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Distribution (Dist.) Abbreviations
E: Engineering Science, N: Natural Science, Q: Quantitative Studies, H: Humanistic Studies, S: Social & Behavioral Studies, W: Writing Intensive

 

* Courses with an asterisk following the title are not open to Pre-College students.

 

Summer 2017 Offerings:

* Summer 2017 courses displayed below. Check back soon for 2018 listings.

APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS

Mathematics of Music

This course aims to promote students’ understanding of some important mathematical concepts by focusing on music and the sounds made by musical instruments as an area of mathematical application. Students will be exposed to basic concepts in mathematics including Fourier series, linear algebra, fundamental ideas from signal processing, and stochastic process models. The structure, organization, and synthesis of sounds and combinations of sounds will be explored. * Prerequisites: High School Mathematics (Calculus not needed)

Course Number: EN.550.105.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Daniel Naiman

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 11am - 1245pm

T - 11am - 1245pm

W - 11am - 1245pm

R - 11am - 1245pm

Statistical Analysis I*

First semester of a general survey of statistical methodology. Topics include descriptive statistics, introductory probability, conditional probability, random variables, expectation, sampling, the central limit theorem, classical and robust estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Case studies from psychology, epidemiology, economics and other fields serve to illustrate the underlying theory. Some use of Minitab, Excel or R, but no prior computing experience is necessary. Recommended Course Background: four years of high school mathematics. Students who may wish to undertake more than two semesters of probability and statistics should consider EN.550.420-EN.550.430. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics

Course Number: EN.550.111.11

Distribution: Q E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Fred Torcaso

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 3-530pm

T - 3-530pm

W - 3-530pm

R - 3-530pm

Statistical Analysis II*

Second semester of a general survey of statistical methodology. Topics include least squares, regression and analysis of variance, correlation, nonparametric methods, analysis of categorical data, contingency tables and chi-square tests, the likelihood concept, and Bayesian inference. * Prerequisites: EN.550.111 or EN.550.113 or AS.230.205 or AS.280.345 or credit for AP Statistics * Prerequisites: EN.550.111 or EN.550.113 or AS.230.205 or AS.280.345 or credit for AP Statistics

Course Number: EN.550.112.21

Distribution: Q E

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Long Wang

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:00-11:30am

T - 9:00-11:30am

W - 9:00-11:30am

R - 9:00-11:30am

Discrete Mathematics

Introduction to the mathematics of finite systems. Logic; Boolean algebra; induction and recursion; sets, functions, relations, equivalence, and partially ordered sets; elementary combinatorics; modular arithmetic and the Euclidean algorithm; group theory; permutations and symmetry groups; graph theory. Selected applications. The concept of a proof and development of the ability to recognize and construct proofs are part of the course. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics

Course Number: EN.550.171.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Elizabeth Reiland

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1:00-3:30PM

T - 1:00-3:30PM

W - 1:00-3:30PM

R - 1:00-3:30PM

Introduction to Biostatistics

A self-contained course covering various data analysis methods used in the life sciences. Topics include types of experimental data, numerical and graphical descriptive statistics, concepts of (and distinctions between) population and sample, basic probability, fitting curves to experimental data (regression analysis), comparing groups in populations (analysis of variance), methods of modeling probability (contingency tables and logistic regression). * Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics. * Prerequisites: 3 years of high school mathematics

Course Number: EN.550.230.21

Distribution: Q E

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Prashant Athavale

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:00-11:30am

T - 9:00-11:30am

W - 9:00-11:30am

R - 9:00-11:30am

Probability and Statistics*

An introduction to probability and statistics at the calculus level, intended for engineering and science students planning to take only one course on the topics. Combinatorial probability, independence, conditional probability, random variables, expectation and moments, limit theory, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, tests of means and variances, goodness-of-fit. Recommended co-requisite: multivariable calculus. Students cannot receive credit for both 550.310 and 550.311. Students cannot receive credit for 550.310 after having received credit for 550.420 or 550.430. * Prerequisites: Calculus I and II * Prerequisites: Calculus I and Calculus II

Course Number: EN.550.310.11

Distribution: Q E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Prashant Athavale

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

T - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

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ART

Landscape Photography

In this course students will experience the drama and beauty of the urban and rural landscape. On numerous field trips they will hone their camera technique as well as learn elements of composition and develop a personal style. Students will learn the fundamentals of Photoshop and they will also be introduced to the beauty of black and white in Silver Efex software. DSLR cameras provided.

Course Number: AS.371.166.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Phyllis Berger

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 920am-1230pm

R - 920am-1230pm

F - 920am-1230pm

Design Studies: Detail, Product, Prototype.

When we undertake the design of an artifact—something material, perhaps interactive—we do more than create a pretty little sculpture, or simply enclose the inner workings of a product. We think about aesthetics; about ergonomics; about material heft and surface texture. In a successful product, toy, or building detail it is often something ineffable—the way the object interfaces with the human hand, or the way it takes on a personality in the mind—that results in its success as an object of design. The course is structured as a series of design exercises, each intended to develop the graphical and manual skill-set of the designer. Our subject, broadly speaking, is the design of small things: from building details to useful products and tools, the act of drawing iterative design sketches, and creating prototypes, will guide us in the development of practical design intelligence.

Course Number: AS.371.177.11

Distribution: H

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: charles phinney

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 9am-1230pm

R - 9am-1230pm

Documentary Photography

In this course, we will explore different genres of documentary photography including: the fine art document, photojournalism, social documentary photography, the photo essay and photography of propaganda. Field trips offer opportunities to work in the field. Students will work on a semester-long photo-documentary project on a subject of their choice. Camera experience is a plus, but not a prerequisite. Students will be loaned a digital SLR for the semester.

Course Number: AS.371.303.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Phyllis Berger

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 2-5pm

W - 2-5pm

R - 2-5pm

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BIOLOGY

Mini-Term: Techniques in Molecular Biology

This course is designed to supplement the scientific classroom experience of students by providing hands on experience with the essential core molecular biology techniques of bacterial DNA cloning, DNA analysis, and protein analysis. Students will be able to understand and explain how these methodologies work scientifically and will develop the basic laboratory skills necessary for the successful completion of the assays. * Prerequisites: Solid background in biology

Course Number: AS.020.126.71

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term I

Dates: June 25 - July 8

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: James Gordy

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 2-530pm

T - 2-530pm

W - 2-530pm

R - 2-530pm

F - 2-530pm

Mini-Term: Techniques in Molecular Biology

This course is designed to supplement the scientific classroom experience of students by providing hands on experience with the essential core molecular biology techniques of bacterial DNA cloning, DNA analysis, and protein analysis. Students will be able to understand and explain how these methodologies work scientifically and will develop the basic laboratory skills necessary for the successful completion of the assays. * Prerequisites: Solid background in biology

Course Number: AS.020.126.72

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term II

Dates: July 9 - July 22

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: James Gordy

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 2-5pm

T - 2-5pm

W - 2-5pm

R - 2-5pm

F - 2-5pm

Mini-Term: Techniques in Molecular Biology

This course is designed to supplement the scientific classroom experience of students by providing hands on experience with the essential core molecular biology techniques of bacterial DNA cloning, DNA analysis, and protein analysis. Students will be able to understand and explain how these methodologies work scientifically and will develop the basic laboratory skills necessary for the successful completion of the assays. * Prerequisites: Solid background in biology

Course Number: AS.020.126.73

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term III

Dates: July 23 - August 5

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: James Gordy

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 2-5pm

T - 2-5pm

W - 2-5pm

R - 2-5pm

F - 2-5pm

Phage Research

Have you ever discovered a novel form of life? Care to contribute to an ongoing research program and start establishing your scientific legacy? Students will isolate and characterize novel bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) from the environment using modern molecular biological techniques. Includes training in lab safety, and sterile technique. This course is open to JHU and visiting undergraduates as well as rising seniors and rising undergraduate freshmen only. The charge for this lab course is $2000.00.

Course Number: AS.020.137.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Joel Schildbach

Credits: 2

Days & Times:

M - 930-1130am

T - 930-1130am

W - 930-1130am

R - 930-1130am

F - 930-1130am

Introduction to Biological Molecules

This course presents an overview to biochemistry and molecular biology, especially focusing on biotechnology and medicine. Students will have classroom (MWF 9am-11:30am) and laboratory (T 9am012:00pm) experience and group presentations. Prerequisite: High school level Chemistry and Biology (both with a grade of A). * Prerequisites: High School Biology and Chemistry (Both with a grade of A ).

Course Number: AS.020.205.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Richard Shingles

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9:00am-11:30am

T - 9:00am-11:30am

W - 9:00am-11:30am

F - 9:00am-11:30am

Introduction to Biological Molecules

This course presents an overview to biochemistry and molecular biology, especially focusing on biotechnology and medicine. Students will have classroom and laboratory experience and group presentations. Prerequisite: High school level Chemistry and Biology (both with a grade of A). * Prerequisites: High School Biology and Chemistry (Both with a grade of A ).

Course Number: AS.020.205.22

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Richard Shingles

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-330pm

W - 1-330pm

R - 1-330pm

F - 1-330pm

Biochemistry*

The molecules responsible for the life processes of animals, plants and microbes will be examined. The structures, biosynthesis, degradation and interconversion of the major cellular constituents including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids will illustrate the similarity of the biomolecules and metabolic processes involved in diverse forms of life. * Prerequisites: AS.030.205-206 Introductory Organic Chemistry I & II, or AS.030.212 Honors Organic Chemistry.

Course Number: AS.020.305.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Robert Horner

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:15am

T - 9-11:15am

W - 9-11:15am

R - 9-11:15am

F - 9-11:15am

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BIOPHYSICS

Introduction to Computing

Course introduces students to the use of computers for applications in many areas (natural and social sciences, humanities, and engineering). Students will obtain basic computing skills and tools, including familiarity with UNIX, with the use of complex UNIX commands (e.g grep, awk, sed) and shell scripts, with the Python programming language, with graphing software and with a package for numerical and statistical computing, such as Mathematica or Matlab. Brief lectures with extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines.

Course Number: AS.250.205.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Maria Procopio

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9am-1215pm

W - 9am-1215pm

F - 9am-1215pm

Protein Biochemistry and Engineering Laboratory

An entry-level project laboratory where students will use the techniques of protein engineering to attempt to modify existing proteins to endow them with new structural or physical properties. This course will provide an introduction to standard biochemistry laboratory practice and to protein science, including experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification and characterization of structure and stability. * Prerequisites: NONE

Course Number: AS.250.253.11

Distribution: N W

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Bertrand Garcia-Moreno

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1:00pm-5:30pm

W - 1:00pm-5:30pm

F - 1:00pm-5:30pm

Protein Biochemistry and Engineering Laboratory - WAITLIST ONLY

An entry-level project laboratory where students will use the techniques of protein engineering to attempt to modify existing proteins to endow them with new structural or physical properties. This course will provide an introduction to standard biochemistry laboratory practice and to protein science, including experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification and characterization of structure and stability. * Prerequisites: NONE

Course Number: AS.250.253.21

Distribution: N W

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Bertrand Garcia-Moreno

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1:00pm-5:30pm

W - 1:00pm-5:30pm

F - 1:00pm-5:30pm

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CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING

Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Lab

This course challenges students with laboratory projects that are not well-defined. Students work in groups to develop an effective approach to experiments. They identify the important operating variables, decide how best to obtain them using measured or calculated values. Based on their results they predict, carryout, analyze and improve experiments. Each student analyzes at least two of the following biomolecular projects: bioreactor, biocatalysis and membrane separation and one of the projects in EN.540.311. In addition to technical objectives, this course stresses oral and written communication. Students will have additional meeting times with the instructors and some writing professors outside of class.

Course Number: EN.540.313.11

Distribution: E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lise Dahuron & Julie Reiser

Credits: 6

Days & Times:

T - 1-6pm

F - 1-6pm

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CHEMISTRY

Introductory Chemistry I

The fundamental principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, elementary thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, kinetics, and transition metal chemistry are introduced in this course. To be taken with Introductory Chemistry Laboratory unless lab has been previously completed. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. High school physics and calculus are strongly recommended as prerequisites. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. Pre-College enrollment requires instructor permission. * Prerequisites: Pre-College requires instructor permission.

Course Number: AS.030.101.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: Sunita Thyagarajan

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 930-1130am

T - 930-1130am

R - 930-1130am

F - 930-1130am

Introductory Chemistry II*

The fundamental principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, elementary thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, kinetics, and transition metal chemistry are introduced in this course. To be taken with Introductory Chemistry Laboratory unless lab has been previously completed. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. High school physics and calculus are strongly recommended as prerequisites. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: AS 030.101 or equivalent

Course Number: AS.030.102.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus:

Instructor: Jane Greco

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9am-11am

T - 9am-11am

R - 9am-11am

F - 9am-11am

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I

Laboratory work includes some quantitative analysis and the measurement of physical properties. Open only to those who are registered for or have successfully completed Introductory Chemistry 030.101. * Prerequisites: Pre-College requires instructor permission, 030.101 co-requisite or prerequisite

Course Number: AS.030.105.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: Louise Pasternack

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1p-350p

T - 1p-350p

R - 1p-350p

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II*

Laboratory work includes some quantitative analysis and the measurement of physical properties. Open only to those who are concurrently registered for or have completed Introductory Chemistry Lecture II. Recommended Course Background: AS.030.105 or equivalent. * Prerequisites: AS.030.105 or equivalent

Course Number: AS.030.106.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus:

Instructor: Louise Pasternack

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1:00-4:00PM

T - 1:00-4:00PM

R - 1:00-4:00PM

Introductory Organic Chemistry I*

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics include interrelationships of structure, physical properties, synthesis, and reactions and their mechanisms as well as a brief overview of bio-organic chemistry. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: Introductory Chemistry or the equivalent. * Prerequisites: Prerequisite: Introductory Chemistry or the equivalent.

Course Number: AS.030.205.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: Christopher Falzone

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:00-11:30AM

T - 9:00-11:30AM

W - 9:00-11:30AM

R - 9:00-11:30AM

F - 9:00-11:30AM

Introductory Organic Chemistry II*

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics include interrelationships of structure, physical properties, synthesis, and reactions and their mechanisms as well as a brief overview of bio-organic chemistry. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: Introductory Chemistry or the equivalent.

Course Number: AS.030.206.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Eric Hill

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:00-11:30 AM

T - 9:00-11:30 AM

W - 9:00-11:30 AM

R - 9:00-11:30 AM

F - 9:00-11:30 AM

Problem Solving Methodology in Organic Chemistry I*

This course will focus on the skills and strategies often utilized for solving problems in organic chemistry. In a seminar-style format, we will focus on a variety of strategies and techniques that students are otherwise expected to discover independently. This optional course is designed to help students succeed in Organic Chemistry I. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis, and is designed to be fun (believe it or not). Students work together in groups to solve challenging problems, focusing on the strategies necessary to solve each problem. This course is not required in order to succeed in Organic Chemistry I, but students in the past have found it to be helpful in guiding their study efforts for Organic Chemistry I. * Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to students registered in current Organic Chemistry term.

Course Number: AS.030.207.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: Christopher Falzone

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 2

Days & Times:

T - 1:00-3:30pm

R - 1:00-3:30pm

Problem Solving Methodology in Organic Chemistry II*

This course will focus on the skills and strategies often utilized for solving problems in organic chemistry. In a seminar-style format, we will focus on a variety of strategies and techniques that students are otherwise expected to discover independently. This optional course is designed to help students succeed in Organic Chemistry II. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis, and is designed to be fun (believe it or not). Students work together in groups to solve challenging problems, focusing on the strategies necessary to solve each problem. This course is not required in order to succeed in Organic Chemistry II, but students in the past have found it to be helpful in guiding their study efforts for Organic Chemistry II. * Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to students registered in current Organic Chemistry term.

Course Number: AS.030.208.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus:

Instructor: Eric Hill

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 2

Days & Times:

T - 1-4pm

R - 1-4pm

Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory*

Laboratory work includes fundamental laboratory techniques and preparation of representative organic compounds. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Organic Chemistry. Note: This one-semester course is offered each term. Introductory Organic Chemistry I/II requires one semester of the laboratory.

Course Number: AS.030.225.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: Thomas Lectka

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 12-4pm

T - 12-4pm

W - 12-4pm

R - 12-4pm

F - 12-4pm

Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory*

Laboratory work includes fundamental laboratory techniques and preparation of representative organic compounds. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Organic Chemistry. Note: This one-semester course is offered each term. Introductory Organic Chemistry I/II requires one semester of the laboratory.

Course Number: AS.030.225.12

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: Thomas Lectka

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 12-4pm

T - 12-4pm

W - 12-4pm

R - 12-4pm

F - 12-4pm

Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory*

Laboratory work includes fundamental laboratory techniques and preparation of representative organic compounds. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Organic Chemistry. Note: This one-semester course is offered each term. Introductory Organic Chemistry I/II requires one semester of the laboratory.

Course Number: AS.030.225.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus:

Instructor: Thomas Lectka

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 4-8pm

T - 4-8pm

W - 4-8pm

R - 4-8pm

F - 4-8pm

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

Intermediate Programming

This course teaches intermediate to advanced programming, using C and C++. (Prior knowledge of these languages is not expected.) We will cover low-level programming techniques, as well as object-oriented class design, and the use of class libraries. Specific topics include pointers, dynamic memory allocation, polymorphism, overloading, inheritance, templates, collections, exceptions, and others as time permits. Students are expected to learn syntax and some language specific features independently. Course work involves significant programming projects in both languages. * Prerequisites: 600.107 or 600.112 or AP Computer Science.

Course Number: EN.600.120.11

Distribution: E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Peter Froehlich

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

T - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

F - 1-3:30PM

Data Structures

This course covers the design, implementation and efficiencies of data structures and associated algorithms, including arrays, stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, heaps, balanced trees and graphs. Other topics include sorting, hashing, Java generics, and unit testing. Course work involves both written homework and Java programming assignments. * Prerequisites: EN.600.107 or EN.600.120 or equivalent

Course Number: EN.600.226.21

Distribution: Q E

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Anwar Mamat

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 3:00-5:30PM

T - 3:00-5:30PM

R - 3:00-5:30PM

F - 3:00-5:30PM

Introduction to Programming in Java

This course introduces fundamental structured and object-oriented programming concepts and techniques, using Java, and is intended for all who plan to use computer programming in their studies and careers. Topics covered include variables, arithmetic operators, control structures, arrays, functions, recursion, dynamic memory allocation, files, class usage and class writing. Program design and testing are also covered, in addition to more advanced object-oriented concepts including inheritance and exceptions as time permits. First-time programmers are strongly advised to take 600.108 concurrently in Fall/Spring semesters. WEBNOTES Summer only: Course homework involves significant programming (15-20 hours/wk). Attendance and participation is required. * Prerequisites: Familiarity with using computers.

Course Number: EN.601.107.21

Distribution: E

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Joanne Selinski

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 930am-12pm

T - 930am-12pm

R - 930am-12pm

F - 930am-12pm

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ECONOMICS

Elements of Macroeconomics

This course introduces the basic tools of macroeconomics and teaches how they are applied to real world economic policy. Throughout the course, the main goals will be to a) study economic aggregates such as the overall price level; the unemployment rate and the GDP b)understand how they relate to each other. Attention will be given to fiscal and monetary policies. We will also analyze the recent financial crisis and its impact on the economic activity.

Course Number: AS.180.101.11

Distribution: S

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: Emmanuel Garcia-Morales

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 9:00-11:30am

W - 9:00-11:30am

R - 9:00-11:30am

Elements of Macroeconomics

This course introduces the basic tools of macroeconomics and teaches how they are applied to real world economic policy. Throughout the course, the main goals will be to a) study economic aggregates such as the overall price level; the unemployment rate and the GDP b)understand how they relate to each other. Attention will be given to fiscal and monetary policies. We will also analyze the recent financial crisis and its impact on the economic activity.

Course Number: AS.180.101.21

Distribution: S

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus:

Instructor: Derin Aksit

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 8-1015am

W - 8-1015am

R - 8-1015am

Elements of Microeconomics

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems. * Prerequisites: Basic algebra and ability to read and draw graphs.

Course Number: AS.180.102.11

Distribution: S

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: Jianhui Li

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 930am-12pm

T - 930am-12pm

R - 930am-12pm

Elements of Microeconomics

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.  * Prerequisites: Student should be comfortable with basic algebra & graphs

Course Number: AS.180.102.21

Distribution: S

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus:

Instructor: Yun Gong

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 8-1015am

W - 8-1015am

R - 8-1015am

International Monetary Economics

This course presents International Monetary Economics theory and applies it towards gaining an understanding of recent events and current policy issues. The theory presented in this course covers a broad range of topics including exchange rate determination, monetary and fiscal policy in an open economy, balance of payments crises, the choice of exchange rate systems, and international debt. The insights provided by these theoretical frameworks will enable us to discuss topics such as the current global financial crisis, global financial imbalances, the Chinese exchange rate regime, and proposed changes in the international financial architecture.

Course Number: AS.180.242.21

Distribution: S

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Sung Ah-Bahk

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 930am-12pm

T - 930am-12pm

R - 930am-12pm

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP & MANAGEMENT

Introduction to Business

This course is designed as an introduction to the terms, concepts, and values of business and management. The course comprises three broad categories: the economic, financial, and corporate context of business activities; the organization and management of business enterprises; and, the marketing and production of goods and services. Topic specific readings, short case studies and financial exercises all focus on the bases for managerial decisions as well as the long and short-term implications of those decisions in a global environment. No audits.

Course Number: EN.660.105.21

Distribution: S W

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lawrence Aronhime

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:45am

T - 9-11:45am

W - 9-11:45am

R - 9-11:45am

Financial Accounting

This course will meet for the first time on Tuesday, May 31st. The course in Financial Accounting is designed for anyone who could be called upon to analyze and/or communicate financial results and/or make effective financial decisions in a for-profit business setting. No prior accounting knowledge or skill is required for successful completion of this course. Because accounting is described as the language of business, this course emphasizes the vocabulary, methods, and processes by which all business transactions are communicated. The accounting cycle, basic business transactions, internal controls, and preparation and understanding of financial statements including balance sheets, statements of income and cash flows are covered. No audits.

Course Number: EN.660.203.87 (Online)

Distribution:

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Lawrence Aronhime

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

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FILM & MEDIA STUDIES

Storytelling for Film and Fiction

Through the analysis of narrative films, short fiction, myths, fairy tales, and ghost stories, and through the workshopping of their own creative writing, students will explore the art and science of "a good story well told." This course is an essential primer for upper-level screenwriting.

Course Number: AS.061.148.11

Distribution: H W

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lucy Bucknell

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 4-630pm

W - 4-630pm

R - 4-630pm

Screening Difference: Race in American Film

This course will explore how race and ethnicity have been represented in American film from the early 20th century to the present. Through in-class screenings, open discussion, and short, analytical written responses, students will learn the basics of film analysis and improve their critical thinking skills. No prior experience in film studies required.

Course Number: AS.061.213.21

Distribution: H W

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lucy Bucknell

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 4-630pm

W - 4-630pm

R - 4-630pm

Analyzing Popular Culture (Online)

This course provides an introduction to the critical analysis of popular culture through the major theoretical paradigms of media and cultural theory. The teaching method uses a combination of media studies and sociology to explore popular culture and is designed to encourage students to become more active critics. The course presents a range of media from contemporary popular music to film and television. Smaller subjects include the teen "pop" love song, the politics of representation, and the forming of subcultures. Course dates: 06/12/2017- 08/4/2017 * Prerequisites: N/A

Course Number: AS.061.222.85

Distribution: H W

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Meredith Ward

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

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GERMAN AND ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Online Spanish Elements II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and two hourly exams (no midterm and no final). Two textbooks are needed for the course, plus an access code to enter MySpanishLab from Pearson publishers. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.112.85

Distribution:

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

Italian Elements I Online

The aim of the course is to provide students with basic listening, reading, writing, speaking and interactional skills in the language. The course will be taught entirely online, and presence on campus is not required. Students should have access to a computer, high-speed internet connection, and a microphone.

Course Number: AS.210.151.85

Distribution:

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Alessandro Zannirato

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Italian Elements II Online

This is a continuation of the Italian Elements I course (AS210.151).The aim of the course is to provide students with basic listening, reading, writing, speaking and interactional skills in the language. The course will be taught entirely online, and presence on campus is not required. Students should have access to a computer, high-speed internet connection, and a microphone. * Prerequisites: 151 or Placement exam - Part I

Course Number: AS.210.152.87

Distribution:

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Alessandro Zannirato

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Intermediate Spanish I

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.211.85

Distribution: H

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

Online Intermediate Spanish II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.212.85

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Intermediate Italian I - Online

Taught in Italian. Course continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Italian Elements courses (listening, speaking, reading, writing) on topics of increasing complexity. Course adopts a continuous assessment system. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. class runs from: 05/30/2017 - 08/4/2017 * Prerequisites: AS210.152, or appropriate Placement exam score - Part 1

Course Number: AS.210.251.87

Distribution: H

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Alessandro Zannirato

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Intermediate Italian II - Online

Taught in Italian. Course continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Intermediate Italian I (listening, speaking, reading, writing) on topics of increasing complexity. Course adopts a continuous assessment system. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. class runs from: 05/30/2017 - 08/4/2017 * Prerequisites: AS210.251, or appropriate Placement exam score - Parts I and II

Course Number: AS.210.252.87

Distribution: H

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Alessandro Zannirato

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Advanced Spanish I

Advanced Spanish I is designed to improve the four skills: Reading, writing, listening and speaking, essential for communication. This third-year course aims to improve the students' reading and writing skills by focusing on various types of texts. Students will also engage in more formal levels of written communication. This course also focuses on refinement of grammar. Students are exposed to a deeper understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.*Prerequisites: Spanish Intermediate II or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score class runs from: 05/30/2017 - 08/4/2017 * Prerequisites: 210.212 or appropriate S-Cape score

Course Number: AS.210.311.85

Distribution: H

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

Online Advanced Spanish II

This third-year course aims at improving the students' oral skills by focusing on the use of standard, spoken Spanish with an emphasis on colloquial and idiomatic expressions. Students will also engage in more formal levels of communication by discussing assigned literary and non-literary topics. They will increase their listening skills through movies and other listening comprehension exercises. The course will also focus on vocabulary acquisition. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: 210.311 (Advanced Spanish) or appropriate placement exam score

Course Number: AS.210.312.85

Distribution: H

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

Spanish Language Practicum Online*

Prerequisites - AS 210.411 The Spanish Language Practicum involves a specially designed project, taking place some time within the summer period of 5/26-7/31, related to student's minor concentration. Provides an opportunity to use Spanish language in real world contexts. May be related to current employment context or developed in agencies or organizations that complement student's research and experimental background while contributing to the improvement of language proficiency. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Please see Dr. Sanchez in advance of registering for this course to discuss your project and timeline.

Course Number: AS.210.412.85

Distribution: H W

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

Mini- Term: Who thinks abstractly?: Fundamentals of Critical Theory

This course provides students with an introduction to foundational texts in the history of political thought. We will explore major concepts such as reason, right, and freedom. Students can expect to gain familiarity with works that have proven immensely influential in modern Europe and beyond, but will also be expected to consider ways in which such thinking has relevance for today’s world. Participation in discussions, and two short papers dealing directly with the ideas of two different thinkers will be required. All texts will be available through Blackboard.

Course Number: AS.213.319.73

Distribution: H

Term: Mini-Term III

Dates: July 23 - August 5

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jason Yonover

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 10am-12pm

T - 10am-12pm

W - 10am-12pm

R - 10am-12pm

F - 10am-12pm

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HUMANITIES CENTER

Marxist Theory of Consciousness: Class, Color, Creed, Gender

This course takes up the tripartite problematic of class as social context, ideology as false consciousness, and gender as the perception of sexual difference in modern society through philosophical engagements in Marxist tradition with consciousness. It will primarily treat the formation and validity of the individual's insight into her society as a whole. Our systematic and historical path runs through Marx, Georg Lukács, Adorno, Rosa Luxemburg, Althusser, Judith Butler. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.300.374.21

Distribution: H N E

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Omid Mehrgan

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 345-6pm

W - 345-6pm

F - 345-6pm

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INTERDEPARTMENTAL

Mini-Term:Neuroscience Applied: Designing and Communicating Theory and Research

Science is about theory, research, data and storytelling. This course focuses on Neuroscience and its related topics –Cognitive Science, Psychology, Biology, Computer Science, Philosophy of Mind and Anthropology– as they can be applied outside of the traditional laboratory. Through research projects on a topic of their choice, students will experience hands-on creative problem solving through the scientific process and create and write their own research papers and scientific visualizations. It is strongly recommended to take this course in conjunction with the course "Mind, Brain, and Beauty" or any other course in the brain, psychological and behavioral sciences. * Prerequisites: "Mind, Brain, and Beauty" or any other course in the brain, psychological and behavioral sciences

Course Number: AS.360.100.71

Distribution: N S W

Term: Mini-Term I

Dates: June 25 - July 8

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-3pm

T - 1-3pm

W - 1-3pm

R - 1-3pm

F - 1-3pm

Mini-Term: Neuroscience Applied: Designing and Communicating Theory and Research

Science is about theory, research, data and storytelling. This course focuses on Neuroscience and its related topics –Cognitive Science, Psychology, Biology, Computer Science, Philosophy of Mind and Anthropology– as they can be applied outside of the traditional laboratory. Through research projects on a topic of their choice, students will experience hands-on creative problem solving through the scientific process and create and write their own research papers and scientific visualizations. It is strongly recommended to take this course in conjunction with the course "Mind, Brain, and Beauty" or any other course in the brain, psychological and behavioral sciences. * Prerequisites: "Mind, Brain, and Beauty" or any other course in the brain, psychological and behavioral sciences

Course Number: AS.360.100.72

Distribution: N S

Term: Mini-Term II

Dates: July 9 - July 22

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-3pm

T - 1-3pm

W - 1-3pm

R - 1-3pm

F - 1-3pm

Discover Hopkins: Physiology & Disease: Renal, Digestive, Immune, Endocrinology, and Reproduction

An understanding of physiology is an invaluable part of any budding physician’s or scientist’s repertoire. This course introduces classical physiology in the human body, and how it functions in both health and disease. Part II of Physiology and Disease is the last of a two-part course, and though students are NOT required to take Part I, it should be a consideration! Ultimately, knowledge of basic physiology should impact future research and serve as a foundation for all future scientific and biomedical endeavors. Pre-Reqs: None

Course Number: AS.360.101.61

Distribution: N

Term: Discover Hopkins III

Dates: July 24 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Christopher Ciarleglio

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 930am-430pm

T - 930am-430pm

W - 930am-430pm

R - 930am-430pm

F - 930am-430pm

Mini-Term: Mind, Brain, and Beauty

What underlies our perception of visual art and music? Do specific properties of objects, scenes, and musical events evoke consistent emotional responses? Does the perception of beauty lie in the eye of the beholder? What can the creative, artistic process tell us about the mind/brain? Examining such questions from cognitive and computer sciences, neuroscience, psychology, and philosophy, we will explore relevant research, theory and data in the visual and auditory domains as they pertain to art perception and cognition, creativity, and artificial intelligence.

Course Number: AS.360.116.71

Distribution: N S

Term: Mini-Term I

Dates: June 25 - July 8

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 10am-12pm

T - 10am-12pm

W - 10am-12pm

R - 10am-12pm

F - 10am-12pm

Mini-Term: Mind, Brain and Beauty

What underlies our perception of visual art and music? Do specific properties of objects, scenes, and musical events evoke consistent emotional responses? Does the perception of beauty lie in the eye of the beholder? What can the creative, artistic process tell us about the mind/brain? Examining such questions from cognitive and computer sciences, neuroscience, psychology, and philosophy, we will explore relevant research, theory and data in the visual and auditory domains as they pertain to art perception and cognition, creativity, and artificial intelligence.

Course Number: AS.360.116.72

Distribution: N S

Term: Mini-Term II

Dates: July 9 - July 22

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 10am-12pm

T - 10am-12pm

W - 10am-12pm

R - 10am-12pm

F - 10am-12pm

Mini-Term: A Beautiful Medicine

Integrative medicine considers the human body not as a machine to be repaired when broken, but as a potent mind-body with extraordinary potential for high-level wellness, resilience under duress, and resistance to disease. Changing our disease-care model into a wellness model will be facilitated when we consider the vitality of soul and spirit to be as important as cellular function. We will explore a vision of medicine broader than that of the conventional model as it integrates the biological with the psychological aspects of human experience and focuses on the flourishing of human possibility. David Mercier, M.S., L.Ac., author of A Beautiful Medicine, winner of a Grand and Gold Prize in the 2013 Nautilus Book Awards, will be co-teaching this class with Medical Herbalist Geo Giordano, MSc, RH(AHG)

Course Number: AS.360.139.71

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term I

Dates: June 25 - July 8

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Georganne Giordano & David Mercier

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-3PM

T - 1-3PM

W - 1-3PM

R - 1-3PM

F - 1-3PM

Mini-Term: Edible Pharmacopeia

We will explore some of the commonly used herbal medicines which support our anatomy and physiology. One class will be devoted to pain management & the emerging use of Cannabinoids. JHU is currently performing a clinical trial on Mistletoe which we will be study, as it’s use is widespread for cancer patients in Europe. We will review current scientific discoveries explaining the cellular pathways and mechanisms that these plants affect in healing. Therapeutic doses, appropriate uses, plus known drug-herb interactions will be highlighted. Students will gain some useful insights into staying well, thinking clearly and optimizing their personal performance during their academic years ahead.

Course Number: AS.360.249.73

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term III

Dates: July 23 - August 5

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Georganne Giordano

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-3pm

T - 1-3pm

W - 1-3pm

R - 1-3pm

F - 1-3pm

Mini-Term:So you want to be a .... Dentist

Participation in all aspects of dentistry designed to immerse students in the experience of being a clinical dentist. The experience will focus on 5 elements for immersion: Chair-side monitoring throughout multiple dental specialties, dental anatomy/radiology review, dental laboratory work, sterilization and OHSA protocols, and business dental management discussion in the changing insurance landscape.

Course Number: AS.360.300.72

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term II

Dates: July 9 - July 22

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Peter Fuentes

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9-4

T - 9-4

W - 9-4

R - 9-4

F - 9-2

Mini-Term: So you want to be a ... Dentist

Participation in all aspects of dentistry designed to immerse students in the experience of being a clinical dentist. The experience will focus on 5 elements for immersion: Chair-side monitoring throughout multiple dental specialties, dental anatomy/radiology review, dental laboratory work, sterilization and OHSA protocols, and business dental management discussion in the changing insurance landscape.

Course Number: AS.360.300.73

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term III

Dates: July 23 - August 5

Campus:

Instructor: Peter Fuentes

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9-4

T - 9-4

W - 9-4

R - 9-4

F - 9-2

Education USA Academy: Two Week

Education USA 2 week placeholder description.

Course Number: XX.111.111.11

Distribution:

Term: TBD

Dates: July 23 - August 5

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor:

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

Education USA Academy: Four Week

Education USA 2 week placeholder description.

Course Number: XX.111.111.21

Distribution:

Term: TBD

Dates: July 23 - August 5

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor:

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

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MATHEMATICS

Introduction to Calculus

This course starts from scratch and provides students with all the background necessary for the study of calculus. It includes a review of algebra, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, coordinates and graphs. Each of these tools will be introduced in its cultural and historical context. The concept of the rate of change of a function will be introduced. Not open to students who have studied calculus in high school.

Course Number: AS.110.105.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Hanveen Koh

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-12pm

T - 9:30-12pm

W - 9:30-12pm

R - 9:30-12pm

Calculus I (Biology & Social Sciences)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, introduction to differential equations, functions of several variables, linear systems, applications for systems of linear differential equations, probability distributions. Many applications to the biological and social sciences will be discussed.

Course Number: AS.110.106.11

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Staff

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 10-12pm

T - 10-12pm

W - 10-12pm

R - 10-12pm

F - 10-12pm

Calculus II (Biology & Social Sciences)

Differential and integral Calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, introduction to differential equations, functions of several variables, linear systems, applications for systems of linear differential equations, probability distributions. Applications to the biological and social sciences will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.107.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Cheng Zhang

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1:00-3:30PM

T - 1:00-3:30PM

W - 1:00-3:30PM

R - 1:00-3:30PM

Calculus I (Physical Sciences & Engineering)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.108.11

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: James Murphy

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:00-11:30AM

T - 9:00-11:30AM

W - 9:00-11:30AM

R - 9:00-11:30AM

Calculus I (Physical Sciences & Engineering)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.108.22

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus:

Instructor: Emmett Wymann

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-12PM

T - 9:30-12PM

W - 9:30-12PM

R - 9:30-12PM

Calculus II (Physical Sciences & Engineering)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.109.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus:

Instructor: Zehua Zhao

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:00am-11:30am

T - 9:00am-11:30am

W - 9:00am-11:30am

R - 9:00am-11:30am

Online Calculus II

Non-JHU students must be fully registered by June 1 in order to participate in the course. Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines. class runs from 6/12/2017- 8/4/2017

Course Number: AS.110.109.88

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Alexa Gaines

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

Linear Algebra

Vector spaces, matrices, and linear transformations. Solutions of systems of linear equations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and diagonalization of matrices. Applications to differential equations. * Prerequisites: Calculus I. Recommended: Calculus II.

Course Number: AS.110.201.11

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Nitu Kitchloo

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:00-11:30AM

T - 9:00-11:30AM

W - 9:00-11:30AM

R - 9:00-11:30AM

Online Linear Algebra

Non-JHU students must register by June 1 in order to participate in the course. Vector spaces, matrices, and linear transformations. Solutions of systems of linear equations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and diagonalization of matrices. Applications to differential equations. Class runs from: 6/12/2017- 8/4/2017 * Prerequisites: Calculus I, recommended Calculus II (Online)

Course Number: AS.110.201.88

Distribution: Q

Term: TBD

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Kalani Kansal

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

Calculus III

Calculus of functions of more than one variable: partial derivatives, and applications; multiple integrals, line and surface integrals; Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Gauss' Divergence Theorem. * Prerequisites: Calc II (110.107 or 110.109); or Honors One Variable Calculus (110.113)

Course Number: AS.110.202.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Giovanni DiMatteo

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1:00-3:30PM

T - 1:00-3:30PM

W - 1:00-3:30PM

R - 1:00-3:30PM

Online Calculus III

Non-JHU students must register by June 1 in order to participate in the course. Calculus of Several Variables. Calculus of functions of more than one variable: partial derivatives, and applications; multiple integrals, line and surface integrals; Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Gauss' Divergence Theorem. Class runs from 6/12/2017- 8/4/2017 * Prerequisites: Calc I and Calc II or Honors One Variable Calculus

Course Number: AS.110.202.88

Distribution: Q

Term: TBD

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Xudong Zheng

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

Differential Equations with Applications

This is an applied course in ordinary differential equations, which is primarily for students in the biological, physical and social sciences, and engineering. The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with the techniques of solving ordinary differential equations. The specific subjects to be covered include first order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, applications to electric circuits, oscillation of solutions, power series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, autonomous systems, Laplace transforms and linear differential equations, mathematical models (e.g., in the sciences or economics). * Prerequisites: Calculus II

Course Number: AS.110.302.11

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: Apruv Nakada

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1:00-3:30pm

T - 1:00-3:30PM

W - 1:00-3:30PM

R - 1:00-3:30PM

Online Differential Equations with Apps

Non-JHU students must register by June 1 in order to participate in the course. This is an applied course in ordinary differential equations, which is primarily for students in the biological, physical and social sciences, and engineering. Techniques for solving ordinary differential equations are studied. Topics covered include first order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, applications to electric circuits, oscillation of solutions, power series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, autonomous systems, Laplace transforms and linear differential equations, mathematical models (e.g., in the sciences or economics). * Prerequisites: Calculus II

Course Number: AS.110.302.88

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus:

Instructor: Caroline VanBlargan

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

Online Differential Equations with Apps

Non-JHU students must register by June 1 in order to participate in the course. This is an applied course in ordinary differential equations, which is primarily for students in the biological, physical and social sciences, and engineering. Techniques for solving ordinary differential equations are studied. Topics covered include first order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, applications to electric circuits, oscillation of solutions, power series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, autonomous systems, Laplace transforms and linear differential equations, mathematical models (e.g., in the sciences or economics). (6/6-7/29) * Prerequisites: Calculus II

Course Number: AS.110.302.88

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus:

Instructor: Dan Ginsberg & Nicholas Marshburn

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

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NEUROSCIENCE

An Introduction to Neuroscience

Our knowledge of brain function from the level of single molecules to human behavior continues to expand at something approaching light speed. That knowledge invades our lives every day. And decisions are made based on that knowledge from every corner of life…from physician to politician and every stop in between. This course is meant to provide a fundamental understanding of how the cells and molecules as well as the regions and systems of the brain work to have you see and hear and move and remember. The course is divided into four sections that progress from the cells of the brain and spinal cord to circuits then systems and finally behaviors. Introduction to Neuroscience is designed for any college student who has an interest in the range of disciplines we call neuroscience.

Course Number: AS.080.105.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Stewart Hendry

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-11:10am

T - 9:30-11:10am

W - 9:30-11:10am

R - 9:30-11:10am

F - 9:30-11:10am

Nervous System I*

The Nervous System is a fully integrated, two-semester course that surveys the cellular and molecular biology of neurons as well as the structure and function of the nervous system. Students must register for Nervous System II offered in the second term. Course open to JHU undergraduates only. * Prerequisites: AS 080.105 or AS 080.203 or AS 200.141 or Permission. Open to JHU Undergraduates only

Course Number: AS.080.305.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: Stewart Hendry

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1:00-2:45pm

T - 1:00-2:45pm

W - 1:00-2:45pm

R - 1:00-2:45pm

F - 1:00-2:45pm

Nervous System II*

The course uses the functional organization of the somatosensory system as a means to examine mechanisms of neutral development. Generation and maturation of neurons, guidance of axons, formation of synapses and the regressive events that shape the adult nervous system will be examined. At the same time we will explore the structure and function of brain regions that allow us to feel pain and temperature, detect vibration, recognize shape and perceive where we are in space. Finally, the single-neuron events that lead to adaptive changes in function will be explored in the context of central nervous system control of movement and of higher order functions of speech and memory. Students who do not register for Nervous System I offered during the first term should not register for this class. Course open to JHU undergraduates only. * Prerequisites: AS.080.305 and AS.080.203. Open to JHU Undergraduates only

Course Number: AS.080.306.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus:

Instructor: Stewart Hendry

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1:00-2:45pm

T - 1-2:45pm

W - 1-2:45pm

R - 1-2:45pm

F - 1-2:45pm

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PHILOSOPHY

Philosophy of Sport

This is course introduces students to philosophical methods by bringing them to bear on the topic of sports and games. We will explore questions about what it is for a certain practice to be a game or a sport (the metaphysics of sport) as well as questions about fair play, performance enhancement, gender equity, and commercialism and corruption in sports (the ethics of sports). * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.150.100.21

Distribution: H W

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Thomas Wilk

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 930-1145am

W - 930-1145am

F - 930-1145am

Philosophical Intuitions

At least according to a prevalent conception, analytic philosophers frequently appeal to intuitions - immediate opinions we come to have about cases or claims. In this course, we will discuss three questions that naturally arise: (1) How can we define intuitions and what underlies them? (2) Do philosophers really appeal to intuitions as frequently as many seem to think? (3) Which role should intuitions play in philosophy?

Course Number: AS.150.222.11

Distribution: H S

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Tammo Lossau

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 930-1145am

W - 930-1145am

F - 930-1145am

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PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY

General Physics: Physical Science Major I*

This two-session sequence in general physics is identical will cover mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. Rather than being presented via lectures and discussion sections, it is instead taught in an "active learning" style with most class time given to small group problem-solving guided by instructors. The first term covers mechanics and thermodynamics. The second term addresses electricity and magnetism, optics, and selected topics in modern physics. Students are required to have received credit for Calculus I or be enrolled concurrently with this course. Note: General Physics lab is not required as a co-requisite but is strongly recommended * Prerequisites: 110.106 or 110.108

Course Number: AS.171.101.11

Distribution: N E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jonathan Mumford

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 930am-12pm

T - 930am-12pm

W - 930am-12pm

R - 930am-12pm

General Physics: Physical Science Major II*

This two-session sequence in general physics will cover mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics, but differs in instructional format. Rather than being presented via lectures and discussion sections, it is instead taught in an "active learning" style with most class time given to small group problem-solving guided by instructors.The first term covers mechanics and thermodynamics. The second term addresses electricity and magnetism, optics, and selected topics in modern physics. Students are required to have received credit for Calculus II or be enrolled concurrently with this course. Note: General Physics lab is not required as a co-requisite but is strongly recommended. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: 110.107 or 110.109

Course Number: AS.171.102.21

Distribution: N E

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Steven Wonnell

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 930a-12pm

T - 930a-12pm

W - 930a-12pm

R - 930a-12pm

F - 930a-12pm

Subatomic World

Introduction to the concepts of physics of the subatomic world: symmetries, relativity, quanta, neutrinos, particles and fields. The course traces the history of our description of the physical world from the Greeks through Faraday and Maxwell to quantum mechanics in the early 20th century and on through nuclear physics and particle physics. The emphasis is on the ideas of modern physics, not on the mathematics. Intended for non-science majors.

Course Number: AS.171.113.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Barry Blumenfeld

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:15PM

W - 1-3:15PM

F - 1-3:15PM

Stars & the Universe: Cosmic Evolution

This course looks at the evolution of the universe from its origin in a cosmic explosion to emergence of life on Earth and possibly other planets throughout the universe. Topics include big-bang cosmology; origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, planets, life, and intelligence; black holes; quasars; and relativity theory. The material is largely descriptive, based on insights from physics, astronomy, geology, chemistry, biology, and anthropology. Course website: http://henry.pha.jhu.edu/stars.html. * Prerequisites: High school algebra, geometry, trigonometry

Course Number: AS.171.118.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Wei Zheng

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9:00am-11:30am

W - 9:00am-11:30am

R - 9:00am-11:30am

General Physics Laboratory I*

Experiments performed in the lab provide further illustration of the principles discussed in General Physics. While this lab course lab is not required as a co-requisite of the corresponding General Physics lecture course it is strongly recommended. Note: First and second terms must be taken in sequence.

Course Number: AS.173.111.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus:

Instructor: Jonathan Mumford

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-4pm

T - 1-4pm

W - 1-4pm

R - 1-4pm

General Physics Laboratory II*

Experiments performed in the lab provide further illustration of the principles discussed in General Physics. Students are required to take this course concurrently with General Physics unless they already have received credit for the lab. Note: First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: Co-requisite 171.102

Course Number: AS.173.112.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jonathan Mumford

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-4pm

T - 1-4pm

W - 1-4pm

R - 1-4pm

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

Love in Politics, Politics in Love

In much of political science, political power is assumed to flow from fear. Using classic texts in political theory, this class will consider the existence of a different kind of political power, one flowing from love. The following questions will structure the course: What are the powers and forms of love? Are political bonds and loving bonds related? Class discussions will draw from a variety of sources, including readings by Hobbes, Nygren, Plato, Augustine, Rousseau, Engels, Jordan, and Berlant. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS 191.201.21

Distribution: H S W

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Meghan Helsel

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1030-12pm

T - 1030-12pm

W - 1030-12pm

R - 1030-12pm

F - 1030-12pm

Politics of East Asia

This course will examine some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia. We will analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics in the context of East Asia: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. Topics will include state-society relations, “late” development, nationalism, and US-East Asia relations.

Course Number: AS.190.109.11

Distribution: S

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Erin Chung

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 3:00-5:30PM

W - 3:00-5:30PM

F - 3:00-5:30PM

American Political Thought

This course offers an introduction to American Political Thought. We will explore the various accounts of liberalism, democracy, race, gender, pluralism, and the rule of law that have shaped and continue to influence American politics. Students will read texts by Paine, Jefferson, Madison, Tocqueville, Douglass, DuBois, Emerson, Thoreau, Stanton, Dewey, Friedman, King, Jr., and Malcolm X. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.191.202.21

Distribution: H S

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Patrick Giamario

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 3:00-5:15PM

W - 3:00-5:15PM

R - 3:00-5:15PM

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PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

Principles of Marketing

This course explores the role of marketing in society and within the organization. It examines the process of developing, pricing, promoting and distributing products to consumer and business markets and shows how marketing managers use the elements of the marketing mix to gain a competitive advantage. Through interactive, application-oriented exercises, case videotapes, a guest speaker (local marketer), and a group project, students will have ample opportunity to observe key marketing concepts in action. The group project requires each team to research the marketing plan for an existing product of its choice. Teams will analyze what is currently being done by the organization, choose one of the strategic growth alternatives studied, and recommend why this alternative should be adopted. The recommendations will include how the current marketing plan will need to be modified in order to implement this strategy.

Course Number: EN.660.250.21

Distribution:

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Leslie Kendrick

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

T - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Professional Writing & Communication

This course teaches students to communicate effectively with a wide variety of specialized and non-specialized audiences. Projects include production of resumes, cover letters, proposals, instructions, reports, and other relevant documents. Class emphasizes writing clearly and persuasively, creating appropriate visuals, developing oral presentation skills, working in collaborative groups, giving and receiving feedback, and simulating the real world environment in which most communication occurs. No audits. Online course running 6/12/2017- 8/4/2017

Course Number: EN.661.110.88

Distribution: W

Term: Term I

Dates: May 30 - June 30

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Robert Graham

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

Culture of the Engineering Profession*

This course focuses on building understanding of the culture of engineering while preparing students to communicate effectively with the various audiences with whom engineers interact. Working from a base of contemporary science writing (monographs, non-fiction, popular literature and fiction), students will engage in discussion, argument, case study and project work to investigate: the engineering culture and challenges to that culture, the impacts of engineering solutions on society, the ethical guidelines for the profession, and the ways engineering information is conveyed to the range of audiences for whom the information is critical. Additionally, students will master many of the techniques critical to successful communication within the engineering culture through a series of short papers and presentations associated with analysis of the writings and cases. No audits. WSE sophomores, juniors, and seniors or by instructor approval Online course running 6/12/2017- 8/4/2017

Course Number: EN.661.315.88

Distribution: S W

Term: Term II

Dates: July 3 - August 4

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Robert Graham

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

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PSYCHOLOGICAL & BRAIN SCIENCES

Childhood Disorders/Treatments: Online

This is an online course. The class will meet for ten weeks from May 30 through August 4 and will follow the deadlines for Term I for add/drop/withdraw and grade changes. This course examines the psychological disorders that are usually first diagnosed prior to adulthood. Some of the specific disorders that will be discussed are Emotional and Behavior Disorders, Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Learning Disorders and Intellectual Disability. Students will become familiar with various diagnoses, etiologies, and methods of treatment.

Course Number: AS.200.162.87

Distribution: S

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Ann Jarema

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Discover Hopkins: The Psychology of Police Deadly Force Encounters

A forensic psychologist and SWAT team leader evaluate split second decisions employed by police who use deadly force. Police shootings, and the media report of police use of deadly force against black males, has contributed to a further deterioration of police community relationships. Relying on case studies, we will focus on how police officer decisions concerning deadly force are made, what cause bad decisions, and whether specific training can improve decision making.

Course Number: AS.200.210.41

Distribution: S

Term: Discover Hopkins I

Dates: June 26 - July 7

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lawrence Raifman & John Jacobs

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 930am - 430pm

T - 930am - 430pm

W - 930am - 430pm

R - 930am - 430pm

F - 930am - 430pm

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Dr. Marek Cieplak is involved in experimental and theoretical studies of proteins.

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