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Courses

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Distribution (Dist.) Abbreviations
E: Engineering Science, N: Natural Science, Q: Quantitative Studies, H: Humanistic Studies, S: Social & Behavioral Studies, W: Writing Intensive

 

* Courses with an asterisk following the title are not open to Pre-College students.

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

Enframings: The Politics of Display

From "cabinets of curiosities" to modern-day museums of art, cultural and natural histories, practices of collection and display are neither banal nor apolitical. In this course, we will examine the politics of display through anthropological and philosophical texts while taking advantage of Baltimore's vibrancy as a city of museums, art, and artists through site visits.

Course Number: AS.070.126.11

Distribution: H S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Mariam Banahi

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 10 - 12:30 PM

W - 10 - 12:30 PM

F - 10 - 12:30 PM

Studying the HIV/AIDS Epidemic

This course will introduce students to the study of the HIV/AIDS epidemic as scholars in the social science and humanities have undertaken it. The readings will include ethnographies of the disease in the non-west and short theoretical readings to complicate notions of health, pleasure, healing and cure. Furthermore, by focusing on the various regions of Africa, the course hopes to demonstrate the manner in which the social and cultural landscape change the experience of the epidemic.

Course Number: AS.070.133.21

Distribution: H S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Vaibhav Saria

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

T - 2 - 5:15 PM

R - 2 - 5:15 PM

Baltimore and Urban America

New to Baltimore? Wondering about The Wire? This introductory course focuses on the social, cultural, and natural life of Baltimore, once the third-largest American city. We will consider economic development, urban crime, artistic production and environmental activism, looking comparatively to Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and Detroit. Our materials will include oral histories, literary portrayals, film and television clips, and field trips to a local art museum, a nature park, a former industrial mill, and a historic cinema. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.070.135.21

Distribution: H S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Anand Pandian

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

T - 1 - 3:15 PM

R - 1 - 3:15 PM

F - 1 - 3:15 PM

On Drugs:Anthropology of Pharmaceutical

Pharmaceuticals, both licit and illicit, prove central to life and its administration at the start of the 21st century. Accompanying the emergence of pharmaceuticals as central actants in social life are questions concerning freedom and constraint, ethical subjectivity, risk, power, and what constitutes life itself. This course will explore how anthropologists have understood and approached the place of pharmaceuticals in social life, their development and marketing, and the meaning of their consumption. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.070.141.11

Distribution: H S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Aaron Goodfellow

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

T - 10:00 - 12:30 P

W - 10:00 - 12:30 P

R - 10:00 - 12:30 P

Race and Mestizaje in Latin America

The course takes mestizaje as an entry point to explore racial projects of the state in Latin America and its mechanisms of exclusion and inclusion in different local settings. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.070.145.11

Distribution: H S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Anaid Reyes-Kipp

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

T - 1:30 - 3:45 PM

W - 1:30 - 3:45 PM

F - 1:30 - 3:45 PM

Making the Middle East

This is a course about the Middle East and how it is constituted as an area of study and intervention. The Middle East is not a neutral geographic description, and this will be a course about these people and institutions, the various ways in which they produce the Middle East, and the complex relationship between policy, academic knowledge, and humanitarian and military interventions.

Course Number: AS.070.220.21

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Paul Kohlbry

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

T - 1:30 - 3:45 PM

W - 1:30 - 3:45 PM

R - 1:30 - 3:45 PM

Crafting Community Development Projects in Baltimore**

Students will craft community development project proposals in the areas of education, health, community building or economic development. This hands-on course will focus on Baltimore City as it introduces students to the theory and practice behind community development projects, and their application to the arts. Students will conduct their work in groups and elaborate their project proposal in the city of Baltimore.

Course Number: AS.070.286.11

Distribution: H S

Campus:

Instructor: Emma Cervone

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

T - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

W - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

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APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS

Statistical Analysis I

First semester of a general survey of statistical methodology. Topics include descriptive statistics, introductory probability, conditional probability, random variables, expectation, sampling, the central limit theorem, classical and robust estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Case studies from psychology, epidemiology, economics and other fields serve to illustrate the underlying theory. Some use of Minitab, Excel or R, but no prior computing experience is necessary. Recommended Course Background: four years of high school mathematics. Students who may wish to undertake more than two semesters of probability and statistics should consider EN.550.420-EN.550.430. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics.

Course Number: EN.550.111.11

Distribution: Q E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jason Matterer

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 3 - 5:30 PM

T - 3 - 5:30 PM

W - 3 - 5:30PM

R - 3 - 5:30 PM

Statistical Analysis II

Second semester of a general survey of statistical methodology. Topics include least squares, regression and analysis of variance, correlation, nonparametric methods, analysis of categorical data, contingency tables and chi-square tests, the likelihood concept, and Bayesian inference. * Prerequisites: 550.111

Course Number: EN.550.112.21

Distribution: Q E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Fred Torcaso

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Discrete Mathematics

Introduction to the mathematics of finite systems. Logic; Boolean algebra; induction and recursion; sets, functions, relations, equivalence, and partially ordered sets; elementary combinatorics; modular arithmetic and the Euclidean algorithm; group theory; permutations and symmetry groups; graph theory. Selected applications. The concept of a proof and development of the ability to recognize and construct proofs are part of the course. Recommended Course Background: Four years of high school mathematics. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics.

Course Number: EN.550.171.21

Distribution: Q

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Joe Paat

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Introduction to Biostatistics

A self-contained course covering various data analysis methods used in the life sciences. Topics include types of experimental data, numerical and graphical descriptive statistics, concepts of (and distinctions between) population and sample, basic probability, fitting curves to experimental data (regression analysis), comparing groups in populations (analysis of variance), methods of modeling probability (contingency tables and logistic regression). * Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics.

Course Number: EN.550.230.21

Distribution: Q E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Avanti Athreya

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Probability and Statistics

An introduction to probability and statistics at the calculus level, intended for engineering and science students planning to take only one course on the topics. Combinatorial probability, independence, conditional probability, random variables, expectation and moments, limit theory, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, tests of means and variances, goodness-of-fit. Recommended co-requisite: multivariable calculus. Students cannot receive credit for both 550.310 and 550.311. Students cannot receive credit for 550.310 after having received credit for 550.420 or 550.430. * Prerequisites: Calculus I and II

Course Number: EN.550.310.11

Distribution: Q E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Bruno Jedynak

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

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ARABIC

Beginning Arabic I (Montgomery County Campus)

This course meets from June 9 - July 3, 2014. Introductory course in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Modern Standard Arabic. Presents basic grammatical structures and a basic vocabulary. Through oral-aural drill in classroom, videos, and reading/writing exercises, students attain a basic level of competence on which they can build in subsequent years of study.

Course Number: AS.375.119.74

Distribution:

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Instructor: Khalil Tahrawi

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Term: Mont. .74

Days & Times:

M - 9 AM-12:30 PM

W - 9 AM-12:30 PM

R - 9 AM-12:30 PM

Beginning Arabic II (Montgomery County Campus)

This course meets from July 7 - August 1, 2014. Continuation of Beginning Arabic I. Introductory course in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Modern Standard Arabic. Presents basic grammatical structures and a basic vocabulary. Through oral-aural drill in classroom, tapes in Language Laboratory, and reading/writing exercises, students attain a basic level of competence on which they can build in subsequent years of study. * Prerequisites: Beginning Arabic I or permission of the instructor

Course Number: AS.375.120.75

Distribution:

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Instructor: Khalil Tahrawi

Credits: 3

Term: Mont. .75

Days & Times:

M - 9 AM-12:30 PM

W - 9 AM-12:30 PM

R - 9 AM-12:30 PM

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ART

Art of Architecture

In this course, students will learn to design, draw, and see like an architect. A series of progressive design exercises will teach the practical capacities and habits of mind that lead not merely to competence but success and advancement in the field. We will look at what architecture has been, discuss what it is becoming, and explore both formal and narrative methodologies for design. The class will use the built environment of the city - and the Homewood campus - as a classroom and a site for interpretive drawing and creative design work. Essential in the architect's education is the sketchbook, which functions not merely as a place to 'store' what has been witnessed, but a place to interpret and explore implications of design in the world, whether close to home or traveling in exotic locales.

Course Number: AS.371.147.21

Distribution:

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Charles Phinney

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

W - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

R - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

Landscape Photography

Course begins on July 7th. In this course students will experience the drama and beauty of the urban and rural landscape. The first 1 1/2 hours of each class are dedicated to working in the field where students will hone their camera technique as well as learn elements of composition and develop a personal style. In the lab, students will learn the fundamentals of Photoshop, HDR, panorama and they will also be introduced to the beauty of black and white in Silver Efex software. Digital SLRs are provided.

Course Number: AS.371.166.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Phyllis Berger

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9:20AM-12:30 PM

W - 9:20AM-12:30 PM

R - 9:20AM-12:30 PM

Color Explorations & Theory

Course begins on June 30th. We will explore the physical characteristics, psychological effects and basic physics of color through exercises in various applications. Primary mediums include: Paint, Color-Aid Paper & Photoshop. Emphasis is placed on the investigation of color effects used in applied and fine arts.

Course Number: AS.371.171.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Clarissa Gregory

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

T - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

R - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

Drawing Outside the Box

We will explore essential principles, tools, terminology & media, while pushing the boundaries of “traditional drawing” by adopting alternatives such as drawing with wire, inking with grass, and animating gesture in Photoshop. Not only will we draw from observation, which builds the perceptual platform and skills for spatial understanding and rendering, we will draw from intuition, movement, and outdoor stimuli. Subject matter may include: still life, interiors, landscape, architecture, the human figure and personal narrative. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.371.201.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Clarissa Gregory

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 10AM - 12:30 PM

T - 10AM - 12:30 PM

R - 10AM - 12:30 PM

Documentary Photography

Course begins on July 7. In this course, we will explore different genres of documentary photography including: the fine art document, photojournalism, social documentary photography, the photo essay and photography of propaganda.Weekly field trips to locations which will inspire projects. Students will work on a semester-long photo-documentary project on a subject of their choice. Students will be loaned a digital SLR for the semester.

Course Number: AS.371.303.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Phyllis Berger

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 5:10 PM

W - 2 - 5:10 PM

R - 2 - 5:10 PM

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BIOLOGY

Introduction to Laboratory Research

Course runs 6/16 – 27. This is an exciting time to work in biotechnology research. The Human Genome Project is generating fundamental genetic information at a breathtaking rate. Basic research findings are being applied to medicine, agriculture, and the environment; and a variety of new biotechnology products are moving into production. Behind each of these accomplishments lies extensive laboratory research. In this class, students will explore a variety of experimental techniques and evaluate their roles in modern biotechnology research.

Course Number: AS.020.120.76

Distribution: N

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Instructor: Janelle Ciafardoni

Credits: 2

Term: Mont. .76

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 -12:30 PM

T - 9:30 -12:30 PM

W - 9:30 -12:30 PM

R - 9:30 -12:30 PM

F - 9:30 -12:30 PM

Introduction to Biological Molecules

This course presents an overview to biochemistry and molecular biology, especially focusing on biotechnology and medicine. Students will have classroom and laboratory experience and group presentations. * Prerequisites: High School Biology and Chemistry (Both with a grade of A ).

Course Number: AS.020.205.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Richard Shingles

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 AM -12 PM LAB

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

Introduction to Biological Molecules

This course presents an overview to biochemistry and molecular biology, especially focusing on biotechnology and medicine. Students will have classroom and laboratory experience and group presentations. * Prerequisites: High School Biology and Chemistry (Both with a grade of A ).

Course Number: AS.020.205.22

Distribution: N

Campus:

Instructor: Richard Shingles

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM LAB

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

Introduction to Immunology

This course is designed to introduce students to the cells, major receptors and signals critical for understanding more advanced concepts in immunology. They should leave with a basic understanding of the players and events leading to an effective immune defense against pathogens. They should also begin to recognize disease consequences of certain immune malfunctions. * Prerequisites: Biology

Course Number: AS.020.229.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Abby Geis

Credits: 2

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 10 - 11:45 AM

W - 10 - 11:45 AM

R - 10 - 11:45 AM

Bioinformatics, Microbes, & You

This course runs from July 14 - July 25, 2014. Bioinformatics brings together biology, computer science and information technology. Current biological research involves the use of bioinformatics tools important in identifying new pathogens and genes within organisms. Learn how to use bioinformatics databases and tools for genome analysis to identify unknowns, whether they are pathogens or other organisms. Each student will do a project using database searching and genomic analysis tools to uncover genes and/or identify an unknown pathogen from its DNA sequence.

Course Number: AS.020.242.78

Distribution: N

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Instructor: Kristine Obom & Beatrice Kondo

Credits: 2

Term: Mont. .78

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

T - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

W - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

R - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

F - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

The Biology of Cancer

This course provides an overview of cancer and its diagnosis and treatment. Lectures, demonstrations, and discussions will explore the roles that genetic errors, growth factors, oncogenes, tumor suppressors, genetic caretakers, cell survival and death, angiogenesis, and metastasis play in cancer development. Covered topics also include cancer diagnosis, cancer prevention, genetic testing, treatment and patient self-advocacy. Course will include several guest experts to discuss topics of interest.

Course Number: AS.020.244.77

Distribution:

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Instructor: Meredith Safford

Credits: 2

Term: Mont. .77

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

T - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

W - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

R - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

F - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

Biochemistry*

The molecules responsible for the life processes of animals, plants and microbes will be examined. The structures, biosynthesis, degradation and interconversion of the major cellular constituents including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids will illustrate the similarity of the biomolecules and metabolic processes involved in diverse forms of life. * Prerequisites: 030.205-206 Introductory Organic Chemistry I & II

Course Number: AS.020.305.11

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Robert Horner

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:15 AM

T - 9 - 11:15 AM

W - 9 - 11:15 AM

R - 9 - 11:15 AM

F - 9 - 11:15 AM

Biochemistry Laboratory*

The lab course reinforces topics presented in Biochemistry through experiments which quantitatively measure cellular components and processes. Topics include pH, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids and enzymes. Lab lecture is 12 noon to 1:00pm, and lab is 1:30-4:30pm, MWF. * Prerequisites: 020.305 Biochemistry

Course Number: AS.020.315.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Robert Horner

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 2

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 12 - 4:30 PM

W - 12 - 4:30 PM

F - 12 - 4:30 PM

Eukaryotic Molecular Biology*

A deep understanding of molecular biology is required for modern biomedical research and medicine. In this course, students will learn critical concepts and molecular details of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, gene expression and cell-cycle regulation, non-coding RNAs, DNA recombination and repair, etc. Students will learn key aspects of DNA cloning, PCR, blotting as well as bioinformatics and basic model organisms such as yeast. The class time will be highly interactive. * Prerequisites: Genetics OR Biochemistry OR similar course(s)

Course Number: AS.020.380.11

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: David Zappulla

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3 PM

T - 1 - 3 PM

R - 1 - 3 PM

F - 1 - 3 PM

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CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Lab*

Students will have additional meeting times outside of class. Students are challenged with laboratory projects that are not well-defined and learn to develop an effective framework for approaching experimental work by identifying the important operating variables, deciding how best to obtain them, and using measured or calculated values of these operating variables to predict, carryout, analyze and improve upon experiments. Each student analyzes various biomolecular engineering projects. In addition to technical objectives, this course stresses oral and written communication skills and the ability to work effectively in groups. * Prerequisites: 540.301, 540.304, 540.306, 540.490

Course Number: EN.540.313.11

Distribution: E W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lise Dahuron

Credits: 6

Term: I

Days & Times:

T - 1 - 6 PM

F - 1 - 6 PM

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CHEMISTRY

Introductory Chemistry I

The fundamental principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, elementary thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, kinetics, and transition metal chemistry are introduced in this course. To be taken with Introductory Chemistry Laboratory unless lab has been previously completed. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. High school physics and calculus are strongly recommended as prerequisites. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: Pre-College requires instructor permission.

Course Number: AS.030.101.11

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Paul Donohoo-Vallett & Art Bragg

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11 AM

T - 9 - 11 AM

R - 9 - 11 AM

F - 9 - 11 AM

Introductory Chemistry II*

The fundamental principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, elementary thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, kinetics, and transition metal chemistry are introduced in this course. To be taken with Introductory Chemistry Laboratory unless lab has been previously completed. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. High school physics and calculus are strongly recommended as prerequisites. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: AS 030.101 or equivalent

Course Number: AS.030.102.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Paul Donohoo-Vallett & Art Bragg

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:00 AM

T - 9 - 11:00 AM

R - 9 - 11:00 AM

F - 9 - 11:00 AM

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I

Laboratory work includes some quantitative analysis and the measurement of physical properties. Open only to those who are registered for or have successfully completed Introductory Chemistry 030.101. * Prerequisites: Pre-College requires instructor permission, 030.101 co-requisite or prerequisite

Course Number: AS.030.105.11

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Paul Donohoo-Vallett & Art Bragg

Credits: 1

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 12 - 3:00 PM

T - 12 - 3:00 PM

R - 12 - 3:00 PM

F - 12 - 3:00 PM

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II*

Laboratory work includes some quantitative analysis and the measurement of physical properties. Open only to those who are concurrently registered for or have completed Introductory Chemistry Lecture II. * Prerequisites: AS 030.105 or equivalent

Course Number: AS.030.106.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Paul Donohoo-Vallett & Art Bragg

Credits: 1

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 12 - 3:00 PM

T - 12 - 3:00 PM

R - 12 - 3:00 PM

F - 12 - 3:00 PM

Mini-Term: Introduction to Bioorganic Chemistry

Meets M-F June 23rd - July 3rd. This interdisciplinary course is an introductory-level class to relate biological phenomena with basic principles of chemistry. Organic chemistry or biochemistry in college is one of the most stressful classes to some students and sometimes they are pushed by assignments and tests during the entire semester without having a chance to enjoy fun side of chemistry. This course will introduce some basic concepts of chemistry and organic chemistry and applications of those concepts into biological systems, in more enjoyable way with a smaller group of students than regular courses. The course aims biology-majors to get a molecular view and chemistry-majors to have fun to find how their chemical knowledge can be used to explain biological process. Also other students will learn about both and have an idea what interdisciplinary science is. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.030.110.71

Distribution: N E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Heaseung Sophia Chung

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Term: Mini-Term I

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

T - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

W - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

R - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

F - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

Introductory Organic Chemistry I*

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics include interrelationships of structure, physical properties, synthesis, and reactions and their mechanisms as well as a brief overview of bio-organic chemistry. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: Introductory Chemistry or the equivalent.

Course Number: AS.030.205.11

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: David Klein

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9:00-11:30am

T - 9:00-11:30am

W - 9:00-11:30am

R - 9:00-11:30am

F - 9:00-11:30am

Introductory Organic Chemistry II*

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics include interrelationships of structure, physical properties, synthesis, and reactions and their mechanisms as well as a brief overview of bio-organic chemistry. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: Introductory Chemistry or the equivalent.

Course Number: AS.030.206.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: David Klein

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9:00-11:30am

T - 9:00-11:30am

W - 9:00-11:30am

R - 9:00-11:30am

F - 9:00-11:30am

Problem Solving Methodology in Organic Chemistry I*

This course will focus on the skills and strategies often utilized for solving problems in organic chemistry. In a seminar-style format, we will focus on a variety of strategies and techniques that students are otherwise expected to discover independently. This optional course is designed to help students succeed in Organic Chemistry I. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis, and is designed to be fun (believe it or not). Students work together in groups to solve challenging problems, focusing on the strategies necessary to solve each problem. This course is not required in order to succeed in Organic Chemistry I, but students in the past have found it to be helpful in guiding their study efforts for Organic Chemistry I. * Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to students registered in current Organic Chemistry term.

Course Number: AS.030.207.11

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: David Klein

Credits: 2

Term: I

Days & Times:

T - 12:30 - 3 PM

R - 12:30 - 3 PM

Problem Solving Methodology in Organic Chemistry II*

This course will focus on the skills and strategies often utilized for solving problems in organic chemistry. In a seminar-style format, we will focus on a variety of strategies and techniques that students are otherwise expected to discover independently. This optional course is designed to help students succeed in Organic Chemistry II. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis, and is designed to be fun (believe it or not). Students work together in groups to solve challenging problems, focusing on the strategies necessary to solve each problem. This course is not required in order to succeed in Organic Chemistry II, but students in the past have found it to be helpful in guiding their study efforts for Organic Chemistry II. * Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to students registered in current Organic Chemistry term.

Course Number: AS.030.208.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: David Klein

Credits: 2

Term: II

Days & Times:

T - 12:30 - 3 PM

R - 12:30 - 3 PM

Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory*

Laboratory work includes fundamental laboratory techniques and preparation of representative organic compounds. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Organic Chemistry. Note: This one-semester course is offered each term. Introductory Organic Chemistry I/II requires one semester of the laboratory.

Course Number: AS.030.225.11

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Thomas Lectka

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 12:30-4:00pm

T - 12:30-4:00pm

W - 12:30-4:00pm

R - 12:30-4:00pm

F - 12:30-4:00pm

Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory*

Laboratory work includes fundamental laboratory techniques and preparation of representative organic compounds. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Organic Chemistry. Note: This one-semester course is offered each term. Introductory Organic Chemistry I/II requires one semester of the laboratory.

Course Number: AS.030.225.12

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Thomas Lectka

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 4:00-7:30pm

T - 4:00-7:30pm

W - 4:00-7:30pm

R - 4:00-7:30pm

F - 4:00-7:30pm

Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory*

Laboratory work includes fundamental laboratory techniques and preparation of representative organic compounds. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Organic Chemistry. Note: This one-semester course is offered each term. Introductory Organic Chemistry I/II requires one semester of the laboratory.

Course Number: AS.030.225.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Thomas Lectka

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 12:30-4:00pm

T - 12:30-4:00pm

W - 12:30-4:00pm

R - 12:30-4:00pm

F - 12:30-4:00pm

Mini-Term: Magic Bullets: How Drugs Really Work

This course will be an overview of the basic science behind frequently administered drugs. Medicines such as antibiotics, antivirals, cancer drugs, painkillers, and cardiovascular drugs will be covered. The course will focus on how these molecules cause a desirable effect in the body. Those with minimal background in chemistry/biology are encouraged to enroll.

Course Number: AS.030.303.71

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Daniel Marous

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Term: Mini-Term I

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

T - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

W - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

R - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

F - 9:30 - 11:30 AM

Mini-term: Global Energy Resources for the Future

Students gain a critical understanding of societal energy sources in scientific, economic, and political contexts. Past, present, and future energy sources are discussed in terms of their scope and limitations. Emphasis on the fundamental details of each energy technology and incisive evaluation of policy regarding energy consumption and its environmental consequences. Topics include global warming and climate change, fossil fuels, alternative energies, and energy security and productivity.

Course Number: AS.030.321.71

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Erinn Brigham

Credits: 1

Term: Mini-Term I

Days & Times:

M - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

T - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

W - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

R - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

F - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

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CLASSICS

Love, War and Glory: The Gods and Heroes of Greek Mythology

Greek myths fascinate us as adventurous narratives, yet they always sound enigmatic and require interpretation. This course will combine the pleasure of reading stories and the concern for their understanding. Readings in ancient and modern texts. The course meets the Hopkins requirements for a major in classics. May not be taken S/U.

Course Number: AS.040.134.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Danilo Piana

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 4:30 PM

W - 2 - 4:30 PM

F - 2 - 4:30 PM

The Grandeur That Was Rome

At the peak of its power, the Roman empire extended from Scotland to Syria, incorporating numerous cultures, attitudes, and lifestyles. This course examines Roman social practices, political institutions, and religion from the empire's humble beginnings through its final period, using a wide variety of materials including drama, poetry, history, and oratory. The course meets the Hopkins requirements for a major in classics. May not be taken S/U.

Course Number: AS.040.135.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Maren Mueller

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 4:30 PM

W - 2 - 4:30 PM

F - 2 - 4:30 PM

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

Introduction to Programming in Java

This course introduces fundamental structured and object-oriented programming concepts and techniques, using Java, and is intended for all who plan to use computer programming in their studies and careers. Topics covered include variables, arithmetic operators, control structures, arrays, functions, recursion, dynamic memory allocation, files, class usage and class writing. Program design and testing are also covered, in addition to more advanced object-oriented concepts including inheritance and exceptions as time permits. Course homework involves significant programming (15-20 hours/wk). Attendance and participation is expected. * Prerequisites: Familiarity with using computers.

Course Number: EN.600.107.21

Distribution: E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Joanne Selinski

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

T - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

R - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

F - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

Intro Programming for Science & Engr

An introductory "learning by doing" programming course for scientists, engineers, and everybody else who will need basic programming skills in their studies and careers. We cover the fundamentals of structured, modular, and (to some extent) object-oriented programming as well as important design principles and software development techniques. We will apply our shiny new programming skills by developing computational solutions in the Python programming language to a number of real-world problems from a variety of disciplines. This course may not be used for the CS major or minor requirements, except as a substitute for 600.107. Students will be expected to do significant programming (15-20 hours/wk). Attendance and participation is required. * Prerequisites: Familiarity with using computers.

Course Number: EN.600.112.11

Distribution: E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Joanne Selinski

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

Intermediate Programming

This course teaches intermediate to advanced programming, using C and C++. (Prior knowledge of these languages is not expected.) We will cover low-level programming techniques, as well as object-oriented class design, and the use of class libraries. Specific topics include pointers, dynamic memory allocation, polymorphism, overloading, inheritance, templates, collections, exceptions, and others as time permits. Students are expected to learn syntax and some language specific features independently. Course work involves significant programming projects in both languages. * Prerequisites: 600.107 or 600.112 or AP Computer Science.

Course Number: EN.600.120.11

Distribution: E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Staff

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

Mini-Term: Intro to Computer Integrated Surgery

This course will give an introduction to the concepts and major elements of computer-integrated surgery (CIS) through clinical applications. Students will learn to ask questions and look for answers the way clinical engineers build and analyze CIS systems. Major topics will include medical imaging, image processing, surgical planning, surgical robotics, robot navigation, systems integration, and clinical validation. No computer programming will be necessary to complete the assignments. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: pre-calc required; knowledge of linear algebra helpful.

Course Number: EN.600.145.73

Distribution: E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Simon Leonard

Credits: 1

Term: Mini-Term III

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 2:30 PM

T - 1 - 2:30 PM

W - 1 - 2:30 PM

R - 1 - 2:30 PM

F - 1 - 2:30 PM

Data Structures*

This course covers the design and implementation of data structures including arrays, stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, heaps, balanced trees (e.g. 2-3 trees, AVL-trees) and graphs. Other topics include sorting, hashing, memory allocation, and garbage collection. Course work involves both written homework and Java programming assignments. * Prerequisites: 600.107: Intro to Programming

Course Number: EN.600.226.21

Distribution: Q E

Campus:

Instructor: Peter Froehlich

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

Computer Systems Fundamentals*

We study the design and performance of a variety of computer systems from simple 8-bit micro-controllers through 32/64-bit RISC architectures all the way to ubiquitous x86 CISC architecture. We'll start from logic gates and digital circuits before delving into arithmetic and logic units, registers, caches, memory, stacks and procedure calls, pipelined execution, super-scalar architectures, memory management units, etc. Along the way we'll study several typical instruction set architectures and review concepts such as interrupts, hardware and software exceptions, serial and other peripheral communications protocols, etc. A number of programming projects, frequently done in assembly language and using various processor simulators, round out the course. * Prerequisites: 600.107: Intro to Programming or equivalent.

Course Number: EN.600.233.11

Distribution: E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Peter Froehlich

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 AM - 12 PM

W - 9:30 AM - 12 PM

F - 9:30 AM - 12 PM

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EARTH & PLANETARY SCIENCE

Introduction to Global Environmental Change

The structure, composition, and dynamics of the Earth system and how we learn about them. Plate-tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, and other internal processes give the clues. Surface processes including weathering, erosion, and sedimentation are significantly affected by human activities, resulting in changes in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. The present-day problems, such as global climate change, resource depletion, and loss of biodiversity, have natural analogues from the Earth history, which are the key to the present and future.

Course Number: AS.270.103.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Sakiko Olsen

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

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EAST ASIAN STUDIES

Korean Culture: Past and Present

This course will provide an introduction to Korean society and culture through a close study of the recent and highly acclaimed film Chunhyang, which is a theatrical version of a famous 18th century Korean literary work. It provides a complex and visually effective window into late Korean traditional culture, educational system, family and gender issues, literature, and the performing arts. Through class work and readings, students will be able to study the concept of culture as a complex, intricate, and interrelated fabric of meanings and symbols. In this regard, the study of Korea will allow students to begin to acquire the tools to understand many cultures as well as current developments in South and North Korean inter-relations. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.310.244.11

Distribution: H S

Campus:

Instructor: Sungwha Oh

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 10 - 12:30 PM

T - 10 - 12:30 PM

R - 10 - 12:30 PM

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ECONOMICS

Elements of Macroeconomics

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. Prerequisite: basic facility with graphs and algebra.

Course Number: AS.180.101.11

Distribution: S

Campus:

Instructor: Dan Li

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 10 -12:30 PM

W - 10 -12:30 PM

R - 10 -12:30 PM

Elements of Macroeconomics

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis, with emphasis on total national income and output, employment, the price level and inflation, money, the government budget, the national debt, and interest rates. The role of public policy. Applications of economic analysis to government and personal decisions. * Prerequisites: Basic facility with graphs and algebra.

Course Number: AS.180.101.21

Distribution: Q S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Gizem Kosar

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

Elements of Microeconomics

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services; theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems. Students should have basic facility with graphs and algebra. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.180.102.11

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Mikhail Smirnov

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Elements of Microeconomics

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services; theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems. * Prerequisites: Student should be comfortable with basic algebra & graphs

Course Number: AS.180.102.22

Distribution: S

Campus:

Instructor: Daniel Molina

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9:00 - 11:30 AM

W - 9:00 - 11:30 AM

F - 9:00 - 11:30 AM

International Trade

This course presents international trade theory and applies it to policy analysis and empirical studies.The theory covers both the classical theory of comparative advantage as well as recent advances of new trade theory. A broad range of real-world topics, including trade flows, factor mobility, trade policy and institutions will be discussed. * Prerequisites: Elemens of Microeconomics (180.102)

Course Number: AS.180.241.11

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Liuchun Deng

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 10:30AM-12:30PM

T - 10:30AM-12:30PM

W - 10:30AM-12:30PM

R - 10:30AM-12:30PM

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ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Circuits*

An introductory course on electric circuit analysis. Topics include time domain and frequency domain analysis techniques, transient and steady-state response, and operational amplifiers. * Prerequisites: 110.108 and 110.109.

Course Number: EN.520.213.11

Distribution: E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Howard Weinert

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9 -11:45 AM

T - 9 -11:45 AM

W - 9 -11:45 AM

R - 9 -11:45 AM

Signals and Systems I*

An introductory class covering signal and system representation in continuous-time and discrete-time, Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, and z-transforms. * Prerequisites: 110.108-109; 520.213.

Course Number: EN.520.214.21

Distribution: Q E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Howard Weinert

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:40 AM

T - 9 - 11:40 AM

W - 9 - 11:40 AM

R - 9 - 11:40 AM

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ENGLISH

The Novel and the American Family

While America and the “American Dream” promise the possibility of unlimited individual development, the American family has often resisted this promise and cramped America’s style. In this course we will explore works by Philip Roth, Eudora Welty, Alice Walker, and Jonathan Franzen that dramatize this tension in devastating and hilarious ways. Against the backdrop of post-WWII America, these writers struggle with issues of race, sex, and the erosion of tradition, shedding light on the challenging relation between the individual and the family.

Course Number: AS.060.102.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Anthony Wexler

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 4:30 PM

W - 2 - 4:30 PM

R - 2 - 4:30 PM

Satan in Literature

What is it about Satan that has captured the literary imagination? From moral opposition to God in the Book of Job, to divine punishment in Dante's Inferno, from political revolution in Milton's Paradise Lost to irreverence of tradition in Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses, this class will examine the ways in which Satan has been used in literature to represent a variety of moral, political and social forces, from Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Modern eras. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.060.204.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jacob Chilton

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

Anti-Heroes of British Fiction

When is it Good to be Bad?: Anti-Heroes of British Fiction. Although the Victorians are widely known for their interest in traditional virtues, many Victorian novels are actually full of anti-heroes: of cynical, willful figures who lack respect for conventional norms. The course explores ways that three Victorian novels both privilege and critique anti-heroic villains, including Mr. Hyde (from Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde), Heathcliff (from Wuthering Heights), and Becky Sharp (from Vanity Fair). * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.060.250.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Matthew Flaherty

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

Visionary America

This course will consider the role that visionary experiences play in the development of American literary forms across the 19th and 20th centuries. Beginning with William James’s seminal analysis of such profound, individual encounters with transcendence, we will examine a formally diverse array of texts--ranging from Uncle Tom’s Cabin to Allen Ginsberg’s Howl--that seek either to record visionary experiences, to represent them, or even to induce them in readers. Through this lens, we will consider how religious expression, subjective experience, and literary aesthetics overlap with one another across American literary history.

Course Number: AS.060.251.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Grant Shreve

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 4:30 PM

W - 2 - 4:30 PM

F - 2 - 4:30 PM

Literature and Knowledge

Can poems, plays, and imaginary narratives teach us something about the real world? Or does their fictional status make them unreliable as sources of knowledge? This course explores these questions by examining classical and contemporary discussions of the topic in conjunction with major works of literature. Primary sources include works by Shakespeare, Jane Austen, and William Golding, while the criticism will be represented among others by Aristotle, Dr. Johnson, and Martha Nussbaum.

Course Number: AS.060.262.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Roger Maioli

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 12:30 - 3 PM

W - 12:30 - 3 PM

F - 12:30 - 3 PM

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP & MANAGEMENT

Introduction to Business

This course is designed as an introduction to the terms, concepts, and values of business and management. The course comprises three broad categories: the economic, financial, and corporate context of business activities; the organization and management of business enterprises; and, the marketing and production of goods and services. Topic specific readings, short case studies and financial exercises all focus on the bases for managerial decisions as well as the long and short-term implications of those decisions in a global environment. No audits.

Course Number: EN.660.105.21

Distribution: S W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lawrence Aronhime

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:45 AM

T - 9 - 11:45 AM

W - 9 - 11:45 AM

R - 9 - 11:45 AM

Financial Accounting

The course in Financial Accounting is designed for anyone who could be called upon to analyze and/or communicate financial results and/or make effective financial decisions in a for-profit business setting. No prior accounting knowledge or skill is required for successful completion of this course. Because accounting is described as the language of business, this course emphasizes the vocabulary, methods, and processes by which all business transactions are communicated. The accounting cycle, basic business transactions, internal controls, and preparation and understanding of financial statements including balance sheets, statements of income and cash flows are covered. No audits.

Course Number: EN.660.203.11

Distribution:

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lawrence Aronhime

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:45 AM

W - 9 - 11:45 AM

R - 9 - 11:45 AM

Principles of Marketing

This course explores the role of marketing in society and within the organization. It examines the process of developing, pricing, promoting and distributing products to consumer and business markets and shows how marketing managers use the elements of the marketing mix to gain a competitive advantage. Ethical and global issues relevant to marketers and the impact of the Internet on marketing strategy will be addressed throughout the course. Through interactive, application-oriented exercises, case videotapes, a guest speaker (local marketer), and a group project, students will have ample opportunity to observe key marketing concepts in action as well as apply them individually and as part of a team.

Course Number: EN.660.250.21

Distribution:

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Leslie Kendrick

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30PM

Online Social Media & Marketing

This online course explores strategies for monitoring and engaging consumers in digital media. Students will gain practical knowledge about developing, implementing and measuring social media marketing campaigns. They will learn how to analyze what consumers are saying and connect with them by leveraging word of mouth, viral and buzz marketing through sites like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. A series of assignments build upon each other toward a final social media marketing plan for a selected consumer product or service. No on-campus components required. No audits. * Prerequisites: EN.660.250 Principles of Marketing

Course Number: EN.660.453.11

Distribution: W

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Keith Quesenberry

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - Online

T - Online

W - Online

R - Online

F - Online

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FILM & MEDIA STUDIES

Auteur 101: Short Filmmaking Laboratory

Students direct short films, based on poems,* using production equipment from the JHU Digital Media Center. We will watch films in class (animation, music videos, silent films, and more), take field trips to Artscape and Creative Alliance screenings, and meet with Baltimore filmmakers. We will study similarities between poetry and film: symbols, motifs, the line/the frame, the cut/the stanza break, narration, quotation. Course culminates in a public screening of student films. Prerequisites: None. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.061.161.21

Distribution: H

Campus:

Instructor: Meg Rorison & Jimmy Joe Roche

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 6:30 - 9 PM

T - 6:30 - 9 PM

R - 6:30 - 9 PM

American Masterpieces

An introduction to Hollywood cinema and the basics of film analysis through the close reading of selected 20th century American classics including Citizen Kane, On the Waterfront, Annie Hall, and others. Emphasis on discussion over lecture. Several short film responses and an essay with revision. No prior experience in film studies required.

Course Number: AS.061.248.11

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lucy Bucknell

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 5 - 7:30 PM

W - 5 - 7:30 PM

R - 5 - 7:30 PM

School Daze

Teen angst and togas in comedies of American youth from The Graduate to Animal House to Lost In Translation. Course will provide an introduction to the basics of film analysis with an emphasis on discussion over lecture. Several short film responses and an essay with revision. No prior experience in film studies required.

Course Number: AS.061.252.21

Distribution: H W

Campus:

Instructor: Lucy Bucknell

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 5 - 7:30 PM

W - 5 - 7:30 PM

R - 5 - 7:30 PM

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GERMAN AND ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Learner Managed French Elements I

This 5-week intensive course will allow true beginners and students with limited background to reach the level of French Elements II (offered in the Spring), with the option of continuing on their own in August in order to place into Intermediate I in the Fall. Extensive online component, including multimedia, interactive exercises, supplements class hours. This course is recommended for more independent learners. May not be taken on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. * Prerequisites: No previous of French or placement score under 200

Course Number: AS.210.103.21

Distribution:

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Staff

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 6:00-8:30PM

T - 6:00-8:30PM

R - 6:00-8:30PM

Online Spanish Elements I

Development of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and a midterm and final exam. In order to receive credit for Spanish 111 (if you are a JHU undergraduate), Spanish 112 must also be completed with a passing grade. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Course Number: AS.210.111.11

Distribution:

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Michelle Tracy

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

Online Spanish Elements II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and two hourly exams (no midterm and no final). Two textbooks are needed for the course, plus an access code to enter MySpanishLab from Pearson publishers. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.112.21

Distribution:

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Maria Del Rosario Ramos

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

Italian Elements I Online

The aim of the course is to provide students with basic listening, reading, writing, speaking and interactional skills in the language. The course will be taught entirely online, and presence on campus is not required. Students should have access to a computer, high-speed internet connection, and a microphone.

Course Number: AS.210.151.11

Distribution:

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Alessandro Zannirato

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

Italian Elements II Online

This is a continuation of the Italian Elements I course (AS210.151).The aim of the course is to provide students with basic listening, reading, writing, speaking and interactional skills in the language. The course will be taught entirely online, and presence on campus is not required. Students should have access to a computer, high-speed internet connection, and a microphone. * Prerequisites: 151 or Placement exam - Part I

Course Number: AS.210.152.21

Distribution:

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Alessandro Zannirato

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

Intermediate French II Through Acting

This 5-week intensive course will cover the material of Intermediate French II. Through examining excerpts of popular French theater plays (by Camus, Sartre, Feydeau, Ionesco, and others), this class proposes to 1) improve French speaking and writing skills (pronunciation, intonation, vocabulary, syntax, argumentative reasoning, creative writing) 2) understand the linguistic nuances and socio-cultural practices expressed in the texts 3) learn the basic tools of acting (body language, vocal projection, physical expressivity, emotional expression, stage direction, improvisation, etc.). The course will include watching filmed representations of plays, as well as a performance at the end of the term. The daily hour overlapping with the Advanced class will focus on personalized, interactive, and level-based exercises. * Prerequisites: 210.201 or 210.205 or appropriate placement

Course Number: AS.210.208.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Kristin Cook-Gailloud

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1:00 - 3:00PM

T - 1:00 - 3:00PM

W - 1:00 - 3:00PM

R - 1:00 - 3:00PM

Intermediate French I Through Cinema

This 5-week intensive course will cover the material of Intermediate French I with an emphasis on listening comprehension and speaking: an attractive selection of classic and contemporary French movies (Les Intouchables, Manon des Sources, La Vie en rose, Sugar Cane Alley, among others) will enhance students’ acquisition of the language and will deepen their understanding of French and francophone cultures. The daily hour overlapping with the Advanced class will focus on personalized, interactive, and level-based grammar followed by group discussion on the movies. Creative role-play activities will develop students’ fluency. * Prerequisites: 210.102 or appropriate placement; placement exam link available at grll.jhu.edu

Course Number: AS.210.210.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Claude Guillemard

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9:00 – 11:00AM

T - 9:00 – 11:00AM

W - 9:00 – 11:00AM

R - 9:00 – 11:00AM

Online Intermediate Spanish I

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.211.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Aranzazu Hubbard

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

Online Intermediate Spanish II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.212.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Barry Weingarten

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

Intermediate Italian I - Online

Taught in Italian. Course continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Italian Elements courses (listening, speaking, reading, writing) on topics of increasing complexity. Course adopts a continuous assessment system. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: AS210.152, or appropriate Placement exam score - Part 1

Course Number: AS.210.251.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Alessandro Zannirato

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

Intermediate Italian II - Online

Taught in Italian. Course continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Intermediate Italian I (listening, speaking, reading, writing) on topics of increasing complexity. Course adopts a continuous assessment system. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: AS210.251, or appropriate Placement exam score - Parts I and II

Course Number: AS.210.252.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Alessandro Zannirato

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

Advanced French II Through Acting

This 5-week intensive course will cover the material of Advanced Writing and Speaking in French II. Through examining excerpts of popular French theater plays (by Camus, Sartre, Feydeau, Ionesco, and others), this class proposes to 1) improve French speaking and writing skills (pronunciation, intonation, vocabulary, syntax, argumentative reasoning, creative writing) 2) understand the linguistic nuances and socio-cultural practices expressed in the texts 3) learn the basic tools of acting (body language, vocal projection, physical expressivity, emotional expression, stage direction, improvisation, etc.). The course will include watching filmed representations of plays, as well as a performance at the end of the term. The daily hour overlapping with the Intermediate class will focus on personalized, interactive, and level-based exercises. * Prerequisites: 210.202 or 210.305 or appropriate placement

Course Number: AS.210.308.21

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Kristin Cook-Gailloud

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1:00 - 3:00PM

T - 1:00 - 3:00PM

W - 1:00 - 3:00PM

R - 1:00 - 3:00PM

Advanced French I Through Cinema

This 5-week intensive course will cover the material of Advanced Writing and Speaking in French I. An attractive selection of classic and contemporary French movies (Les Intouchables, Manon des Sources, La Vie en rose, Sugar Cane Alley, among others) will enhance students’ vocabulary, as well as their listening and speaking proficiency. Creative role-playing will develop their fluency. A writing intensive course, it will also emphasize reading (fictional and non fictional texts) through the French explication de textes approach. The daily hour overlapping with the Intermediate class will focus on personalized, interactive, and level-based grammar followed by group discussion on the movies. * Prerequisites: 210.102 or appropriate placement; placement exam link available at grll.jhu.edu

Course Number: AS.210.310.11

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Claude Guillemard

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 10:00 – 12PM

T - 10:00 – 12PM

W - 10:00 – 12PM

R - 10:00 – 12PM

Online Advanced Spanish I

Advanced Spanish I is designed to improve the four skills: Reading, writing, listening and speaking, essential for communication. This third-year course aims to improve the students' reading and writing skills by focusing on various types of texts. Students will also engage in more formal levels of written communication. This course also focuses on refinement of grammar. Students are exposed to a deeper understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: 210.212 or appropriate S-Cape score

Course Number: AS.210.311.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

Online Advanced Spanish II

This third-year course aims at improving the students' oral skills by focusing on the use of standard, spoken Spanish with an emphasis on colloquial and idiomatic expressions. Students will also engage in more formal levels of communication by discussing assigned literary and non-literary topics. They will increase their listening skills through movies and other listening comprehension exercises. The course will also focus on vocabulary acquisition. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: 210.311 (Advanced Spanish) or appropriate S-Cape score

Course Number: AS.210.312.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

Spanish Language Practicum Online*

Prerequisites - AS 210.411 The Spanish Language Practicum involves a specially designed project, taking place some time within the summer period of 5/27-8/1, related to student's minor concentration. Provides an opportunity to use Spanish language in real world contexts. May be related to current employment context or developed in agencies or organizations that complement student's research and experimental background while contributing to the improvement of language proficiency. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Please see Dr. Sanchez in advance of registering for this course to discuss your project and timeline.

Course Number: AS.210.412.87

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

Spanish Language Practicum Online*

Prerequisites - AS 210.411 The Spanish Language Practicum involves a specially designed project, taking place some time within the summer period of 5/27-8/1, related to student's minor concentration. Provides an opportunity to use Spanish language in real world contexts. May be related to current employment context or developed in agencies or organizations that complement student's research and experimental background while contributing to the improvement of language proficiency. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Please see Dr. Sanchez in advance of registering for this course to discuss your project and timeline.

Course Number: AS.210.412.88

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

Real French:From Slang to Sophistication

This class will teach the realities of the French language, ranging from slang to the most sophisticated forms of expression. We will study excerpts of films, literary works, essays, political speeches, etc., in order to examine which level of speech is at work. Course also provides students with linguistic tools that will help them reach the highest level of written proficiency, as well as develop their personal stylistic voice. * Prerequisites: Advanced Writing and Speaking French or JHU supplementary test or by permission.

Course Number: AS.211.420.21

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Kristin Cook-Gailloud

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 3 - 5:15 PM

W - 3 - 5:15 PM

F - 3 - 5:15 PM

Cinema in Spain and Latin America

Offered in dual format with one classroom session linked to an online interactive component. We will study and discuss a selection of recent films from Spain, Argentina, Peru, Mexico and Cuba. We will concentrate on hot political and social issues in these countries as reflected in each film. Issues under discussion will be: gender and sexuality, national memory, themes and styles in film-making at the local and global levels, the imprint of social media networks. Taught in Spanish. Advanced Spanish is a prerequisite. The course counts as credit for the Major and Minor in Spanish. * Prerequisites: Advanced Spanish.

Course Number: AS.215.375.11

Distribution: H

Campus:

Instructor: Eduardo Gonzalez

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 4:45PM

W - 2 - 4:45PM

R - 2 - 4:45PM

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HISTORY

The U.S. City in the 20th Century

This introductory course explores the history of urban America. Combining the themes of American urban history, the history of the black freedom struggle, and migration studies, it provokes questions about the possibilities and problems facing cities since the late nineteenth century. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.100.156.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Nathan Connolly

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

The History of Black Capitalism

This introductory course explores the history of commercial practices among African Americans and black immigrants to the United States between the 1880s and the present. Students will consider the relationship between black business and the development of the U.S. regulatory state. They will also explore how forms of black culture and intellectual life related to the development of American capitalism over the course of the twentieth century.

Course Number: AS.100.359.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Nathan Connolly

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

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HISTORY OF ART

Art, Medicine, and the Body: From Leonardo to Body Worlds

This course explores five centuries of fruitful collaboration between physicians and artists -- those who observe the body in order to heal it, and those who do the same in order to picture it. From medieval medical manuscripts, where the body is portrayed as a microcosm of the created world, to the anatomical forays of Renaissance artists such as Leonardo da Vinci and Albrecht Dürer; from gruesome depictions of bodily pain, disease, and corruption in the art of Matthias Grünewald to the eloquent exposure of the body's interior by anatomists such as Andreas Vesalius; from the spectacularization of the body in Enlightenment science to the rubberized cadavers of Gunther von Hagen's Body Worlds project -- these and other topics will bring into focus the complex intersections between the history of medicine and the history of art.

Course Number: AS.010.226.21

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Mitchell Merback

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 AM - 12 PM

T - 9:30 AM - 12 PM

R - 9:30 AM - 12 PM

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HUMANITIES CENTER

Introduction to the Philosophy of Law

This course examines works by four major figures in German Idealist philosophy and political theory: Kant, Fichte, Hegel, and Marx. With Kant the whole project of German Idealism begins, and with Marx this project takes a specific shape and path that was to decisively affect the fate of German, especially Hegelian, philosophy in terms of its political implications and promises. We will focus on the concepts of legal personality, moral subjectivity, the state, and resistance/revolution.

Course Number: AS.300.237.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Omid Mehrgan

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:45 PM

W - 1 - 3:45 PM

F - 1 - 3:45 PM

Philosophy and the Emotions

We will read some of the most important texts in the history of the philosophy of the emotions, including works by Plato, Descartes, Spinoza, Schopenhauer, Heidegger, and Freud. We will discuss themes such as love, shame, apathy, anxiety, the mind-body problem, the notion of spirit, the notion of mood, and the overall problem of the distinction between emotion and reason. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.300.239.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Avraham Rot

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

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INTERDEPARTMENTAL

Health and Society: The Fundamentals of Public Health

This course runs from June 30 - July 11, 2014. This course provides an overview of the basic principles of public health, including an introduction to the concepts of public and population health, the infrastructure of the United States (U.S.) health care system, strategies for health promotion and disease prevention, tools to identify and control sources of disease at the population level, health policy, and an exploration of contemporary health topics.

Course Number: AS.360.112.77

Distribution:

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Instructor: Matthew (Mateo) Banegas & Neetu Chawla Jeremy Steeves

Credits: 1

Term: Mont. .77

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 2:30 PM

T - 1 - 2:30 PM

W - 1 - 2:30 PM

R - 1 - 2:30 PM

F - 1 - 2:30 PM

Concepts in Cancer and Cancer Prevention

This course meets from July 14 - 25, 2014. This is an introductory course designed to provide students with a general knowledge of the basic concepts of cancer biology and oncogenesis, an overview of cancer trends with a particular emphasis on approaches to cancer prevention along the cancer prevention continuum (i.e. primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary prevention of disease) and advances made in this area in recent years. The goal of this course is to provide a broad, integrated overview of cancer biology and trends, as well as cancer prevention efforts from a transdisciplinary perspective.

Course Number: AS.360.113.78

Distribution:

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Instructor: Marie Bradley & Krystle Kuhs and Naomi Walsh

Credits: 1

Term: Mont. .78

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

Mini Term: Mind, Brain and Beauty

What underlies our aesthetic response to visual art and music? Do identifiable properties of objects and events evoke consistent aesthetic responses, or is beauty mostly in the eye of the beholder? Examining such questions from cognitive science, neuroscience, and philosophical perspectives, this course explores relevant research and theory in the visual and auditory domains. Several researchers will discuss their ongoing studies with the class, and students will also have the opportunity to participate in demonstration experiments that illustrate phenomena under discussion.

Course Number: AS.360.116.73

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez

Credits: 1

Term: Mini-Term III

Days & Times:

M - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

T - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

W - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

R - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

F - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

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LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

Crafting Community Development Projects in Baltimore**

Students will craft community development project proposals in the areas of education, health, community building or economic development. This hands-on course will focus on Baltimore City as it introduces students to the theory and practice behind community development projects, and their application to the arts. Students will conduct their work in groups and elaborate their project proposal in the city of Baltimore.

Course Number: AS.070.286.11

Distribution: H S

Campus:

Instructor: Emma Cervone

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

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MATHEMATICS

Introduction to Calculus

This course starts from scratch and provides students with all the background necessary for the study of calculus. It includes a review of algebra, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, coordinates and graphs. Each of these tools will be introduced in its cultural and historical context. The concept of the rate of change of a function will be introduced. Not open to students who have studied calculus in high school.

Course Number: AS.110.105.21

Distribution: Q

Campus:

Instructor: Jai Ung Jun

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Calculus I (Biology & Social Sciences)

Differential and integral Calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, introduction to differential equations, functions of several variables, linear systems, applications for systems of linear differential equations, probability distributions. Applications to the biological and social sciences will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.106.11

Distribution: Q

Campus:

Instructor: Christopher Kauffman

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Calculus II (Biology & Social Sciences)

Differential and integral Calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, introduction to differential equations, functions of several variables, linear systems, applications for systems of linear differential equations, probability distributions. Applications to the biological and social sciences will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.107.21

Distribution: Q

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Stephen Cattell

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Calculus I (Physical Sciences & Engineering)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.108.11

Distribution: Q

Campus:

Instructor: Chenyang Su

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Calculus I (Physical Sciences & Engineering)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.108.22

Distribution: Q

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Daniel Ginsberg

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Calculus II (Physical Sciences & Engineering)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.109.21

Distribution: Q

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Shengwen Wang

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Online Calculus II (6/16- 8/1)

Course Dates: June 16 - August 1. Non-JHU students must be fully registered by June 6 in order to participate in the course. Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.109.88

Distribution: Q

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Jonathan Beardsley & Emmett Wyman

Credits: 4

Term: I/II

Days & Times:

Linear Algebra

Vector spaces, matrices, and linear transformations. Solutions of systems of linear equations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and diagonalization of matrices. Applications to differential equations. * Prerequisites: Calculus I. Recommended: Calculus II.

Course Number: AS.110.201.11

Distribution: Q

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Cong Ma

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Online Linear Algebra (6/16- 8/1)

Course Dates: June 16 - August 1. Non-JHU students must register by June 6 in order to participate in the course. Vector spaces, matrices, and linear transformations. Solutions of systems of linear equations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and diagonalization of matrices. Applications to differential equations. * Prerequisites: Calculus I, recommended Calculus II.

Course Number: AS.110.201.88

Distribution: Q

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Jordan Paschke & Apurv Nakade

Credits: 4

Term: I/II

Days & Times:

Calculus III

Calculus of functions of more than one variable: partial derivatives, and applications; multiple integrals, line and surface integrals; Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Gauss' Divergence Theorem. * Prerequisites: Calc II (110.107 or 110.109); or Honors One Variable Calculus (110.113)

Course Number: AS.110.202.21

Distribution: Q

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Yakun Xi

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1:00-3:30PM

T - 1:00-3:30PM

W - 1:00-3:30PM

R - 1:00-3:30PM

Online Calculus III (6/16- 8/1)

Course Dates: June 16 - August 1. Non-JHU students must register by June 6 in order to participate in the course. Calculus of Several Variables. Calculus of functions of more than one variable: partial derivatives, and applications; multiple integrals, line and surface integrals; Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Gauss' Divergence Theorem. * Prerequisites: Calc I and Calc II or Honors One Variable Calculus

Course Number: AS.110.202.88

Distribution: Q

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Harry Lang & Po Yao Chang

Credits: 4

Term: I/II

Days & Times:

Differential Equations with Applications

This is an applied course in ordinary differential equations, which is primarily for students in the biological, physical and social sciences, and engineering. The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with the techniques of solving ordinary differential equations. The specific subjects to be covered include first order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, applications to electric circuits, oscillation of solutions, power series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, autonomous systems, Laplace transforms and linear differential equations, mathematical models (e.g., in the sciences or economics). * Prerequisites: Calculus II

Course Number: AS.110.302.11

Distribution: Q

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Nima Moini

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Online Differential Equations with Apps Online (6/16 - 8/1)

Course Dates: June 16 - August 1. Non-JHU students must register by June 6 in order to participate in the course. This is an applied course in ordinary differential equations, which is primarily for students in the biological, physical and social sciences, and engineering. Techniques for solving ordinary differential equations are studied. Topics covered include first order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, applications to electric circuits, oscillation of solutions, power series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, autonomous systems, Laplace transforms and linear differential equations, mathematical models (e.g., in the sciences or economics). * Prerequisites: Calculus II.

Course Number: AS.110.302.88

Distribution: Q

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: John Ross & Junyan Zhu

Credits: 4

Term: I/II

Days & Times:

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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Mini Term: Introduction to Computer Aided Design (CAD)

This course explores many aspects of the mechanical design and development process using computer-aided design (CAD). Solid modeling, assembly modeling, detail drafting, and structural analysis are all explored using the PTC Creo Parametric 2.0 CAD software.

Course Number: EN.530.114.71

Distribution: E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Michael Boyle

Credits: 1

Term: Mini-Term I

Days & Times:

M - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

T - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

W - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

R - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

F - 2:30 - 4:30 PM

Energy and Environment*

This course focuses on topics of current and developing energy sources and their impact on the environment. It is an upper-level multidisciplinary course that draws on science and engineering topics from the core curriculum related to dynamics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer, electrical and environmental engineering, and requires integration of understanding achieved in core studies. After the general introduction, the course will begin with a review of energy, energy conversion and thermodynamics related topics to provide a framework for the understanding of current and modern future technologies. After the discussion of fossil fuels and related energy and environmental topics, special attention will be devoted to modern trends in nuclear energy generation (generation IV nuclear reactors), renewable energy with emphasis on solar energy and hydrogen as energy carrier. Topics of sustainability and the environmental impact of energy consumption will be addressed. * Prerequisites: Physics.

Course Number: EN.530.437.21

Distribution: N E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Cila Herman

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

T - 3 - 7:00 PM

R - 3 - 7:00 PM

Computer Aided Fluid Mechanics and Heat*

Computer simulation has become an essential part of science and engineering - this course introduces the student to the use of computer simulation in the disciplines of heat transfer and fluid mechanics. The commercial software COMSOL is used to solve a wide variety of problems, ranging from simple models for which analytical solutions are available, to complex, unsteady, multiphysics real-life problems. Problems will be solved by identifying proper governing equations and boundary conditions first, and then implementing these in the COMSOL environment. Applications will include heat conduction, convection and radiation, internal and external flows, with applications ranging from mechanical to biomedical and aerospace engineering. Students should have a laptop suitable for running the COMSOL software available for this class. * Prerequisites: Knowledge of calculus, differential equations, physics

Course Number: EN.530.444.11

Distribution: N E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Cila Herman

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

T - 3 - 7:00 PM

R - 3 - 7:00 PM

Manufacturing Engineering*

The course presents a modern, all-inclusive look at manufacturing processes. This course is focused on manufacturing processes as an objective science rather than a descriptive art. Quantitative and engineering-oriented approach provides numerical problem exercises, homework & case study, labs, quiz and final exam. * Prerequisites: 530.101; 530.352

Course Number: EN.530.454.21

Distribution: E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Yury Ronzhes

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 10 - 12:30 PM

T - 10 - 12:30 PM

R - 10 - 12:30 PM

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MUSEUMS AND SOCIETY

Discover Hopkins: Examining Archaeological Objects

In this course, we examine artifacts from the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum in order to learn about the role of materials such as ceramics, metal, glass, faience and stone in the history, art and culture of the ancient world. We will visit local artists’ studios to understand how these materials are utilized today, and examine comparative examples in local art museums. Students will work hands on with artifacts each day.

Course Number: AS.389.120.41

Distribution:

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Sanchita Balachandran

Credits: 1

Term:

Days & Times:

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MUSIC

Music and Narrative

Although hundreds of years have been spent on the development of musical and narrative theories, only relatively recently have these theories been put in conversation with one another. How does the development of new ways of structuring stories reflect similar historical progressions in musical form? Are there ways in which we could think of authors as composers, invoking sounds to create unique and specific voices? In exploring such questions, we will look at musical selections ranging from Beethoven to Berlioz to Blues; theorists such as Benjamin, Adorno, and Peter Kivy; authors including Chekhov, Woolf, and Alice Munro. We will spend two classes discussing the art and politics of film music. Some music theory experience preferred, but not required.

Course Number: AS.376.176.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Alexander Creighton

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

Western Classical Music

This course is an introduction to the rich tradition of Western "Classical" music. We will explore this music from a variety of perspectives, including historical, biographical, stylistic and musical. No previous experience is required.

Course Number: AS.376.231.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Kip Wile

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:15 AM

W - 9 - 11:15 AM

R - 9 - 11:15 AM

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NEUROSCIENCE

An Introduction to Neuroscience

Our knowledge of brain function from the level of single molecules to human behavior continues to expand at something approaching light speed. That knowledge invades our lives every day. And decisions are made based on that knowledge from every corner of life…from physician to politician and every stop in between. This course is meant to provide a fundamental understanding of how the cells and molecules as well as the regions and systems of the brain work to have you see and hear and move and remember. The course is divided into four sections that progress from the cells of the brain and spinal cord to circuits then systems and finally behaviors. Introduction to Neuroscience is designed for any college student who has an interest in the range of disciplines we call neuroscience.

Course Number: AS.080.105.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Stewart Hendry

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 - 11:10 AM

T - 9:30 - 11:10 AM

W - 9:30 - 11:10 AM

R - 9:30 - 11:10 AM

F - 9:30 - 11:10 AM

Neuroscience Lab*

This course will give students the "hands-on" experience of the inter-disciplinary nature of neuroscience. Students will use anatomical and neuro-physiological techniques to understand the basic underlying principles of neuroscience. There will be a total of 13 class meetings during the summer session. * Prerequisites: AS.080.305, AS.080.306 or AS.200.141

Course Number: AS.080.250.11

Distribution: N S

Campus:

Instructor: Jason Trageser

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 12 - 2:45 PM

W - 12 - 2:45 PM

R - 12 - 2:45 PM

Nervous System I*

The Nervous System is a fully integrated, two-semester course that surveys the cellular and molecular biology of neurons as well as the structure and function of the nervous system. Students must register for Nervous System II offered in the second term. * Prerequisites: AS 080.203 or AS 200.141 or Permission.

Course Number: AS.080.305.11

Distribution: N

Campus:

Instructor: Stewart Hendry

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 2:45 PM

T - 1 - 2:45 PM

W - 1 - 2:45 PM

R - 1 - 2:45 PM

F - 1 - 2:45 PM

Nervous System II*

The course uses the functional organization of the somatosensory system as a means to examine mechanisms of neutral development. Generation and maturation of neurons, guidance of axons, formation of synapses and the regressive events that shape the adult nervous system will be examined. At the same time we will explore the structure and function of brain regions that allow us to feel pain and temperature, detect vibration, recognize shape and perceive where we are in space. Finally, the single-neuron events that lead to adaptive changes in function will be explored in the context of central nervous system control of movement and of higher order functions of speech and memory. Students who do not register for Nervous System I offered during the first term should not register for this class. * Prerequisites: AS.080.305 and AS.080.203

Course Number: AS.080.306.21

Distribution: N

Campus:

Instructor: Stewart Hendry

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 2:45 PM

T - 1 - 2:45 PM

W - 1 - 2:45 PM

R - 1 - 2:45 PM

F - 1 - 2:45 PM

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PHILOSOPHY

Philosophic Classics

Philosophy, according to the German philosopher Immanuel Kant, deals with four main questions: (1) What can I know? (2) What ought I to do? (3) What may I hope? (4) What is human being? This course introduces students to philosophy through critical reading of selected texts from the history of philosophy. The philosophers whose texts will be discussed include Plato, Aristotle, Descartes and Kant. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.150.111.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Arash Abazari

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 4:30 - 7 PM

W - 4:30 - 7 PM

R - 4:30 - 7 PM

The Philosophy of Race and Racism

What is race? What is racism? And how should we deal with these things? In dealing with these three questions, we will read both philosophical and empirical literature germane to the burgeoning field of philosophy of race. The course will mostly cover the problems that race and racism pose in the context of North American social and political life. Topics include: historical antecedents that shaped the modern concept of race, the metaphysics and biology of race, the social construction of race, the marks of racist practices, "race talk," the psychology of implicit racial bias.

Course Number: AS.150.135.21

Distribution: H S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Patrick O'Donnell

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1:30 - 4 PM

W - 1:30 - 4 PM

F - 1:30 - 4 PM

Neuroethics

Can electroencephalography show that we lack free will? Can modern neuroimaging show that someone will commit a crime in the future? Is it ethical to use this promethean knowledge to put them in jail before they even commit a crime? In Neuroethics, we'll consider these and other pressing questions emerging at the frontiers of neuroscience and modern moral theory. * Prerequisites: None.

Course Number: AS.150.217.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Pavle Stojanovic

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9:45 - 12:30 PM

T - 9:45 - 12:30 PM

R - 9:45 - 12:30 PM

Bioethics

This course is a systematic introduction to current issues in medical ethics. Its topics include the professional-patient relationship, abortion, euthanasia, experimentation on human subjects, experimentation on animals, the allocation of health resources, and stem-cell research, among others. No prior exposure to philosophy is necessary.

Course Number: AS.150.219.11

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Nicholas Goldberg

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1:30 - 4 PM

W - 1:30 - 4 PM

R - 1:30 - 4 PM

Introduction to Philosophy of Physics

This course starts on July 7th and runs until August 1st. This course aims at introducing the student to the basic philosophical issues that lie at the heart of the modern physicist’s conception of nature. To this end, we will look carefully at the foundations of two modern theories of physics, namely, the special theory of relativity and quantum theory. Relativity revolutionized our understanding of space and time, whereas quantum physics shattered our established beliefs about causality and determinism in nature. In the special relativity section of this class, we will cover topics such as the speed of light postulate, conventionality of simultaneity thesis, and the twin paradox . In the foundations of quantum physics, we will probe the measurement problem, Schrodinger's cat paradox and the uncertainty principle. No previous background in physics is required.

Course Number: AS.150.309.21

Distribution: H N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Genco Guralp

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:45 PM

W - 1 - 3:45 PM

F - 1 - 3:45 PM

Philosophy of Human Rights

From domestic debates about abortion and health care to international dialogue about women's rights, genital mutilation and genocide human rights claims have become increasingly common, and we've come to rely on the discourse of human rights to assess the way human beings are treated by one another and by states. But what are human rights? How are human rights claims justified? Are human rights really objective and universal or are they contingent and relative to particular cultures? Where did the human rights culture begin, and how has it become so important? This course aims to explore these questions by examining foundational human rights documents, historical works on human rights and contemporary philosophical inquiry into their foundations (or lack thereof).

Course Number: AS.150.315.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Thomas Wilk

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 AM - 12:00

W - 9:30 AM - 12:00

R - 9:30 AM - 12:00

Puzzles and Paradoxes

This course is a survey of puzzles and paradoxes, both ancient and modern. The puzzles and paradoxes surveyed break down into the following topic areas: (i) space, time, and motion, (ii) logic and semantics, (iii) rational belief and action. Specific puzzles and paradoxes include the following: Zeno’s paradoxes, the Liar paradox, Newcomb’s paradox, Fitch’s paradox, and the Surprise Examination paradox. Besides being fun to think about, these puzzles and paradoxes touch on many areas of philosophy, including philosophy of language, logic, metaphysics, and epistemology. Students will also gain analytical skills applicable well beyond philosophy.

Course Number: AS.150.316.21

Distribution: H

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: David Lindeman

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

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PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY

General Physics: Physical Science Major I*

Lectures on general principles illustrated by experiments provide a thorough introductory study of physics. Conference periods, assigned in the first class, offer more detailed discussion of principles and the solution of problems. Students are required to take General Physics Laboratory concurrently with the course. The first term covers mechanics and thermodynamics. The second term addresses electricity and magnetism, optics, and selected topics in modern physics. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 173.111-112 may not take any other course in the summer session and should devote full time to these subjects. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: 110.106 or 110.108

Course Number: AS.171.101.11

Distribution: N E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Marek Cieplak

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

General Physics: Physical Science Major II*

Lectures on general principles illustrated by experiments provide a thorough introductory study of physics. Conference periods, assigned in the first class, offer more detailed discussion of principles and the solution of problems. Students are required to take General Physics Laboratory concurrently with the course. The first term covers mechanics and thermodynamics. The second term addresses electricity and magnetism, optics, and selected topics in modern physics. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 173.111-112 may not take any other course in the summer session and should devote full time to these subjects. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: 110.107 or 110.109

Course Number: AS.171.102.21

Distribution: N E

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Marek Cieplak

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

T - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

Subatomic World

Introduction to the concepts of physics of the subatomic world: symmetries, relativity, quanta, neutrinos, particles and fields. The course traces the history of our description of the physical world from the Greeks through Faraday and Maxwell to quantum mechanics in the early 20th century and on through nuclear physics and particle physics. The emphasis is on the ideas of modern physics, not on the mathematics. Intended for non-science majors.

Course Number: AS.171.113.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Barry Blumenfeld

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

General Physics Laboratory I*

Experiments performed in the lab provide further illustration of the principles discussed in General Physics. Students are required to take this course concurrently with General Physics unless they already have received credit for the lab. Note: First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: Co-requisite 171.101

Course Number: AS.173.111.11

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Marek Cieplak

Credits: 1

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 4 PM

T - 1 - 4 PM

R - 1 - 4 PM

F - 1 - 4 PM

General Physics Laboratory II*

Experiments performed in the lab provide further illustration of the principles discussed in General Physics. Students are required to take this course concurrently with General Physics unless they already have received credit for the lab. Note: First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: Co-requisite 171.102

Course Number: AS.173.112.21

Distribution: N

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Marek Cieplak

Credits: 1

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 4 PM

T - 1 - 4 PM

R - 1 - 4 PM

F - 1 - 4 PM

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

Critical Race Theory*

This course explores past and present theories of race in order to illuminate contemporary racial inequalities. We will examine how race intersects with variables such as gender, class, ethnicity and citizenship. Where many political commentators treat whiteness as the absence of race, we will consider competing theoretical accounts of whiteness as race. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.190.203.11

Distribution: H S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Philip Brendese

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

T - 2 - 4:30 PM

W - 2 - 4:30 PM

F - 2 - 4:30 PM

Global Politics in Theory and Film

This class offers an introduction to different approaches to the study of international politics by using film, literature, and political theory. The class explores realist, constructivist, feminist, and critical theories of global politics. It addresses two broad themes: the emergence of global political spaces and, second, the implications of 'globalization' for contemporary politics. The class both provides an introduction to the study of international politics and takes an in-depth look at the global.

Course Number: AS.191.107.11

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Benjamin Meiches

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 6 - 8:30 PM

W - 6 - 8:30 PM

R - 6 - 8:30 PM

Feminism and Film

The purpose of this course is to understand the expression of feminist concerns in cinematic discourse. The course will explore the productive tensions between various genres of film, feminist film theory, and themes in feminist thought. The class will examine films through the lens of feminist texts that focus on topics such as the portrayal of sexuality, subjectivity, and the maternal, as well as the effects of the masculine gaze. This course is cross-listed with the Women, Gender, and Sexuality Program.

Course Number: AS.191.218.21

Distribution: H S W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Katherine Glanz

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 4:30 PM

W - 2 - 4:30 PM

F - 2 - 4:30 PM

Diplomacy in the Middle East

This course examines diplomacy in the Middle East, with a focus on the evolution diplomacy from the Ottoman era to the contemporary management of foreign relations, the practice of diplomacy in the Arab League and domestic foreign policy institutions, diplomatic strategies ranging from coercive diplomacy in the Persian Gulf War to political mediation in the Lebanon crises, and public diplomacy in the age of social media and the “New Arab Public”. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.191.233.11

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Karyn Wang

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 2:30 - 5 PM

T - 2:30 - 5 PM

R - 2:30 - 5 PM

The Stewart/Colbert Effect*

This course examines the roles of Comedy Central’s Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert in the contemporary media and political landscape. Using recent work in media studies, political theory, and cultural studies, we will explore issues of satire, parody, and the distinctive roles Stewart and Colbert play vis a vis the major news networks. We will also look at political activism and what their popularity might mean for the future of media politics.

Course Number: AS.191.241.11

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Chas. Phillips

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 10:30 AM - 1 PM

T - 10:30 AM - 1 PM

R - 10:30 AM - 1 PM

Globalization and Development: The Clash of Civilizations or a New World Order?

The course aims to introduce students to the major debates in globalization and development studies: Is globalization a new phenomenon? Does global interconnectedness lead to a clash of civilizations or to one-way diffusion from developed to developing countries, converting the globe into a giant mall? Are there processes of intermixing across time, space and identities? Is globalization an engine of progress or a vehicle of socio-economic polarization? Why has development been contested in some places and not in others? What would a completely developed world look like? These questions will be explored using multi-media and texts from various disciplines and historical periods. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.191.251.11

Distribution: H S

Campus:

Instructor: Anatoli Ignatov

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 4 - 6:30 PM

W - 4 - 6:30 PM

R - 4 - 6:30 PM

Comparative Political Institutions

This course will provide a detailed overview of the main executive, legislative, and judicial institutions of liberal democracies around the world. Aim is to provide students with an insight into the consequences and mechanisms of various institutions, and to analyze challenges to established and fledgling liberal democracies. An additional objective is to make students familiar with the institutional setup of liberal democracies in: Latin America, Asia, and Europe (incl. EU)

Course Number: AS.191.302.21

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Fabian Bauwens

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 2

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

R - 9 - 11:30 AM

Introduction to International Relations through Comics

This course will present an overview of the different theories in the discipline of International Relations. The course will be organized around the question of the causes of conflict between and within states. A special emphasis will be given on reading primary literature. By the end of the course students should be well versed in the main approaches in the discipline.

Course Number: AS.191.325.21

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Tarek Tutunji

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 4 PM

T - 2 - 4 PM

W - 2 - 4 PM

R - 2 - 4 PM

The Politics of Intellectual Property*

Encompassing artistic works, scientific inventions, indigenous traditional knowledge, and much more, intellectual property (IP) has become a significant concern of politicians and policymakers at the domestic and international level. This course will explore some of central the legal, ethical, and policy questions surrounding intellectual property, including debates about scope and enforcement of IP rights, balancing IP rights against public access to information and medicines, and the role of IP in economic development. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.191.341.21

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Gary Jones

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 4:30 PM

T - 2 - 4:30 PM

R - 2 - 4:30 PM

American Constitutionalism & War-Making*

This course explores the issue of security in the United States beginning with the 1787 constitutional founding and moving into the modern era. We will examine the role of the United States in world politics with a special emphasis on how the United States, as well as the international system changed in the 20th century, as well as the domestic constitutional challenges this presented.

Course Number: AS.191.352.11

Distribution: S W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Ryan Fried

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

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PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

Oral Presentations

This course is designed to help students push through any anxieties about public speaking by immersing them in a practice-intensive environment. They learn how to speak with confidence in a variety of formats and venues - Including extemporaneous speaking, job interviewing, leading a discussion, presenting a technical speech, and other relevant scenarios.

Course Number: EN.661.150.21

Distribution: W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Julie Reiser

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

T - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Blogging & Online Writing

This course will teach students how to develop, write, and manage content for social media. In this highly experiential course, students will design, create, and market their own blog; and manage the content creation process for a collaborative class project. The course will emphasize best practices for search engine optimization (SEO), intuitive visual design, social media metrics, and content management strategies appropriate for publishing, marketing, and other relevant environments.

Course Number: EN.661.154.21

Distribution: W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Julie Reiser

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 AM - 12 PM

T - 9:30 AM - 12 PM

R - 9:30 AM - 12 PM

Online Media & Society

This online course takes a comprehensive and critical view of the history, roles and responsibilities of media in society. It explores the organization, creation, economics, control and effects of mass communications in the United States and the world. Students will learn how both traditional and new digital media has come to play such an integral role in our society while exploring the exciting career opportunities in journalism, public relations, advertising, radio, film, TV and the Internet. Students will apply concepts to current practical examples through a course blog and delve more deeply into subjects through writing assignments. No on-campus components required. No audits. * Prerequisites: One writing course in any discipline.

Course Number: EN.661.160.21

Distribution:

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Keith Quesenberry

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - Online

T - Online

W - Online

R - Online

F - Online

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PSYCHOLOGICAL & BRAIN SCIENCES

Mini-Term: Origins of Social Cognition

Infants are remarkably social creatures, even from birth. This course will review and synthesize findings in the emerging field of social cognitive development. Topics include infants' recognition of social agents, understanding others' intentions, production of helping behavior, development of moral reasoning, etc. The ultimate goal of this course is to understand the development of social knowledge and behavior, focusing on the first two years of life.

Course Number: AS.200.126.73

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Aimee Stahl

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Term: Mini-Term III

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 -11:15 AM

T - 9:30 -11:15 AM

W - 9:30 -11:15 AM

R - 9:30 -11:15 AM

F - 9:30 -11:15 AM

Childhood Disorders/Treatments: Online

This is an online course. The class will meet for ten weeks from May 27 to August 1 and will follow the deadlines for Term I for add/drop/withdraw and grade changes. This course examines the psychological disorders that are usually first diagnosed prior to adulthood. Some of the specific disorders that will be discussed are Attention-Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders, Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Learning Disorders and Mental Retardation. Students will become familiar with various diagnoses, etiologies, and methods of treatment.

Course Number: AS.200.162.87

Distribution: S

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Ann Jarema

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

Cognitive Development*

How do children acquire knowledge about the world? In this course, we will explore how children understand the world, looking at concepts of objects, number, space, and other people. Students will read both empirical and theoretical writing on these topics, participate in class discussions, and complete short critical writing assignments and final literature review paper.

Course Number: AS.200.339.11

Distribution: N S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Melissa Kibbe

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

Forensic Psychology Soup to Nuts

The course is based upon an integrative strategy that focuses upon: (1) scientific research underlying forensic psychology expertise, (2) the formulation of expert opinions, and (3) the presentation of expert witness testimony court cases. The course syllabus identifies examples from insanity defense that raises research questions answered by studies from psychology that focus on: battered spouse syndrome, sleep disorders/criminal behavior, pedophilia, settled psychosis, and the application of death penalty to juveniles or mentally ill persons. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.200.360.11

Distribution: S

Campus:

Instructor: Lawrence Raifman

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 10 - 12:30 PM

T - 10 - 12:30 PM

R - 10 - 12:30 PM

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PUBLIC HEALTH STUDIES

Applied Geographic Info Systems in Public Health

Course provides an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and presents its utility in public health. Provides exposure to GIS as a tool for describing the magnitude of health problems, and for supporting quantitative methods in public health decision-making. Course topics include a historical overview of the intersection between geography and public health; current epidemiological use of GIS; experiential learning (thematic mapping of health phenomena that students observe in the field); and geospatial analysis of public health problems.

Course Number: AS.280.222.21

Distribution: Q S

Campus:

Instructor: Bonnie Wittstadt

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 1:30 - 4 PM

W - 1:30 - 4 PM

F - 1:30 - 4 PM

Health, Homelessness & Social Justice

Homelessness is bad for one’s health, and its existence, persistence and growth demonstrates deep policy failures and social ills. The course examines issues fundamental to the modern phenomena of homelessness in the U.S. – and the connection between disparate health and desperate inequality. Through presentations and discussions with community experts, class participants will better understand the causes and experiences of homelessness, and the connections between health and housing status. The course will examine methods for addressing the immediate health needs of people who lack housing as well as strategies for changing the social structures responsible for creating homelessness within the context of theories of social justice.

Course Number: AS.280.224.21

Distribution: N S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Adam Schneider

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 5:30 - 8 PM

T - 5:30 - 8 PM

R - 5:30 - 8 PM

Mini-Term: Urban Environments and Public Health

Introduction to physical and social environmental systems issues affecting the health of several marginalized populations (eg. immigrants, impoverished and homeless). The course will primarily use Baltimore as the field for experiential learning, and will incorporate cross-cultural discussions, a variety of readings, and guest lecturers from Hopkins faculty and industry experts. Course will meet for two weeks: from July 7th through 18th.

Course Number: AS.280.226.72

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Ana Rule

Credits: 3

Term: Mini-Term II

Days & Times:

M - 9 AM to 3PM

T - 9 – 12:00 PM

W - 9 AM to 3PM

R - 9 – 12:00 PM

F - 9 AM to 3PM

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SOCIOLOGY

Comparative Perspectives on Race & Ethnicity

This course is designed for students to explore the meanings and significance of race and ethnicity in different parts of the world. Students will learn to distinguish between race and ethnic concepts, and assess the impact of these processes on social relations, cultural identities, and structures of power and inequality within and across countries. The focus will be on understanding change and stability in race and ethnic relations as a result of forces such as, globalization, migration, and democracy in regions as diverse as North America, Europe, Asia, and Latin America. Each week will be dedicated to a different region of the world, and readings, assignments, and discussions will offer opportunities to engage with the literature and to reflect on real life case studies and examples. The first week will open with reflections about race in the United States both before and after Obama. Subsequent weeks will turn to themes such as, immigration debates in Europe and Asia, the politics

Course Number: AS.230.234.21

Distribution: S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Anne-Marie Livingstone

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

W - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

R - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

Sociology and Film

Do films merely mirror society, or do they in fact shape societal experience? This class will investigate these questions through a filmic analysis of sociological issues. We will consider both narrative and documentary films and use them to engage in sociological questions of class, race, and gender. We will discuss what the historical and current trends in film making and film subject say about society, and how these trends may in turn influence society.

Course Number: AS.230.237.11

Distribution: H S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Elizabeth Talbert

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 4 PM

W - 1 - 4 PM

R - 1 - 4 PM

Mini-Term: Chinese Political Economy

We will examine the major transformations of the Chinese political economy from the eighteenth century up until the present by looking at the decline of the Chinese economy, the attempts to reverse this decline in the Republican and the Maoist periods, and the dynamics behind the rise of the Chinese economy in recent decades. The course will cover several themes including the class structure, inequality, government policies, urban-rural dynamics, regional variations, human capital, infrastructure, innovation, liberalization, and the relationship with the world economy.

Course Number: AS.230.358.73

Distribution: H S

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: BURAK GUREL

Credits: 1

Term: Mini-Term III

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 4:30 PM

T - 2 - 4:30 PM

W - 2 - 4:30 PM

R - 2 - 4:30 PM

F - 2 - 4:30 PM

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WRITING SEMINARS

Narrative Medicine

In this course, we'll explore the new field of narrative medicine. What role does storytelling play in medicine? How can studying the literature of illness and healing result in better patient care? Students will read and discuss a variety of narratives authored by both patients and physicians, from short stories to personal essays to poems. They will also examine research on the impact of narrative training on clinical practice, and meet guest speakers from the local medical community. Finally, students will craft their own essays and fiction and receive feedback in a workshop setting.

Course Number: AS.220.101.21

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Emily Parker

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

W - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

R - 10 AM- 12:30 PM

Make 'Em Laugh

The quickest way to kill a joke is to explain it. So how do we learn to be funny? In this class, we’ll explore techniques in humor writing. Whether poking holes in accepted absurdities or helping us laugh at death, humor makes us smile and think. Each week, we’ll focus on a different type of humor—dark comedy, satire, etc.—through stories, nonfiction, criticism, and author interviews. Students will write imitations and original work. * Prerequisites: IFP I preferred but not required

Course Number: AS.220.138.11

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Gwen Kirby

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

Portraits of the Artists: Writing Self in Fiction

Flannery O’Connor once said “Anybody who has survived his childhood has enough information about life to last him the rest of his days.” Fiction is a carefully hewn combination of memory and imagination, and while it is impossible to know how much of the literary canon is sourced in autobiography, the truism holds firm: people write what they know. In this course, we will focus on modern and contemporary autobiographical fiction, looking closely at source, creative process, craft, and style, in order to answer the essential question, How does a writer successfully roll fact into fiction? Students will complete writing activities and participate in discussions and workshops. They will produce either an autobiographical story, or the first chapter of a longer work. Novels: Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Joyce; The Bell Jar, Plath; The Lover, Duras. Stories by Hemingway, Updike, Munro, O'Brien, Casey.

Course Number: AS.220.148.11

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jocelyn Slovak

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

F - 1 - 3:30 PM

Introduction to Formal Poetry

Robert Frost said writing free verse is like playing tennis with the net down. This course will focus on the supporting structures of poetry—such as meter and rhyme—and provide students with the opportunity to study, write, and workshop a variety of verse-forms including the villanelle, ghazal, and sestina. In addition to selections from Paul Fussell’s Poetic Meter & Poetic Form, students will read a range of formal poems. By the end of the course, students will understand Frost's insight, and, having practiced the art of meter, be better prepared to write “free verse.” * Prerequisites: Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I & II

Course Number: AS.220.149.11

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Callie Siskel

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 9 - 11:30 AM

W - 9 - 11:30 AM

F - 9 - 11:30 AM

Steal This Book

From Spike Lee to The Clash, art can wield immense influence on our worldview. This class will explore the intersection of social critique and American literature. Class texts will also include a range of pertinent films, documentaries, and popular music. We'll examine the social utility of art and how artists use their craft to make a statement. Classwork includes Blackboard posts on current events, weekly creative writing assignments, and a final portfolio of creative work.

Course Number: AS.220.150.21

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Joselyn Takacs

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

W - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

F - 9:30 - 12:00 PM

Words of Light: Poetry and Photography

This class will focus on poetry's relationship to time and the visual. Students will read a body of poetry and criticism (essays by Walter Benjamin, Susan Sontag, Penelope Pelizzon, et al.) looking at how the descriptive nature of lyric poetry is fundamentally related to photography -- more closely related to photography, in fact, than poetry is to painting or sculpture. In addition to bringing a worthwhile discussion of the readings to each class, students will submit one original poem and one original photo each week for credit. "IFP 1 preferred."

Course Number: AS.220.152.21

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Songmuang Greer

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Term: II

Days & Times:

M - 2 - 4:15 PM

W - 2 - 4:15 PM

R - 2 - 4:15 PM

Writing from Art

In this course, students will engage with ekphrastic writing across genres. Using poetry, fiction, and personal essays inspired by Joseph Cornell's boxes as an entry point, we will consider how writers engage with other forms of art. Students will develop and workshop each others responses. Readings include Charles Simic, William Gibson, Mark Doty, and selections from Jonathan Safran Foer's anthology of Cornell-based writing, "A Convergence of Birds."

Course Number: AS.220.153.11

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Julia Heney

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1 - 3:30 PM

W - 1 - 3:30 PM

R - 1 - 3:30 PM

Fitzgerald's Short Stories

An examination of F. Scott Fitzgerald's major short stories in the 1920s and 1930s. We'll analyze Fitzgerald's commitment to exploring the tension between two opposing intellectual movements: literary naturalism (which championed the primacy of environmental determinism) and literary realism (which championed the primacy of free will). We'll trace Fitzgerald's mercurial loyalty to each movement: his abandonment of one school of thought for the other, from one year to the next. In "May Day" he even embraced both movements equally—testimony to his belief that "the test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function". Did Fitzgerald ultimately advocate one school of thought over the other? Or, did he intend simply to stage the debate between them?

Course Number: AS.220.195.11

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: John Rockefeller V

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 6 - 8:30 PM

W - 6 - 8:30 PM

F - 6 - 8:30 PM

Introduction to Dramatic Writing: Film

Screenwriting workshop. This course will look at the screenplay as both a literary text and blue-print for production. Several classic screenplay texts will be analyzed. Students will then embark on their own scripts. We will intensively focus on character development, creating "believable" cinematic dialogue, plot development, conflict, pacing, dramatic foreshadowing, the element of surprise, text and subtext, and visual story-telling. Several classic film will be closely analyzed and discussed (PSYCHO, CHINATOWN, BLADE RUNNER). Students will learn professional screenplay format and write an 8-12 page screenplay that will be read in class and discussed.

Course Number: AS.220.204.11

Distribution: H W

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Marc Lapadula

Credits: 3

Term: I

Days & Times:

M - 1:30 - 5:15PM

W - 1:30 - 5:15PM

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Meet the Faculty
John D. Rockefeller V

John D. Rockefeller V, Ph.D.

Dr. Rockefeller lectures for The Writing Seminars.

Mark Blyth

Marek Cieplak, Ph.D.

Dr. Marek Cieplak is involved in experimental and theoretical studies of proteins.

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