry Lang & Jonathan Beardsley

Campus: Online Course

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Differential Equations with Applications

This is an applied course in ordinary differential equations, which is primarily for students in the biological, physical and social sciences, and engineering. The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with the techniques of solving ordinary differential equations. The specific subjects to be covered include first order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, applications to electric circuits, oscillation of solutions, power series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, autonomous systems, Laplace transforms and linear differential equations, mathematical models (e.g., in the sciences or economics). * Prerequisites: Calculus II

Course Number: AS.110.302.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Apruv Nakade

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Online Differential Equations with Apps (6/15-7/31)

Course Dates: June 16 - August 1. Non-JHU students must register by June 6 in order to participate in the course. This is an applied course in ordinary differential equations, which is primarily for students in the biological, physical and social sciences, and engineering. Techniques for solving ordinary differential equations are studied. Topics covered include first order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, applications to electric circuits, oscillation of solutions, power series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, autonomous systems, Laplace transforms and linear differential equations, mathematical models (e.g., in the sciences or economics). * Prerequisites: Calculus II.

Course Number: AS.110.302.88

Term: Summer University Term I Summer University Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Instructor: Daniel Ginsberg & Nicholas Marshburn

Campus: Online Course

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

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MUSIC

Western Classical Music

This course is an introduction to the rich tradition of Western "Classical" music. We will examine this music from a variety of perspectives, including: 1) its historical, intellectual, and cultural background; 2) the biographical background of its composers; 3) its stylistic context; and 4) analysis of the music itself. We will approach these perspectives through a variety of activities, such as lectures, readings, writing, exams and in-class discussion.

Course Number: AS.376.231.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Kip Wile

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

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NEUROSCIENCE

An Introduction to Neuroscience

Our knowledge of brain function from the level of single molecules to human behavior continues to expand at something approaching light speed. That knowledge invades our lives every day. And decisions are made based on that knowledge from every corner of life…from physician to politician and every stop in between. This course is meant to provide a fundamental understanding of how the cells and molecules as well as the regions and systems of the brain work to have you see and hear and move and remember. The course is divided into four sections that progress from the cells of the brain and spinal cord to circuits then systems and finally behaviors. Introduction to Neuroscience is designed for any college student who has an interest in the range of disciplines we call neuroscience.

Course Number: AS.080.105.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Stewart Hendry

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 - 11:10 AM

T - 9:30 - 11:10 AM

W - 9:30 - 11:10 AM

R - 9:30 - 11:10 AM

F - 9:30 - 11:10 AM

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PHILOSOPHY

Minds and Machines

The course is a philosophical introduction to the topic of artificial intelligence. We will examine such questions as whether machines can think and whether we can build robots that have emotions, personalities and a sense of self. In doing so, we will touch upon a closely connected question: is the human mind itself a machine?

Course Number: AS.150.216.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Nikola Andonovski

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 3-5:30 PM

W - 3-5:30 PM

R - 3-5:30 PM

Contemporary Moral Issues

In this course, we will discuss ethical controversies related to some of the issues currently debated in the public sphere: homosexuality, sexism, racism, immigration, abortion, cloning, genetic enhancement, war, terrorism, torture, and others. Our goal will be to explore how major philosophical theories in ethics approach these controversies, and how they can help us understand and resolve these controversies. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.150.236.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Pavle Stojanovic

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 12:30 - 3 PM

T - 12:30 - 3 PM

R - 12:30 - 3 PM

Introduction to Philosophy of Psychology

Psychology is the study of mind and behavior, and philosophy of psychology is the study of the foundations of psychology. Foundational issues in psychology addressed by philosophy of psychology come in the form of the following questions. What is the nature of mental representation? What is the basic architecture of the mind, and is it innate? Can psychological theories proceed in abstraction from the environment? The purpose of this course is to introduce students to these and related questions and the various answers they’ve been given.

Course Number: AS.150.253.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: David Lindeman

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 4 - 6:30 PM

W - 4 - 6:30 PM

R - 4 - 6:30 PM

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PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY

Subatomic World

Introduction to the concepts of physics of the subatomic world: symmetries, relativity, quanta, neutrinos, particles and fields. The course traces the history of our description of the physical world from the Greeks through Faraday and Maxwell to quantum mechanics in the early 20th century and on through nuclear physics and particle physics. The emphasis is on the ideas of modern physics, not on the mathematics. Intended for non-science majors.

Course Number: AS.171.113.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Barry Blumenfeld

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

Stars & the Universe: Cosmic Evolution

This course looks at the evolution of the universe from its origin in a cosmic explosion to emergence of life on Earth and possibly other planets throughout the universe. Topics include big-bang cosmology; origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, planets, life, and intelligence; black holes; quasars; and relativity theory. The material is largely descriptive, based on insights from physics, astronomy, geology, chemistry, biology, and anthropology. Course website: http://henry.pha.jhu.edu/stars.html. * Prerequisites: High school algebra, geometry, trigonometry

Course Number: AS.171.118.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Wei Zheng

Campus:

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Mini-Term I: Now I See! Optical Phenomena Explained

Could you explain why rainbows form an arc or how it is possible to bend light to make an object invisible? This course aims to clearly explain some of the most beautiful optical phenomena encountered in nature or in a lab by teaching simple physics principles and using in-class demonstrations. The course is not math intensive and, rather, seeks to help the student gain an appreciation for the basic principles behind these optical effects without becoming lost in complex mathematics. An emphasis will be placed on current research that directly makes use of the physics underlying the phenomena. The ultimate goal of this course is to show students that physics is powerfully beautiful and to build their appreciation for it.

Course Number: AS.171.132.71

Term: Summer University Mini-Term I

Dates: June 22 - July 2

Instructor: Grace Bosse

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 3 - 5 PM

T - 3 - 5 PM

W - 3 - 5 PM

R - 3 - 5 PM

F - 3 - 5 PM

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

Politics of East Asia

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

Course Number: AS.190.109.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Erin Chung

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 10AM - 12:45 PM

W - 10AM - 12:45 PM

F - 10AM - 12:45 PM

American Politics in Film

This class uses film to explore a central question in American politics: what is the relationship between the public and those who endeavor to represent them? Over the course of several weeks, we will address this question by viewing Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, A Face in the Crowd, The Candidate, Wag the Dog, and The Ides of March. We will use these films to discuss how political institutions, the media, and money shape our politics. We will also consider how the representation of politics in film has changed over time.

Course Number: AS.190.110.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Adam Sheingate

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Capital: The Best Seller

When Thomas Piketty published _Capital in the Twenty-First Century_ last spring, he made the rounds on talk shows just like a movie star with a new film out, or a rock star with an album about to drop. How is such an “event” possible, and what does it tell us about the book’s subject, capital? This class explores the questions Piketty’s book raises: What is capital? How does it come about, how does it function, and what are its effects? * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.190.205.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Samuel Chambers

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 4 - 6:30 PM

W - 4 - 6:30 PM

R - 4 - 6:30 PM

The Politics of Music

This course will provide a critical examination of the role of music in political and social change. We will be especially concerned with the correspondences between musical innovations and their capacities to inspire and shape social movements as their capacity to address to the politics of race and sexuality, radical democratic resistance, etc. We will also explore how music is utilized to advance agendas that are anti-democratic, such as the transnational spread of white supremacist groups, the glorification of violence, and exclusionary nationalism.

Course Number: AS.190.208.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Philip Brendese

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 4:30 PM

T - 2 - 4:30 PM

R - 2 - 4:30 PM

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PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

Professional Writing & Communication

This course teaches students to communicate effectively with a wide variety of specialized and non-specialized audiences. Projects include production of resumes, cover letters, proposals, instructions, reports, and other relevant documents. Class emphasizes writing clearly and persuasively, creating appropriate visuals, developing oral presentation skills, working in collaborative groups, giving and receiving feedback, and simulating the real world environment in which most communication occurs. No audits.

Course Number: EN.661.110.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Nicole Jerr

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 10AM- 12:30 PM

T - 10AM-12:30 PM

R - 10AM-12:30 PM

Professional Writing & Communication

Online Course Dates: June 15-July 31st. This course teaches students to communicate effectively with a wide variety of specialized and non-specialized audiences. Projects include production of resumes, cover letters, proposals, instructions, reports, and other relevant documents. Class emphasizes writing clearly and persuasively, creating appropriate visuals, developing oral presentation skills, working in collaborative groups, giving and receiving feedback, and simulating the real world environment in which most communication occurs. No audits.

Course Number: EN.661.110.88

Term: Summer University Term I Summer University Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Instructor: Robert Graham

Campus: Online Course

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Oral Presentations

This course is designed to help students push through any anxieties about public speaking by immersing them in a practice-intensive environment. They learn how to speak with confidence in a variety of formats and venues - Including extemporaneous speaking, job interviewing, leading a discussion, presenting a technical speech, and other relevant scenarios. Students learn how to develop effective slides that capture the main point with ease and clarity, hone their message, improve their delivery skills, and write thought-provoking, well-organized speeches that hold an audience's attention. No audits.

Course Number: EN.661.150.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Laura Davis

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Oral Presentations

This course is designed to help students push through any anxieties about public speaking by immersing them in a practice-intensive environment. They learn how to speak with confidence in a variety of formats and venues - Including extemporaneous speaking, job interviewing, leading a discussion, presenting a technical speech, and other relevant scenarios.

Course Number: EN.661.150.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Julie Reiser

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

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PSYCHOLOGICAL & BRAIN SCIENCES

Childhood Disorders/Treatments: Online

This is an online course. The class will meet for ten weeks from May 26 through July 31 and will follow the deadlines for Term I for add/drop/withdraw and grade changes. This course examines the psychological disorders that are usually first diagnosed prior to adulthood. Some of the specific disorders that will be discussed are Attention-Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders, Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Learning Disorders and Mental Retardation. Students will become familiar with various diagnoses, etiologies, and methods of treatment.

Course Number: AS.200.162.87

Term: Summer University Term I Summer University Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Instructor: Ann Jarema

Campus: Online Course

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE CLASS

T - ONLINE CLASS

W - ONLINE CLASS

R - ONLINE CLASS

F - ONLINE CLASS

Discover Hopkins Health Studies: Application of Abnormal Psychology to Forensic Cases

This introductory course will examine the basic diagnostic psychology principles with special application to forensic psychology. The class will focus on investigating forensic psychology queries including: Does my client have a mental illness? Why did he or she act in such a self-defeating way? Does the law require special disposition? Should my client be punished or rehabilitated? We will explore the reasons behind why a movie star would shoplift or a famous athlete would engage in a series of extra marital relationships; why a policeman would commit a series of bank robberies in broad daylight; or why someone would shoot a Congresswoman and kill and wound many others in the process. As part of this course, students will visit with doctors and lawyers (including Judges), view and analyze video and movies about forensic cases, and participate in mock trial exercises.

Course Number: AS.200.220.51

Term: Discover Hopkins II

Dates: July 6 - July 17

Instructor: Lawrence Raifman

Campus:

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-4:30PM

T - 9:30-4:30PM

W - 9:30-4:30PM

R - 9:30-4:30PM

F - 9:30-4:30PM

Discover Hopkins Health Studies: Application of Abnormal Psy

This introductory course will examine the basic diagnostic psychology principles with special application to forensic psychology. The class will focus on investigating forensic psychology queries including: Does my client have a mental illness? Why did he or she act in such a self-defeating way? Does the law require special disposition? Should my client be punished or rehabilitated? We will explore the reasons behind why a movie star would shoplift or a famous athlete would engage in a series of extra marital relationships; why a policeman would commit a series of bank robberies in broad daylight; or why someone would shoot a Congresswoman and kill and wound many others in the process. As part of this course, students will visit with doctors and lawyers (including Judges), view and analyze video and movies about forensic cases, and participate in mock trial exercises.

Course Number: AS.200.220.53

Term: Discover Hopkins II

Dates: July 6 - July 17

Instructor: Lawrence Raifman

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-4:30PM

T - 9:30-4:30PM

W - 9:30-4:30PM

R - 9:30-4:30PM

F - 9:30-4:30PM

Discover Hopkins: Confronting Criminality in the Internet Ag

A Forensic Psychologist Confronts Criminality in the Internet Age: Profiling criminal behavior, assessing insanity, and counter-intuitive (self defeating) motivations for criminal acts typically occupy forensic psychologists who work in the criminal justice system. This course initially looks into traditional forensic psychologist pursuits, and then expands the inquiry to new forms of criminality profiling for “relational aggression” crimes like cyber-bulling & sexual harassment, computer assisted crimes, hate crimes, child pornographers, as well as those high profile (media attention catching) crimes, e.g., spree killing, murder suicide, or terrorism due to political extremism and/or religious fundamentalism. Students will study with a practicing forensic psychologist and police detectives, forensic crime lab professionals, newspaper reporters, SWAT team members, mental health doctors, computer cyber crime investigators. Finally, valuable excerpts from “The Wire,” and “Serial, the pod

Course Number: AS.200.221.61

Term: Discover Hopkins III

Dates: July 20 - July 31

Instructor: Lawrence Raifman

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-4:30PM

T - 9:30-4:30PM

W - 9:30-4:30PM

R - 9:30-4:30PM

F - 9:30-4:30PM

Psychotic at the White House

This introductory course focuses on the problem of delusional, morbidly depressed, and/or thought disordered persons who target federal officials or cites in Washington, DC. Contributing factors include: inadequate mental health commitment laws, an inability to successfully profile and prevent rarely occurring but potential dangerous behavior, pre trial commitment challenges, the insanity defense, problems associated with easy access to Federal buildings and inter agency rivalries, as well as the inevitable frenzied media response that leads to problems of copy cat behavior. Forensic psychological case studies will be featured, including presidential attempted assassin John Hinckley, Secret Service “White House cases,” Miriam Carey’s death following a car chase ending at the US Capitol, the Beltway sniper case, and others. Finally, the need for increased sensitivity to the problem of stigmatization of mentally ill non-dangerous persons will be included.

Course Number: AS.200.223.41

Term: Discover Hopkins I

Dates: June 22 - July 2

Instructor: Lawrence

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

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PUBLIC HEALTH STUDIES

Evidence in Epidemiology and Popular Culture

In the past year, we have witnessed a broad range of controversial issues: from Ebola to anti-vaxers; protests in Ferguson and New York; the legalization of marijuana and Obamacare. Often the theories of health that experts develop and promote don't resonate with the public they are intended to serve. Often times, different people interpret the same piece of evidence in very different ways. This course will teach students how to think critically about theories of health and disease and to develop communication skills to talk about public health in everyday conversation.

Course Number: AS.280.110.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Amelia Buttress

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1:30-4:00pm

T - 1:30-4:00pm

R - 1:30-4:00pm

Health, Homelessness and Social Justice

Homelessness is bad for one’s health, and its existence, persistence, and growth demonstrate deep policy failures and social ills. This course examines issues fundamental to the modern phenomena of homelessness in the U.S. – and the connection between disparate health and desperate inequality. There are ethical values and dimensions to the decisions we make about health policy – and public policy generally. Life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness, equality, justice, community, democracy, human rights, and human flourishing; there are many values that we might prioritize – both individually and collectively – as we develop and assess programs, policies, and systems. In this course, we will consider these and other values together with issues of health and homelessness. We will also examine tools of policy analysis and political action, and how those committed to changing the world can use those tools to engage that system critically.

Course Number: AS.280.224.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Adam Schneider

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 5:30 - 8 PM

T - 5:30 - 8 PM

R - 5:30 - 8 PM

GIS as a Public Health Tool

This course provides an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and presents its utility in the various fields of public health such as Epidemiology, Environmental Health and International Health. Provides exposure to GIS as a tool for describing the magnitude of health problems and for supporting health decision making. Course topics include a historical overview of the intersection between geography and public health; current epidemiological use of GIS; and, GIS applications in identifying public health problems such as the current Ebola outbreak. This course is ideal for students who desire exposure to the vast utility of GIS as it applies to public health.

Course Number: AS.280.302.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Jackie Ferguson

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 5 - 7:30 PM

T - 5 - 7:30 PM

R - 5 - 7:30 PM

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SOCIOLOGY

Sociology and Film

Do films merely mirror society, or do they in fact shape societal experience? This class will investigate these questions through a filmic analysis of sociological issues. We will consider both narrative and documentary films and use them to engage in sociological questions of class, race, and gender. We will discuss what the historical and current trends in film making and film subject say about society, and how these trends may in turn influence society. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.230.237.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Elizabeth Talbert

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1:30 - 4 PM

T - 1:30 - 4 PM

R - 1:30 - 4 PM

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WRITING SEMINARS

Mini-Term: Narrative Medicine

Enrollment limit reached. Course closed.

The course will introduce students to the role of storytelling in medicine through a variety of essays, short stories and documentaries, from Susan Sontag's Illness as Metaphor to Atul Gawande's Complications to Terry Wrong's Hopkins. In addition to studying these narratives, students will produce their own written works and meet guest writers from the local medical community. Throughout, the course will provide students with valuable practice in critical analysis and reasoning, skills that are tested on entrance exams such as the MCAT.

Course Number: AS.220.101.72

Term: Summer University Mini-Term II

Dates: July 6 - July 17

Instructor: Emily Parker

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 10AM- 11:30AM

T - 10AM- 11:30AM

W - 10AM- 11:30AM

R - 10AM- 11:30AM

F - 10AM- 11:30AM

Seriously Funny: Writing Humor Poetry

This course will examine both light verse and how humor can enrich serious subjects in poetry. We will explore many subjects, from bad love to aesthetic experiences. Principal readings will range from classic exemplars such as Shakespeare, Dryden, and Eliot to selections from American poets since 1950, as represented in the anthology "Seriously Funny: Poems about Love, Death, Religion, Art, Politics, Sex, and Everything Else." Students will be required to write several seriously funny poems of their own. Fun is mandatory. * Prerequisites: None.

Course Number: AS.220.142.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Songmuang Greer

Campus: Homewood Campus

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 12 - 2:30 PM

W - 12 - 2:30 PM

R - 12 - 2:30 PM

Writing Unreality: Fantastical Fiction

While fiction is by definition not “real,” some modes of fiction present deliberate departures from the world as we know it. This class will examine fantastical and non-realist writing, including surrealist and magic realist stories, as well as works with fairy-tale and folklore influences, and stories with elements of the uncanny or supernatural. Students will read and discuss representative fiction, complete weekly creative assignments, and participate in workshop of a final, full-length piece. * Prerequisites: IFP I preferred, but not required

Course Number: AS.220.165.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Shannon Robinson

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Surrealism and American Poetry

A study of Surrealism's influence on American poetry. Students will read essays by Andre Breton and Robert Bly, and poetry by John Ashbery, John Berryman, Louise Gluck, Sylvia Plath, Mark Strand, James Wright, and Dean Young, among many others. This course will include a weekly workshop, for which students will write poems inspired by the readings.

Course Number: AS.220.166.21

Term: Summer University Term II

Dates: June 29 - July 31

Instructor: Matthew Morton

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 10AM - 12PM

T - 10AM - 12PM

W - 10AM - 12PM

R - 10AM - 12PM

Mini-Term II: Serious Nonsense: Light & Comic Poetry

This course will provide a guided tour of some of the funniest poems ever written in English. Genres covered will include light verse, satire, parody, absurdism (“nonsense”), and others. We’ll explore the serious side of comic poetry and vice versa. Students will have the opportunity to write their own comic verse in the genres discussed.

Course Number: AS.220.167.72

Term: Summer University Mini-Term II

Dates: July 6 - July 17

Instructor: Austin Allen

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 10:30AM-12PM

T - 10:30AM-12PM

W - 10:30AM-12PM

R - 10:30AM-12PM

F - 10:30AM-12PM

Fitzgerald's Short Stories

An examination of F. Scott Fitzgerald's major short stories in the 1920s and 1930s. We'll analyze Fitzgerald's commitment to exploring the tension between two opposing intellectual movements: literary naturalism (which championed the primacy of environmental determinism) and literary realism (which championed the primacy of free will). We'll trace Fitzgerald's mercurial loyalty to each movement: his abandonment of one school of thought for the other, from one year to the next. In "May Day" he even embraced both movements equally—testimony to his belief that "the test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function". Did Fitzgerald ultimately advocate one school of thought over the other? Or, did he intend simply to stage the debate between them?

Course Number: AS.220.195.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: John Rockefeller V

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 6 - 8:30 PM

W - 6 - 8:30 PM

F - 6 - 8:30 PM

Introduction to Dramatic Writing: Film

Screenwriting workshop. This course will look at the screenplay as both a literary text and blue-print for production. Several classic screenplays will be analyzed. Students will then embark on their own scripts. We will intensively focus on character development, creating "believable" cinematic dialogue, plot development, conflict, pacing, dramatic foreshadowing, the element of surprise, text and subtext, and visual story-telling. Several classic films will be analyzed and discussed (PSYCHO, CHINATOWN, BLADE RUNNER). Students will learn professional screenplay format and write an 8-12 page screenplay that will be read in class and critiqued.

Course Number: AS.220.204.11

Term: Summer University Term I

Dates: May 26 - June 26

Instructor: Marc Lapadula

Campus: Homewood Campus

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1:30 - 5:15 PM

W - 1:30 - 5:15 PM

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Meet the Faculty
John D. Rockefeller V

John D. Rockefeller V, Ph.D.

Dr. Rockefeller lectures for The Writing Seminars.

Barbara Gruber painting

Barbara Gruber, M.F.A.

Barbara Gruber teaches painting and drawing.

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