Skip to Main Content





Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

male student
student dancers

Courses

View By:
Department

Dist.

Term

 

Day


Campus

Time

 

Distribution (Dist.) Abbreviations
E: Engineering Science, N: Natural Science, Q: Quantitative Studies, H: Humanistic Studies, S: Social & Behavioral Studies, W: Writing Intensive

 

* Courses with an asterisk following the title are not open to Pre-College students.

 

Summer 2016 courses listed below:

APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS

Mathematics of Music

This course aims to promote students’ understanding of some important mathematical concepts by focusing on music and the sounds made by musical instruments as an area of mathematical application. Students will be exposed to basic concepts in mathematics including Fourier series, linear algebra, fundamental ideas from signal processing, and stochastic process models. The structure, organization, and synthesis of sounds and combinations of sounds will be explored. * Prerequisites: High School Mathematics (Calculus not needed)

Course Number: EN.550.105.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Daniel Naiman

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 10:30AM-12:40PM

T - 10:30AM-12:40PM

W - 10:30AM-12:40PM

R - 10:30AM-12:40PM

Statistical Analysis I*

First semester of a general survey of statistical methodology. Topics include descriptive statistics, introductory probability, conditional probability, random variables, expectation, sampling, the central limit theorem, classical and robust estimation, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. Case studies from psychology, epidemiology, economics and other fields serve to illustrate the underlying theory. Some use of Minitab, Excel or R, but no prior computing experience is necessary. Recommended Course Background: four years of high school mathematics. Students who may wish to undertake more than two semesters of probability and statistics should consider EN.550.420-EN.550.430. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics

Course Number: EN.550.111.11

Distribution: Q E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Kamel Lahouel

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 3-5:30PM

T - 3-5:30PM

W - 3-5:30PM

R - 3-5:30PM

Statistical Analysis II*

Second semester of a general survey of statistical methodology. Topics include least squares, regression and analysis of variance, correlation, nonparametric methods, analysis of categorical data, contingency tables and chi-square tests, the likelihood concept, and Bayesian inference. * Prerequisites: EN.550.111 or EN.550.113 or AS.230.205 or AS.280.345 or credit for AP Statistics * Prerequisites: EN.550.111 or EN.550.113 or AS.230.205 or AS.280.345 or credit for AP Statistics

Course Number: EN.550.112.21

Distribution: Q E

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Andrew Hawkins

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

T - 9-11:30AM

W - 9-11:30AM

R - 9-11:30AM

Discrete Mathematics

Introduction to the mathematics of finite systems. Logic; Boolean algebra; induction and recursion; sets, functions, relations, equivalence, and partially ordered sets; elementary combinatorics; modular arithmetic and the Euclidean algorithm; group theory; permutations and symmetry groups; graph theory. Selected applications. The concept of a proof and development of the ability to recognize and construct proofs are part of the course. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics. * Prerequisites: 4 years of high school mathematics

Course Number: EN.550.171.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Fred Torcaso

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

T - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Introduction to Biostatistics

A self-contained course covering various data analysis methods used in the life sciences. Topics include types of experimental data, numerical and graphical descriptive statistics, concepts of (and distinctions between) population and sample, basic probability, fitting curves to experimental data (regression analysis), comparing groups in populations (analysis of variance), methods of modeling probability (contingency tables and logistic regression). * Prerequisites: Three years of high school mathematics. * Prerequisites: 3 years of high school mathematics

Course Number: EN.550.230.21

Distribution: Q E

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Prashant Athavale

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

T - 9-11:30AM

W - 9-11:30AM

R - 9-11:30AM

Probability and Statistics*

An introduction to probability and statistics at the calculus level, intended for engineering and science students planning to take only one course on the topics. Combinatorial probability, independence, conditional probability, random variables, expectation and moments, limit theory, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, tests of means and variances, goodness-of-fit. Recommended co-requisite: multivariable calculus. Students cannot receive credit for both 550.310 and 550.311. Students cannot receive credit for 550.310 after having received credit for 550.420 or 550.430. * Prerequisites: Calculus I and II * Prerequisites: Calculus I and Calculus II

Course Number: EN.550.310.11

Distribution: Q E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Heather Patsolic

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

T - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

BACK TO TOP


ART

Landscape Photography

Class begins: Wednesday, July 6th. In this course students will experience the drama and beauty of the urban and rural landscape. On numerous field trips they will hone their camera technique as well as learn elements of composition and develop a personal style. Students will learn the fundamentals of Photoshop and they will also be introduced to the beauty of black and white in Silver Efex software. Digital SLR cameras will be provided.

Course Number: AS.371.166.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Phyllis Berger

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9:20-12:30PM

W - 9:20-12:30PM

R - 9:20-12:30PM

Documentary Photography

Course will begin on Wednesday, July 6th. In this hands-on course, we will explore different genres of documentary photography, including the fine art document, photojournalism, social documentary photography, the photo essay and photography of propaganda. Students will work on a semester-long photo-documentary project on a subject of their choice. Digital SLRs will be provided. First class is mandatory.

Course Number: AS.371.303.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Phyllis Berger

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 2-5PM

W - 2-5PM

R - 2-5PM

BACK TO TOP


BIOLOGY

Introduction to Laboratory Research

This is an exciting time to work in biotechnology research. The Human Genome Project is generating fundamental genetic information at a breathtaking rate. Basic research findings are being applied to medicine, agriculture, and the environment; and a variety of new biotechnology products are moving into production. Behind each of these accomplishments lies extensive laboratory research. In this class, students will explore a variety of experimental techniques and evaluate their roles in modern biotechnology research.

Course Number: AS.020.120.77

Distribution: N

Term: Non-Homewood 2-week, Term 2

Dates: July 5 - July 15

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Instructor: Josh Olszewicz

Credits: 2

Days & Times:

M - 10-1PM

T - 10-1PM

W - 10-1PM

R - 10-1PM

F - 10-1PM

Techniques in Molecular Biology

This course is designed to supplement the scientific classroom experience of students by providing hands on experience with the essential core molecular biology techniques of bacterial DNA cloning, DNA analysis, and protein analysis. Students will be able to understand and explain how these methodologies work scientifically and will develop the basic laboratory skills necessary for the successful completion of the assays. * Prerequisites: Solid background in biology

Course Number: AS.020.126.71

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term I

Dates: June 20 - July 1

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: James Gordy

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 3:30-5:30PM

T - 3:30-5:30PM

W - 3:30-5:30PM

R - 3:30-5:30PM

F - 3:30-5:30PM

Phage Research

Have you ever discovered a novel form of life? Care to contribute to an ongoing research program and start establishing your scientific legacy? Students will isolate and characterize novel bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) from the environment using modern molecular biological techniques. Includes training in lab safety, and sterile technique. This course is open to JHU and visiting undergraduates as well as rising seniors and rising undergraduate freshmen only. The charge for this lab course is $2000.00.

Course Number: AS.020.137.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Joel Schildbach

Credits: 2

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-12PM

T - 9:30-12PM

W - 9:30-12PM

R - 9:30-12PM

F - 9:30-12PM

High-throughput Sequencing in Biology

This course will introduce students to high-throughput sequencing and its impact on biological research. At the end of the course students should be familiar with the various HTS techniques and how to use them for a project of their interest. They will also gain a clear understanding of the work flow involved and be familiar with commonly used bioinformatic tools.. The course will include both class room instruction and lab work (both wet lab and computer lab). The topics that will be covered include: High-throughput sequencing(HTS) technology - An introduction to the various technologies available, how they work, and the pros and cons for each of the current HTS technologies; A look at some of the most interesting/informative assays developed using HTS technology; Basics of command-line(unix) and the use of bioinformatic tools to analyze HTS data sets; An introduction to some well-established bioinformatic pipelines and; Critical evaluation and validation of results from HTS.

Course Number: AS.020.174.73

Distribution: N

Term: Mini-Term III

Dates: July 18 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Vidya Balagopal

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 3:30-5:30PM

T - 3:30-5:30PM

W - 3:30-5:30PM

R - 3:30-5:30PM

F - 3:30-5:30PM

Introduction to Biological Molecules

This course presents an overview to biochemistry and molecular biology, especially focusing on biotechnology and medicine. Students will have classroom and laboratory experience and group presentations. Prerequisite: High school level Chemistry and Biology (both with a grade of A). * Prerequisites: High School Biology and Chemistry (Both with a grade of A ).

Course Number: AS.020.205.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Richard Shingles

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

T - 9AM-12:00PM

W - 9-11:30AM

F - 9-11:30AM

Introduction to Biological Molecules

This course presents an overview to biochemistry and molecular biology, especially focusing on biotechnology and medicine. Students will have classroom and laboratory experience and group presentations. Prerequisite: High school level Chemistry and Biology (both with a grade of A). * Prerequisites: High School Biology and Chemistry (Both with a grade of A ).

Course Number: AS.020.205.22

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Richard Shingles

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

F - 1-3:30PM

Biochemistry*

The molecules responsible for the life processes of animals, plants and microbes will be examined. The structures, biosynthesis, degradation and interconversion of the major cellular constituents including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids will illustrate the similarity of the biomolecules and metabolic processes involved in diverse forms of life. * Prerequisites: AS.020.205-206 Introductory Organic Chemistry I & II, or AS.020.212 Honors Organic Chemistry.

Course Number: AS.020.305.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Robert Horner

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:15AM

T - 9-11:15AM

W - 9-11:15AM

R - 9-11:15AM

F - 9-11:15AM

Anatomy & Physiology*

An introduction to the human gross anatomy. It will seek to give students enough background in anatomical knowledge and vocabulary to help them in their initial training in medical school; however, it will not be a substitute for anatomy courses in medical school. It will focus on normal adult anatomy, and it will cover each of the main regions of the body - i.e., thorax, abdomen and pelvis, back and limbs, and head and neck. Lectures will cover descriptive and functional anatomy, ultimately leaving students with a better understanding of anatomical terminology and 3D relationships of structures within the human body, and better problem-solving skills as they begin to relate symptoms to causes, again at the gross anatomical level. * Prerequisites: AS.020.151-152, Juniors and Seniors Only

Course Number: AS.020.375.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Dorhyun Johng & Josh Croteau

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

W - 9-11:30AM

F - 9-11:30AM

BACK TO TOP


BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

Intellectual Property Primer for Scientists and Engineers: Patents, Copyrights and Trademarks

The course will outline the basics of protection of IP for scientists and engineers. Most of the course will cover the basics of patent law, but introductions will also be given to trademarks and copyrights. Specific problems in the areas of biotechnology, computer science and the Internet will also be highlighted. It is hoped that the attendees will obtain a basic understanding of how intellectual property is protected. No prior legal background is required.

Course Number: EN.580.105.72

Distribution: S

Term: Mini-Term II

Dates: July 5 - July 15

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Joerg-Uwe Szipl

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 6-8PM

T - 6-8PM

W - 6-8PM

R - 6-8PM

F - 6-8PM

BACK TO TOP


BIOPHYSICS

Introduction to Computing

Course introduces students to the use of computers for applications in many areas (natural and social sciences, humanities, and engineering). Students will obtain basic computing skills and tools, including familiarity with UNIX, with the use of complex UNIX commands (e.g grep, awk, sed) and shell scripts, with the Python programming language, with graphing software and with a package for numerical and statistical computing, such as Mathematica or Matlab. Brief lectures with extensive hands-on computer laboratories with examples from many disciplines.

Course Number: AS.250.205.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Carolyn Fitch

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9–11:15AM

W - 9–11:15AM

F - 9–11:15AM

Protein Biochemistry and Engineering Laboratory

An entry-level project laboratory where students will use the techniques of protein engineering to attempt to modify existing proteins to endow them with new structural or physical properties. This course will provide an introduction to standard biochemistry laboratory practice and to protein science, including experiments in site-directed mutagenesis, protein purification and characterization of structure and stability. * Prerequisites: NONE

Course Number: AS.250.253.11

Distribution: N W

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Bertrand Garcia-Moreno

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1–5:30PM

W - 1–5:30PM

F - 1–5:30PM

BACK TO TOP


CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING

Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Lab

This course challenges students with laboratory projects that are not well-defined. Students work in groups to develop an effective approach to experiments. They identify the important operating variables, decide how best to obtain them using measured or calculated values. Based on their results they predict, carryout, analyze and improve experiments. Each student analyzes at least two of the following biomolecular projects: bioreactor, biocatalysis and membrane separation and one of the projects in EN.540.311. In addition to technical objectives, this course stresses oral and written communication. Students will have additional meeting times with the instructors and some writing professors outside of class.

Course Number: EN.540.313.11

Distribution: E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lise Dahuron & Julie Reiser

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 6

Days & Times:

T - 1-6PM

F - 1-6PM

BACK TO TOP


CHEMISTRY

Introductory Chemistry I

The fundamental principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, elementary thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, kinetics, and transition metal chemistry are introduced in this course. To be taken with Introductory Chemistry Laboratory unless lab has been previously completed. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. High school physics and calculus are strongly recommended as prerequisites. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. Pre-College enrollment requires instructor permission. * Prerequisites: Pre-College requires instructor permission.

Course Number: AS.030.101.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Sunita Thyagarajan

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9-11AM

T - 9-11AM

R - 9-11AM

F - 9-11AM

Introductory Chemistry II*

The fundamental principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, elementary thermodynamics, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, kinetics, and transition metal chemistry are introduced in this course. To be taken with Introductory Chemistry Laboratory unless lab has been previously completed. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. High school physics and calculus are strongly recommended as prerequisites. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: AS 030.101 or equivalent

Course Number: AS.030.102.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jane Greco

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9-11AM

T - 9-11AM

R - 9-11AM

F - 9-11AM

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I

Laboratory work includes some quantitative analysis and the measurement of physical properties. Open only to those who are registered for or have successfully completed Introductory Chemistry 030.101. * Prerequisites: Pre-College requires instructor permission, 030.101 co-requisite or prerequisite

Course Number: AS.030.105.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Louise Pasternack

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-4PM

T - 1-4PM

R - 1-4PM

F - 1-4PM

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II*

Laboratory work includes some quantitative analysis and the measurement of physical properties. Open only to those who are concurrently registered for or have completed Introductory Chemistry Lecture II. Recommended Course Background: AS.030.105 or equivalent. * Prerequisites: AS 030.105 or equivalent

Course Number: AS.030.106.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Louise Pasternack

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-4PM

T - 1-4PM

R - 1-4PM

F - 1-4PM

Introductory Organic Chemistry I*

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics include interrelationships of structure, physical properties, synthesis, and reactions and their mechanisms as well as a brief overview of bio-organic chemistry. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: Introductory Chemistry or the equivalent. * Prerequisites: Prerequisite: Introductory Chemistry or the equivalent.

Course Number: AS.030.205.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Christopher Falzone

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

T - 9-11:30AM

W - 9-11:30AM

R - 9-11:30AM

F - 9-11:30AM

Introductory Organic Chemistry II*

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics include interrelationships of structure, physical properties, synthesis, and reactions and their mechanisms as well as a brief overview of bio-organic chemistry. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: Introductory Chemistry or the equivalent.

Course Number: AS.030.206.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Eric Hill

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

T - 9-11:30AM

W - 9-11:30AM

R - 9-11:30AM

F - 9-11:30AM

Problem Solving Methodology in Organic Chemistry I*

This course will focus on the skills and strategies often utilized for solving problems in organic chemistry. In a seminar-style format, we will focus on a variety of strategies and techniques that students are otherwise expected to discover independently. This optional course is designed to help students succeed in Organic Chemistry I. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis, and is designed to be fun (believe it or not). Students work together in groups to solve challenging problems, focusing on the strategies necessary to solve each problem. This course is not required in order to succeed in Organic Chemistry I, but students in the past have found it to be helpful in guiding their study efforts for Organic Chemistry I. * Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to students registered in current Organic Chemistry term.

Course Number: AS.030.207.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Christopher Falzone

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 2

Days & Times:

T - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Problem Solving Methodology in Organic Chemistry II*

This course will focus on the skills and strategies often utilized for solving problems in organic chemistry. In a seminar-style format, we will focus on a variety of strategies and techniques that students are otherwise expected to discover independently. This optional course is designed to help students succeed in Organic Chemistry II. The course is graded on a pass/fail basis, and is designed to be fun (believe it or not). Students work together in groups to solve challenging problems, focusing on the strategies necessary to solve each problem. This course is not required in order to succeed in Organic Chemistry II, but students in the past have found it to be helpful in guiding their study efforts for Organic Chemistry II. * Prerequisites: Enrollment restricted to students registered in current Organic Chemistry term.

Course Number: AS.030.208.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Eric Hill

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 2

Days & Times:

T - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory*

Laboratory work includes fundamental laboratory techniques and preparation of representative organic compounds. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Organic Chemistry. Note: This one-semester course is offered each term. Introductory Organic Chemistry I/II requires one semester of the laboratory.

Course Number: AS.030.225.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Thomas Lectka

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 12:30-4PM

T - 12:30-4PM

W - 12:30-4PM

R - 12:30-4PM

F - 12:30-4PM

Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory*

Laboratory work includes fundamental laboratory techniques and preparation of representative organic compounds. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Organic Chemistry. Note: This one-semester course is offered each term. Introductory Organic Chemistry I/II requires one semester of the laboratory.

Course Number: AS.030.225.12

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Thomas Lectka

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 4-7:30PM

T - 4-7:30PM

W - 4-7:30PM

R - 4-7:30PM

F - 4-7:30PM

Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory*

Laboratory work includes fundamental laboratory techniques and preparation of representative organic compounds. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Organic Chemistry. Note: This one-semester course is offered each term. Introductory Organic Chemistry I/II requires one semester of the laboratory.

Course Number: AS.030.225.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Thomas Lectka

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 12:30-4PM

T - 12:30-4PM

W - 12:30-4PM

R - 12:30-4PM

F - 12:30-4PM

BACK TO TOP


COMPUTER SCIENCE

Introduction to Programming in Java

This course introduces fundamental structured and object-oriented programming concepts and techniques, using Java, and is intended for all who plan to use computer programming in their studies and careers. Topics covered include variables, arithmetic operators, control structures, arrays, functions, recursion, dynamic memory allocation, files, class usage and class writing. Program design and testing are also covered, in addition to more advanced object-oriented concepts including inheritance and exceptions as time permits. Summer only: Course homework involves significant programming (15-20 hours/wk). Attendance and participation is expected. * Prerequisites: Familiarity with using computers.

Course Number: EN.600.107.21

Distribution: E

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Joanne Selinski

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:30AM-12PM

T - 9:30AM-12PM

R - 9:30AM-12PM

F - 9:30AM-12PM

Intermediate Programming

This course teaches intermediate to advanced programming, using C and C++. (Prior knowledge of these languages is not expected.) We will cover low-level programming techniques, as well as object-oriented class design, and the use of class libraries. Specific topics include pointers, dynamic memory allocation, polymorphism, overloading, inheritance, templates, collections, exceptions, and others as time permits. Students are expected to learn syntax and some language specific features independently. Course work involves significant programming projects in both languages. * Prerequisites: 600.107 or 600.112 or AP Computer Science.

Course Number: EN.600.120.11

Distribution: E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Yotam Barnoy

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-12PM

T - 9:30-12PM

R - 9:30-12PM

F - 9:30-12PM

Data Structures

This course covers the design and implementation of data structures including arrays, stacks, queues, linked lists, binary trees, heaps, balanced trees (e.g. 2-3 trees, AVL-trees) and graphs. Other topics include sorting, hashing, memory allocation, and garbage collection. Course work involves both written homework and Java programming assignments. * Prerequisites: 600.107: Intro to Programming, AP CS or equivalent; Discrete Math recommended

Course Number: EN.600.226.21

Distribution: Q E

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Anwar Mamat

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 3-5:30PM

T - 3-5:30PM

R - 3-5:30PM

F - 3-5:30PM

Computer Systems Fundamentals*

We study the design and performance of a variety of computer systems from simple 8-bit micro-controllers through 32/64-bit RISC architectures all the way to ubiquitous x86 CISC architecture. We'll start from logic gates and digital circuits before delving into arithmetic and logic units, registers, caches, memory, stacks and procedure calls, pipelined execution, super-scalar architectures, memory management units, etc. Along the way we'll study several typical instruction set architectures and review concepts such as interrupts, hardware and software exceptions, serial and other peripheral communications protocols, etc. A number of programming projects, frequently done in assembly language and using various processor simulators, round out the course. * Prerequisites: EN.600.120 Intermediate Programming

Course Number: EN.600.233.11

Distribution: E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Peter Froehlich

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 10-12:30PM

W - 10-12:30PM

F - 10-12:30PM

BACK TO TOP


ECONOMICS

Elements of Macroeconomics

This course introduces the basic tools of macroeconomics and teaches how they are applied to real world economic policy. Throughout the course, the main goals will be to a) study economic aggregates such as the overall price level; the unemployment rate and the GDP b)understand how they relate to each other. Attention will be given to fiscal and monetary policies. We will also analyze the recent financial crisis and its impact on the economic activity.

Course Number: AS.180.101.21

Distribution: S

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Osama Khan

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

W - 9-11:30AM

R - 9-11:30AM

Elements of Microeconomics

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems. * Prerequisites: Basic algebra and ability to read and draw graphs.

Course Number: AS.180.102.11

Distribution: S

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus:

Instructor: Jianhui Li

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

T - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Elements of Microeconomics

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.  * Prerequisites: Student should be comfortable with basic algebra & graphs

Course Number: AS.180.102.21

Distribution: S

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus:

Instructor: Mikhail Smirnov

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

International Trade*

This course presents international trade theory and applies it to policy analysis and empirical studies. The theory covers both the classical theory of comparative advantage as well as recent advances of new trade theory. A broad range of real-world topics, including trade flows, factor mobility, trade policy and institutions will be discussed. * Prerequisites: Elements of Microeconomics (180.102)

Course Number: AS.180.241.11

Distribution: S

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jong Jae Lee

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 4-6:30PM

W - 4-6:30PM

R - 4-6:30PM

International Monetary Economics

This course presents International Monetary Economics theory and applies it towards gaining an understanding of recent events and current policy issues. The theory presented in this course covers a broad range of topics including exchange rate determination, monetary and fiscal policy in an open economy, balance of payments crises, the choice of exchange rate systems, and international debt. The insights provided by these theoretical frameworks will enable us to discuss topics such as the current global financial crisis, global financial imbalances, the Chinese exchange rate regime, and proposed changes in the international financial architecture.

Course Number: AS.180.242.21

Distribution: S

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Yeabin Moon

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 10-12:15PM

T - 10-12:15PM

R - 10-12:15PM

BACK TO TOP


ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING

Circuits*

An introductory course on electric circuit analysis. Topics include time domain and frequency domain analysis techniques, transient and steady-state response, and operational amplifiers. * Prerequisites: 110.108 and 110.109.

Course Number: EN.520.213.11

Distribution: E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Howard Weinert

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:45AM

T - 9-11:45AM

W - 9-11:45AM

R - 9-11:45AM

BACK TO TOP


ENGLISH

James Joyce's Ulysses

Ulysses is often described as impossible to read (it isn't) and as the greatest novel in the English language (it just might be). A monumental book set in a single day, Ulysses seems to have it all: a panoply of literary styles, religions, philosophies, histories, emotions, and even a wide variety of bodily functions. In addition to offering an up-close look at the novel itself, this course examines the novel's use of mythology, meditations on Irishness, reflections on capitalism, and its place in "modernism." By the end of the course, not only will you have read the famously difficult and important Ulysses; you will have understood it, too.

Course Number: AS.060.159.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Robert Day

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:45AM

W - 9-11:45AM

F - 9-11:45AM

The Marriage Plot: From Jane Austen to Bridesmaids

No device has been more essential to the modern novel than that of marriage. In this course we will examine the history of the marriage plot in literature and film, beginning with Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and concluding with the 2011 film Bridesmaids. We will have occasion to inquire into the significance of marriage to the form of the novel as well as the ways in which the marriage plot has been appropriated, adapted, and deconstructed in nineteenth-century novels and contemporary novels alike. This class will also include a digital component as we will all collaborate to create a growing database of tropes common to marriage plots.

Course Number: AS.060.164.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Grant Shreve

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

F - 1-3:30PM

BACK TO TOP


ENTREPRENEURSHIP & MANAGEMENT

The Hopkins Leadership Challenge Seminar

The Hopkins Leadership Challenge seminar is designed specifically for students enrolled in Hop-in program. The classroom content will include discussions with current university leaders and will serve as an introduction to the history, services and involvement opportunities open to JHU undergraduates. The seminars will include discussion and assignments from The Leadership Challenge by Kouzes and Posner. The experiential component of the course will include programs designed to enhance classroom content and expose students to the on campus and off campus involvement opportunities available. Enrollment limited to Hop-In program students only.

Course Number: EN.660.100.72

Distribution: S

Term: Mini-Term II

Dates: July 5 - July 15

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Justin Beauchamp & Tiffany Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

T - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

F - 1-3:30PM

Introduction to Business

This course is designed as an introduction to the terms, concepts, and values of business and management. The course comprises three broad categories: the economic, financial, and corporate context of business activities; the organization and management of business enterprises; and, the marketing and production of goods and services. Topic specific readings, short case studies and financial exercises all focus on the bases for managerial decisions as well as the long and short-term implications of those decisions in a global environment. No audits.

Course Number: EN.660.105.21

Distribution: S W

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lawrence Aronhime

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:45AM

T - 9-11:45AM

W - 9-11:45AM

R - 9-11:45AM

Financial Accounting

This course will meet for the first time on Tuesday, May 31st. The course in Financial Accounting is designed for anyone who could be called upon to analyze and/or communicate financial results and/or make effective financial decisions in a for-profit business setting. No prior accounting knowledge or skill is required for successful completion of this course. Because accounting is described as the language of business, this course emphasizes the vocabulary, methods, and processes by which all business transactions are communicated. The accounting cycle, basic business transactions, internal controls, and preparation and understanding of financial statements including balance sheets, statements of income and cash flows are covered. No audits.

Course Number: EN.660.203.11

Distribution:

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lawrence Aronhime

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:45AM

T - 9-11:45AM

W - 9-11:45AM

R - 9-11:45AM

BACK TO TOP


FILM & MEDIA STUDIES

Storytelling for Film and Fiction

Through the analysis of narrative films, short fiction, myths, fairy tales, and ghost stories, and through the workshopping of their own creative writing, students will explore the art and science of a good story well told. This course is an essential primer for upper-level screenwriting.

Course Number: AS.061.148.11

Distribution: H W

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Lucy Bucknell

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 5-7:30PM

W - 5-7:30PM

R - 5-7:30PM

Introduction to Short Filmmaking

In this introductory course, students will create short films using digital camera equipment, sound recording devices and the film editing software program, PremierePro. We will watch a variety of films in class; hold readings and discussions based on assigned text, take technical workshops on sound, lighting and hold a short workshop on 16mm film. We will study the history of filmmaking, with a strong focus on the avant-garde and experimental genres. We will also learn about current movements and trends that have developed throughout the world and have the opportunity to to meet with Baltimore filmmakers in class. Students will finish the course with a greater understanding of the lineage of cinema and will have learned a range of techniques to create, experiment and develop their own language of visual storytelling. We will discuss, engage, explore and most of all have fun! No prior experience with film or video required. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.061.161.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Margaret Rorison

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

T - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Analyzing Popular Culture

This course provides an introduction to the critical analysis of popular culture through the major theoretical paradigms of media and cultural theory. The teaching method uses a combination of media studies and sociology to explore popular culture and is designed to encourage students to become more active critics. The course presents a range of media from contemporary popular music to film and television. Smaller subjects include the teen "pop" love song, the politics of representation, and the forming of subcultures. * Prerequisites: N/A

Course Number: AS.061.222.11

Distribution: H W

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Meredith Ward

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

BACK TO TOP


GERMAN AND ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Online Spanish Elements I

Development of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and a midterm and final exam. In order to receive credit for Spanish 111 (if you are a JHU undergraduate), Spanish 112 must also be completed with a passing grade. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Course Number: AS.210.111.11

Distribution:

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Michelle Tracy

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Spanish Elements I

Development of the four basic language skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and a midterm and final exam. In order to receive credit for Spanish 111 (if you are a JHU undergraduate), Spanish 112 must also be completed with a passing grade. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Course Number: AS.210.111.21

Distribution:

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Michelle Tracy

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Spanish Elements II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and two hourly exams (no midterm and no final). Two textbooks are needed for the course, plus an access code to enter MySpanishLab from Pearson publishers. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.112.11

Distribution:

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Michelle Tracy

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Spanish Elements II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and two hourly exams (no midterm and no final). Two textbooks are needed for the course, plus an access code to enter MySpanishLab from Pearson publishers. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.112.21

Distribution:

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Michelle Tracy

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Intermediate Spanish I

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.211.11

Distribution: H

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Intermediate Spanish I

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.211.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Intermediate Spanish II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.212.11

Distribution: H

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Intermediate Spanish II

Continues building on the four essential skills for communication presented in Spanish Elements courses. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: Prerequisites: 210.112 or appropriate Placement Exam (S-Cape) score.

Course Number: AS.210.212.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Advanced Spanish I

Advanced Spanish I is designed to improve the four skills: Reading, writing, listening and speaking, essential for communication. This third-year course aims to improve the students' reading and writing skills by focusing on various types of texts. Students will also engage in more formal levels of written communication. This course also focuses on refinement of grammar. Students are exposed to a deeper understanding of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Extensive use of an online component delivered via Blackboard, sustained class participation, and three hourly exams (no midterm and no final). May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: 210.212 or appropriate S-Cape score

Course Number: AS.210.311.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Advanced Spanish II

This third-year course aims at improving the students' oral skills by focusing on the use of standard, spoken Spanish with an emphasis on colloquial and idiomatic expressions. Students will also engage in more formal levels of communication by discussing assigned literary and non-literary topics. They will increase their listening skills through movies and other listening comprehension exercises. The course will also focus on vocabulary acquisition. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: 210.311 (Advanced Spanish) or appropriate placement exam score

Course Number: AS.210.312.11

Distribution: H

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Online Advanced Spanish II

This third-year course aims at improving the students' oral skills by focusing on the use of standard, spoken Spanish with an emphasis on colloquial and idiomatic expressions. Students will also engage in more formal levels of communication by discussing assigned literary and non-literary topics. They will increase their listening skills through movies and other listening comprehension exercises. The course will also focus on vocabulary acquisition. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. * Prerequisites: 210.311 (Advanced Spanish) or appropriate placement exam score

Course Number: AS.210.312.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Spanish Language Practicum Online*

Prerequisites - AS 210.411 The Spanish Language Practicum involves a specially designed project, taking place some time within the summer period of 5/26-7/31, related to student's minor concentration. Provides an opportunity to use Spanish language in real world contexts. May be related to current employment context or developed in agencies or organizations that complement student's research and experimental background while contributing to the improvement of language proficiency. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Please see Dr. Sanchez in advance of registering for this course to discuss your project and timeline.

Course Number: AS.210.412.21

Distribution: H W

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Loreto Sanchez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Who thinks abstractly?: Fundamentals of Critical Theory

This course provides students with a foundation for as well as a brief introduction to Critical Theory. While paying close attention to the texts and the form in which they present themselves, we will explore major concepts such as dialectics, metaphysics, and freedom. Students can expect to gain familiarity with historical works that have proven immensely influential in modern Europe and beyond, but will also be expected to consider ways in which such thinking has relevance for today’s world. Papers dealing directly with ideas from two of the four main units will be required. All texts will be available through Blackboard except Adorno & Horkheimer, Dialectic of Enlightenment. “Additional” readings are flexible and can be tailored to the interests of students.

Course Number: AS.213.319.73

Distribution: H

Term: Mini-Term III

Dates: July 18 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jason Yonover

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 10AM-12PM

T - 10AM-12PM

W - 10AM-12PM

R - 10AM-12PM

F - 10AM-12PM

BACK TO TOP


HISTORY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Topics in Biomedicine

What are some of the main issues and fields that defined medical research and practice after 1945? What were the new physical, technological, and conceptual tools that defined the postwar era of medicine? How did new technologies and research endeavors configure new ways of diagnosing disease, monitoring patients, and delivering medical care and therapies? As students consider the rise of genetics and genetic therapy and organ transplantation as well as the broad implementation of electronics and digital computers after 1945, they will also consider the cultural, social, ethical, and policy-related implications of these various innovations that make up the rise of biomedicine. One main goal of the course is to give students an historical understanding—at least from the last eighty years—of why medical care and therapeutic possibilities are what they are today.

Course Number: AS.140.213.21

Distribution: H S

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Nancy Anderson

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 4-6:30PM

R - 4-6:30PM

F - 4-6:30PM

BACK TO TOP


HUMANITIES CENTER

Existentialism

What is existence and why do we care about it? What happens when we think about the nothing? What is the philosophical significance of issues such as commitment, marriage, death, and suicide, or of feelings such as anxiety, boredom, and nausea? We will considers these themes and read a selection of texts dealing with them by some of the most famous thinkers associated with the existentialist tradition, including Pascal, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus.

Course Number: AS.300.232.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Omid Mehrgan

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 4-6:30PM

W - 4-6:30PM

F - 4-6:30PM

BACK TO TOP


INTERDEPARTMENTAL

Library Research and Research/Grant Proposal Writing

This course offers training to undergraduate and graduate students in humanities and social sciences on the fundamentals of library research and research/grant proposal writing. The course will introduce the students to the major research resources in humanities and social sciences, strategies and techniques to conduct effective research, and how to use library research to enhance research and grant proposal writing. This course aims to help students learn the basics of research and grant proposal writing and develop useful research skills that will benefit them in the long run.

Course Number: AS.360.107.72

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term II

Dates: July 5 - July 15

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Yunshan Ye

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-3PM

T - 1-3PM

W - 1-3PM

R - 1-3PM

F - 1-3PM

Mind, Brain and Beauty

What underlies our perception of visual art and music? Do specific properties of objects, scenes, and musical events evoke consistent emotional responses? Does the perception of beauty lie in the eye of the beholder? What can the creative, artistic process tell us about the mind/brain? Examining such questions from cognitive and computer sciences, neuroscience, psychology, and philosophy, we will explore relevant research, theory and data in the visual and auditory domains as they pertain to art perception and cognition, creativity, and artificial intelligence.

Course Number: AS.360.116.72

Distribution: N S

Term: Mini-Term II

Dates: July 5 - July 15

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 10-12PM

T - 10-12PM

W - 10-12PM

R - 10-12PM

F - 10-12PM

Mind, Brain and Beauty

What underlies our perception of visual art and music? Do specific properties of objects, scenes, and musical events evoke consistent emotional responses? Does the perception of beauty lie in the eye of the beholder? What can the creative, artistic process tell us about the mind/brain? Examining such questions from cognitive and computer sciences, neuroscience, psychology, and philosophy, we will explore relevant research, theory and data in the visual and auditory domains as they pertain to art perception and cognition, creativity, and artificial intelligence.

Course Number: AS.360.116.73

Distribution: N S

Term: Mini-Term III

Dates: July 18 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Monica Lopez-Gonzalez

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 3:15-5:15pm

T - 3:15-5:15pm

W - 3:15-5:15pm

R - 3:15-5:15pm

F - 3:15-5:15pm

A Beautiful Medicine

Integrative medicine considers the human body not as a machine to be repaired when broken, but as a potent mind-body with extraordinary potential for high-level wellness, resilience under duress, and resistance to disease. Changing our disease-care model into a wellness model will be facilitated when we consider the vitality of soul and spirit to be as important as cellular function. We will explore a vision of medicine broader than that of the conventional model as it integrates the biological with the psychological aspects of human experience and focuses on the flourishing of human possibility. David Mercier, M.S., L.Ac., author of A Beautiful Medicine, winner of a Grand and Gold Prize in the 2013 Nautilus Book Awards, will be co-teaching this class with Medical Herbalist Geo Giordano, MSc, RH(AHG)

Course Number: AS.360.139.71

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term I

Dates: June 20 - July 1

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Georganne Giordano & David Mercier

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9-11AM

T - 9-11AM

W - 9-11AM

R - 9-11AM

F - 9-11AM

MCC: College Writing Workshop

This workshop, at our Rockville campus, will cover the fundamentals of expository writing in order to prepare students for college-level assignments. This will not be a lecture course; rather, students will engage in writing and editing exercises that will allow them to accumulate hands-on practice in each of the writing skills discussed. Students will learn to develop argumentative thesis statements that align with strong topic sentences, incorporate quotes and evidence smoothly and with sophistication, and engage in a thorough outlining process that will eliminate "writer's block." We will work through a "Top Ten" editing checklist for final drafts (e.g., cut repetition), practicing each skill. Students will leave the workshop with a new understanding of the practical, step-by-step process that can be used to write any college-level expository essay--and to make writing a manageable, enjoyable experience!

Course Number: AS.360.190.76

Distribution: H

Term: Non-Homewood 2-week, Term 1

Dates: June 20 - July 1

Campus: Montgomery/Rockville Campus

Instructor: Marina Ruben

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-11:30AM

T - 9:30-11:30AM

W - 9:30-11:30AM

R - 9:30-11:30AM

F - 9:30-11:30AM

An Introduction to the Counseling Profession

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the field of counseling as a profession. It will introduce students to and define the subject matter of counseling psychology, the target population the counseling professional seeks to serve, and the theories and technical tools that inform practice. Moreover, the course will provided students with an introduction to basic counseling skills. * Prerequisites: N/A

Course Number: AS.360.220.72

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term II

Dates: July 5 - July 15

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Shane Hart

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 3:30-5:30PM

T - 3:30-5:30PM

W - 3:30-5:30PM

R - 3:30-5:30PM

F - 3:30-5:30PM

Edible Pharmacopeia

We will explore some of the commonly used herbal medicines which support our anatomy and physiology. One class will be devoted to pain management & the emerging use of Cannabinoids. JHU is currently performing a clinical trial on Mistletoe which we will be study, as it’s use is widespread for cancer patients in Europe. We will review current scientific discoveries explaining the cellular pathways and mechanisms that these plants affect in healing. Therapeutic doses, appropriate uses, plus known drug-herb interactions will be highlighted. Students will gain some useful insights into staying well, thinking clearly and optimizing their personal performance during their academic years ahead.

Course Number: AS.360.249.73

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term III

Dates: July 18 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Georganne Giordano

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-3PM

T - 1-3PM

W - 1-3PM

R - 1-3PM

F - 1-3PM

BACK TO TOP


MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

Chocolate: Intro to Materials Science

This course will introduce students to some basic concepts in materials science including phase diagrams, crystallization, and various characterization techniques, all through the close examination of chocolate. Students will have the opportunity to try some of their own experiments to see these processes in action. This course is directed toward freshman or sophomore engineering and natural science students with no background in these topics. Love of chocolate is a must. * Prerequisites: High school chemistry, physics, and precalc, but no college thermodynamics

Course Number: EN.510.105.71

Distribution: N

Term: Mini-Term I

Dates: June 20 - July 1

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jennifer Dailey

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 10-12PM

T - 10-12PM

W - 10-12PM

R - 10-12PM

F - 10-12PM

BACK TO TOP


MATHEMATICS

Introduction to Calculus

This course starts from scratch and provides students with all the background necessary for the study of calculus. It includes a review of algebra, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, coordinates and graphs. Each of these tools will be introduced in its cultural and historical context. The concept of the rate of change of a function will be introduced. Not open to students who have studied calculus in high school.

Course Number: AS.110.105.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Po-Yao Chang

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:30AM-12PM

T - 9:30AM-12PM

W - 9:30AM-12PM

R - 9:30AM-12PM

Calculus II (Biology & Social Sciences)

Differential and integral Calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, introduction to differential equations, functions of several variables, linear systems, applications for systems of linear differential equations, probability distributions. Applications to the biological and social sciences will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.107.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Apurv Nakade

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

T - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Calculus I (Physical Sciences & Engineering)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.108.22

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Emmett Wyman

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9:30AM-12PM

T - 9:30AM-12PM

W - 9:30AM-12PM

R - 9:30AM-12PM

Calculus II (Physical Sciences & Engineering)

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.109.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Zehua Zhao

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

T - 9-11:30AM

W - 9-11:30AM

R - 9-11:30AM

Online Calculus II

Course Dates: 6/6-7/29. Non-JHU students must be fully registered by June 1 in order to participate in the course. Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Course Number: AS.110.109.88

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Joseph Cutrone & Alexa Gaines

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Linear Algebra

Vector spaces, matrices, and linear transformations. Solutions of systems of linear equations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and diagonalization of matrices. Applications to differential equations. * Prerequisites: Calculus I. Recommended: Calculus II.

Course Number: AS.110.201.11

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Nitu Kitchloo

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

T - 9-11:30AM

W - 9-11:30AM

R - 9-11:30AM

Online Linear Algebra

Course Dates: 6/6-7/29. Non-JHU students must register by June 1 in order to participate in the course. Vector spaces, matrices, and linear transformations. Solutions of systems of linear equations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and diagonalization of matrices. Applications to differential equations. * Prerequisites: Calculus I, recommended Calculus II.

Course Number: AS.110.201.88

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Harry Lang & Stephen Cattell

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Calculus III

Calculus of functions of more than one variable: partial derivatives, and applications; multiple integrals, line and surface integrals; Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Gauss' Divergence Theorem. * Prerequisites: Calc II (110.107 or 110.109); or Honors One Variable Calculus (110.113)

Course Number: AS.110.202.21

Distribution: Q

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Cheng Zhang

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

T - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Online Calculus III

Course Dates: 6/6-7/29. Non-JHU students must register by June 1 in order to participate in the course. Calculus of Several Variables. Calculus of functions of more than one variable: partial derivatives, and applications; multiple integrals, line and surface integrals; Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Gauss' Divergence Theorem. * Prerequisites: Calc I and Calc II or Honors One Variable Calculus

Course Number: AS.110.202.88

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Vitaly Lorman & Jon Beardsley

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Differential Equations with Applications

This is an applied course in ordinary differential equations, which is primarily for students in the biological, physical and social sciences, and engineering. The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with the techniques of solving ordinary differential equations. The specific subjects to be covered include first order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, applications to electric circuits, oscillation of solutions, power series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, autonomous systems, Laplace transforms and linear differential equations, mathematical models (e.g., in the sciences or economics). * Prerequisites: Calculus II

Course Number: AS.110.302.11

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jordan Paschke

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

T - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Online Differential Equations with Apps (6/6-7/29)

Course Dates: 6/6-7/29. Non-JHU students must register by June 1 in order to participate in the course. This is an applied course in ordinary differential equations, which is primarily for students in the biological, physical and social sciences, and engineering. Techniques for solving ordinary differential equations are studied. Topics covered include first order differential equations, second order linear differential equations, applications to electric circuits, oscillation of solutions, power series solutions, systems of linear differential equations, autonomous systems, Laplace transforms and linear differential equations, mathematical models (e.g., in the sciences or economics). * Prerequisites: Calculus II

Course Number: AS.110.302.88

Distribution: Q

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Dan Ginsberg & Nicholas Marshburn

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

BACK TO TOP


NEUROSCIENCE

An Introduction to Neuroscience

Our knowledge of brain function from the level of single molecules to human behavior continues to expand at something approaching light speed. That knowledge invades our lives every day. And decisions are made based on that knowledge from every corner of life…from physician to politician and every stop in between. This course is meant to provide a fundamental understanding of how the cells and molecules as well as the regions and systems of the brain work to have you see and hear and move and remember. The course is divided into four sections that progress from the cells of the brain and spinal cord to circuits then systems and finally behaviors. Introduction to Neuroscience is designed for any college student who has an interest in the range of disciplines we call neuroscience.

Course Number: AS.080.105.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Stewart Hendry

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9:30-11:10AM

T - 9:30-11:10AM

W - 9:30-11:10AM

R - 9:30-11:10AM

F - 9:30-11:10AM

Nervous System I*

The Nervous System is a fully integrated, two-semester course that surveys the cellular and molecular biology of neurons as well as the structure and function of the nervous system. Students must register for Nervous System II offered in the second term. Course open to JHU undergraduates only. * Prerequisites: AS 080.105 or AS 080.203 or AS 200.141 or Permission. Open to JHU Undergraduates only

Course Number: AS.080.305.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Stewart Hendry

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-2:45PM

T - 1-2:45PM

W - 1-2:45PM

R - 1-2:45PM

F - 1-2:45PM

Nervous System II*

The course uses the functional organization of the somatosensory system as a means to examine mechanisms of neutral development. Generation and maturation of neurons, guidance of axons, formation of synapses and the regressive events that shape the adult nervous system will be examined. At the same time we will explore the structure and function of brain regions that allow us to feel pain and temperature, detect vibration, recognize shape and perceive where we are in space. Finally, the single-neuron events that lead to adaptive changes in function will be explored in the context of central nervous system control of movement and of higher order functions of speech and memory. Students who do not register for Nervous System I offered during the first term should not register for this class. Course open to JHU undergraduates only. * Prerequisites: AS.080.305 and AS.080.203. Open to JHU Undergraduates only

Course Number: AS.080.306.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Stewart Hendry

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-2:45PM

T - 1-2:45PM

W - 1-2:45PM

R - 1-2:45PM

F - 1-2:45PM

BACK TO TOP


PHILOSOPHY

Introduction to Philosophy

A topics-based introduction to the history and methods of philosophical reflection. We will consider several of the most important perennial questions of philosophy, primarily from some of the most significant thinkers in the history of Western philosophy (with the addition of Eastern and contemporary authors). Topics include: What is philosophy? Does God exist? What can we know? What is human nature? How should we live and act?

Course Number: AS.150.130.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Stephen Ogden

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

F - 1-3:30PM

Minds and Machines

The course is a philosophical introduction to the topic of artificial intelligence. We will examine such questions as whether machines can think and whether we can build robots that have emotions, personalities and a sense of self. In doing so, we will touch upon a closely connected question: is the human mind itself a machine?

Course Number: AS.150.216.11

Distribution: H N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Nikola Andonovski

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Philosophy of Oppression and Resistance*

Human social structures can be oppressive in either explicit or covert forms, even in societies highly committed to just democratic ideals. The course will investigate what it means for an individual, practice, or institution to be oppressive, and will explore the concrete mechanisms which can underlie racialized and gendered forms of oppression in particular. Special attention will be given to the political and moral problems raised by hate speech, pornography, propaganda, ideology, and material inequality. Finally, we will discuss how social agents can resist explicit and covert oppression in a way that is conducive to the realization of just ideals. * Prerequisites: One philosophy course

Course Number: AS.150.325.11

Distribution: H W

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Kevin Powell

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 6-8:30PM

W - 6-8:30PM

F - 6-8:30PM

BACK TO TOP


PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY

General Physics: Physical Science Major I*

Lectures on general principles illustrated by experiments provide a thorough introductory study of physics. Conference periods, assigned in the first class, offer more detailed discussion of principles and the solution of problems. The first term covers mechanics and thermodynamics. The second term addresses electricity and magnetism, optics, and selected topics in modern physics. Students are required to have received credit for Calculus I or be enrolled concurrently with this course. Note: General Physics lab is not required as a co-requisite but is strongly recommended * Prerequisites: 110.106 or 110.108

Course Number: AS.171.101.11

Distribution: N E

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Marek Cieplak

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

T - 9-11:30AM

W - 9-11:30AM

R - 9-11:30AM

F - 9-11:30AM

General Physics: Physical Science Major II*

Lectures on general principles illustrated by experiments provide a thorough introductory study of physics. Conference periods, assigned in the first class, offer more detailed discussion of principles and the solution of problems. The first term covers mechanics and thermodynamics. The second term addresses electricity and magnetism, optics, and selected topics in modern physics. Students are required to have received credit for Calculus II or be enrolled concurrently with this course. Note: General Physics lab is not required as a co-requisite but is strongly recommended. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: 110.107 or 110.109

Course Number: AS.171.102.21

Distribution: N E

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Marek Cieplak

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 4

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

T - 9-11:30AM

W - 9-11:30AM

R - 9-11:30AM

F - 9-11:30AM

Subatomic World

Introduction to the concepts of physics of the subatomic world: symmetries, relativity, quanta, neutrinos, particles and fields. The course traces the history of our description of the physical world from the Greeks through Faraday and Maxwell to quantum mechanics in the early 20th century and on through nuclear physics and particle physics. The emphasis is on the ideas of modern physics, not on the mathematics. Intended for non-science majors.

Course Number: AS.171.113.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Barry Blumenfeld

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

F - 1-3:30PM

Stars & the Universe: Cosmic Evolution

This course looks at the evolution of the universe from its origin in a cosmic explosion to emergence of life on Earth and possibly other planets throughout the universe. Topics include big-bang cosmology; origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, planets, life, and intelligence; black holes; quasars; and relativity theory. The material is largely descriptive, based on insights from physics, astronomy, geology, chemistry, biology, and anthropology. Course website: http://henry.pha.jhu.edu/stars.html. * Prerequisites: High school algebra, geometry, trigonometry

Course Number: AS.171.118.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Wei Zheng

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 9-11:30AM

W - 9-11:30AM

R - 9-11:30AM

Black Holes and Other Compact Objects: For Non-Majors

This is a lecture and discussion course aimed at undergraduate students who are not physics and astronomy majors. The topic of the lectures will be a basic overview of the qualitative properties of and historical work on compact astrophysical objects (such as black holes, neutron stars, white dwarfs) and related phenomena. * Prerequisites: None.

Course Number: AS.171.133.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Justin Bankert

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 11AM-1PM

T - 11AM-1PM

W - 11AM-1PM

R - 11AM-1PM

General Physics Laboratory I*

Experiments performed in the lab provide further illustration of the principles discussed in General Physics. While this lab course lab is not required as a co-requisite of the corresponding General Physics lecture course it is strongly recommended. Note: First and second terms must be taken in sequence.

Course Number: AS.173.111.11

Distribution: N

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jonathan Mumford

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-4PM

T - 1-4PM

R - 1-4PM

F - 1-4PM

General Physics Laboratory II*

Experiments performed in the lab provide further illustration of the principles discussed in General Physics. Students are required to take this course concurrently with General Physics unless they already have received credit for the lab. Note: First and second terms must be taken in sequence. * Prerequisites: Co-requisite 171.102

Course Number: AS.173.112.21

Distribution: N

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jonathan Mumford

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-4PM

T - 1-4PM

R - 1-4PM

F - 1-4PM

BACK TO TOP


POLITICAL SCIENCE

Politics of East Asia

This course examines some of the central ideas and institutions that have transformed politics in the contemporary world through the lens of East Asia, focusing on Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and China. We analyze two enduring themes of classic and contemporary scholarship in comparative politics: development and democracy. The purpose is to introduce students to the various schools of thought within comparative politics as well as to the central debates concerning East Asian politics.

Course Number: AS.190.109.21

Distribution: S

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Erin Chung

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 3-5:30PM

W - 3-5:30PM

F - 3-5:30PM

American Politics in Film

This class uses film to explore a central question in American politics: what is the relationship between the public and those who endeavor to represent them? Over the course of several weeks, we will address this question by viewing Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, A Face in the Crowd, The Candidate, Wag the Dog, and The Ides of March. We will use these films to discuss how political institutions, the media, and money shape our politics. We will also consider how the representation of politics in film has changed over time.

Course Number: AS.190.110.21

Distribution: S

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Adam Sheingate

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

W - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Diet, Politics, and Identity

Tracing the history of the idea that "you are what you eat," this course explores the relationships between diets, bodies, selves, and politics. The class examines three historical periods: the classical and early modern humoral tradition emphasizing the incorporation of the properties of foods; the nineteenth and twentieth century nutritionist tradition emphasizing the incorporation of the ingredients or nutrients of a food; and the newly emerging eco-dietetic tradition emphasizing the environmental ramifications an item of food’s production.

Course Number: AS.191.113.11

Distribution: H S

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Arthur Rebrovick

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 10AM-12:30PM

T - 10AM-12:30PM

R - 10AM-12:30PM

"Ruthless Criticism": Marx, Nietzsche, Foucault

In 1844 Karl Marx called for a “ruthless criticism of everything existing” – a philosophical critique of social, economic, religious, and political conditions unafraid of its own conclusions or of “the powers that be”. This course explores how Marx and two other major philosophical critics of modern society, Friedrich Nietzsche and Michel Foucault, engage in a practice of “ruthless criticism” and what they seek to get out of it. In particular, we examine how these three philosophers understand (1) the relationship between history and social criticism, (2) the operation of power in the modern capitalist social order, and (3) the possibility of revolution and freedom. In addition to serving as an introduction to the thought of Marx, Nietzsche, and Foucault, we ask how these philosophers build on and depart from one another, and how their approaches inform contemporary political issues, debates, and activism. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.191.214.11

Distribution: H S

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Patrick Giamario

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 3-5:30PM

W - 3-5:30PM

R - 3-5:30PM

Cognitive-Behavioral Political Theory

In this class, we will read scholarly work in cognitive-behavioral therapy and political theory. We will explore the way different traditions understand themselves to be "problem-solving." How do political problems differ from the problems psychotherapy confronts? What can the similarities and difference between the two disciplines teach us about problem solving in each domain?

Course Number: AS.191.387.73

Distribution: H S

Term: Mini-Term III

Dates: July 18 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Joseph Mohorcich

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 5-7PM

T - 5-7PM

W - 5-7PM

R - 5-7PM

F - 5-7PM

BACK TO TOP


PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

Principles of Marketing

This course explores the role of marketing in society and within the organization. It examines the process of developing, pricing, promoting and distributing products to consumer and business markets and shows how marketing managers use the elements of the marketing mix to gain a competitive advantage. Through interactive, application-oriented exercises, case videotapes, a guest speaker (local marketer), and a group project, students will have ample opportunity to observe key marketing concepts in action. The group project requires each team to research the marketing plan for an existing product of its choice. Teams will analyze what is currently being done by the organization, choose one of the strategic growth alternatives studied, and recommend why this alternative should be adopted. The recommendations will include how the current marketing plan will need to be modified in order to implement this strategy.

Course Number: EN.660.250.21

Distribution:

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Leslie Kendrick

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1-3:30PM

T - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

Social Media & Marketing*

This online course explores strategies for monitoring and engaging consumers in digital media. Students will gain practical knowledge about developing, implementing and measuring social media marketing campaigns. They will learn how to analyze what consumers are saying and connect with them by leveraging word of mouth, viral and buzz marketing through sites like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. A series of assignments build upon each other toward a final social media marketing plan for a selected consumer product or service. No on-campus components required. No audits. * Prerequisites: EN.660.250 Principles of Marketing

Course Number: EN.660.453.88

Distribution: W

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Keith Quesenberry

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Professional Writing & Communication

This course teaches students to communicate effectively with a wide variety of specialized and non-specialized audiences. Projects include production of resumes, cover letters, proposals, instructions, reports, and other relevant documents. Class emphasizes writing clearly and persuasively, creating appropriate visuals, developing oral presentation skills, working in collaborative groups, giving and receiving feedback, and simulating the real world environment in which most communication occurs. No audits.

Course Number: EN.661.110.88

Distribution: W

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Robert Graham

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Oral Presentations

This course is designed to help students push through any anxieties about public speaking by immersing them in a practice-intensive environment. They learn how to speak with confidence in a variety of formats and venues - Including extemporaneous speaking, job interviewing, leading a discussion, presenting a technical speech, and other relevant scenarios.

Course Number: EN.661.250.21

Distribution: W

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Laura Davis

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

F - 1-3:30PM

Culture of the Engineering Profession*

This course focuses on building understanding of the culture of engineering while preparing students to communicate effectively with the various audiences with whom engineers interact. Working from a base of contemporary science writing (monographs, non-fiction, popular literature and fiction), students will engage in discussion, argument, case study and project work to investigate: the engineering culture and challenges to that culture, the impacts of engineering solutions on society, the ethical guidelines for the profession, and the ways engineering information is conveyed to the range of audiences for whom the information is critical. Additionally, students will master many of the techniques critical to successful communication within the engineering culture through a series of short papers and presentations associated with analysis of the writings and cases. No audits. WSE sophomores, juniors, and seniors or by instructor approval

Course Number: EN.661.315.88

Distribution: S W

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Robert Graham

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

BACK TO TOP


PSYCHOLOGICAL & BRAIN SCIENCES

Childhood Disorders/Treatments: Online

This is an online course. The class will meet for ten weeks from May 23 through July 29 and will follow the deadlines for Term I for add/drop/withdraw and grade changes. This course examines the psychological disorders that are usually first diagnosed prior to adulthood. Some of the specific disorders that will be discussed are Attention-Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders, Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Learning Disorders and Intellectual Disability. Students will become familiar with various diagnoses, etiologies, and methods of treatment.

Course Number: AS.200.162.87

Distribution: S

Term: Term I Terms I and II

Dates: Dependant on term

Campus: Online Course

Instructor: Ann Jarema

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - ONLINE

T - ONLINE

W - ONLINE

R - ONLINE

F - ONLINE

Research Seminar in Clinical Psychology

A small group exploration of current issues in clinical psychology, aimed at developing students’ empirical research skills. Following critical analysis of the empirical literature, students develop research proposals for novel research and/or conduct research and author research reports. Topics vary by semester. In the current offering, the topic will be stress, coping, emotion-regulation, peer relationships, and psychopathology among adolescents and emerging adults. * Prerequisites: AS.200.212

Course Number: AS.200.379.11

Distribution: S W

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Alison Papadakis

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 10AM-12:30PM

W - 10AM-12:30PM

R - 10AM-12:30PM

BACK TO TOP


PUBLIC HEALTH STUDIES

Introduction to International Nutrition

The course presents a broad overview of international public health nutrition, including: main nutritional problems in developing countries, causes and consequences of malnutrition, and multi-level approaches for the prevention and treatment of malnutrition. Grades will be based on class attendance, participation, and a presentation that describes the key nutrition indicators for a low-income country of the student's choice, and proposes an intervention to address the country's nutrition challenges.

Course Number: AS.280.203.72

Distribution:

Term: Mini-Term II

Dates: July 5 - July 15

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jillian Emerson

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 3:15-5:15pm

T - 3:15-5:15pm

W - 3:15-5:15pm

R - 3:15-5:15pm

F - 3:15-5:15pm

Health, Homelessness and Social Justice

Homelessness is bad for one’s health, and its existence, persistence, and growth demonstrate deep ills in public policy and political economy. This course examines issues fundamental to the modern phenomena of homelessness in the U.S. – and the connection between disparate health and desperate inequality. There are ethical values and dimensions to the decisions we make about health policy – and public policy generally. Life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness, equality, justice, community, democracy, human rights, and human flourishing; there are many values that we might prioritize – both individually and collectively – as we develop and assess programs, policies, and systems. In this course, we will consider these and other values together with issues of health and homelessness. We will also examine tools of policy analysis and political action, and how those committed to changing the world can use those tools to engage that system critically.

Course Number: AS.280.224.21

Distribution: S

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Adam Schneider

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 5:30-8PM

R - 5:30-8PM

F - 5:30-8PM

Responding to Disasters:Earthquakes to Ebola

Responding to Disasters is a methods-based course that introduces students to the fundamentals of humanitarian and disaster response. The course is divided into four topic areas: (1) fundamentals of humanitarian emergencies, (2) methods in humanitarian emergency settings, (3) refugee health, and (4) emerging issues in humanitarian response. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.280.303.21

Distribution: S

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Jeffrey Freeman

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 10:30AM-1PM

R - 10:30AM-1PM

F - 10:30AM-1PM

BACK TO TOP


THEATRE ARTS AND STUDIES

Theatre and Religion: East and West

Beginning with the emergence of Paleolithic spiritual performance through the theatre of Ancient Greece, the Indian Sanskrit drama, and Medieval European, Chinese and Japanese theatre forms, we will explore plays that reflect the thought behind ancient religions, illuminated by religious and philosophical texts. We conclude with a look at the influence of of these theatrical forms and spiritual philosophies on innovative theatre of modern times.

Course Number: AS.225.335.21

Distribution:

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Joseph Martin

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 3-5:30PM

W - 3-5:30PM

F - 3-5:30PM

BACK TO TOP


WRITING SEMINARS

Words of Light: Poetry and Photography

This course examines the role of lyric poetry in a media culture that has become obsessed with photographs. In a world where everyone with a cell phone is a photographer – and every literate person a writer – how do we create valuable work? We will pair genres of photography and lyric poetry in discussion – landscape photos and poems of place, for example – and view each through the other. Students will read a body of poetry and criticism (prose by Walter Benjamin, Susan Sontag, Penelope Pelizzon, Roland Barthes, et al.). In addition to bringing worthwhile comments on the readings to each class, students will submit one original poem and one original photo each week for credit. * Prerequisites: Each student is required to have a device capable of taking digital photos. Cell phones are fine.

Course Number: AS.220.152.11

Distribution: H

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Songmuang Greer

Syllabus: Download (.docx)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 4-6:30PM

R - 4-6:30PM

F - 4-6:30PM

Writing for Children: The Tales We Can't Seem to Forget

In this summer mini-course, students will use canonical works of children's literature to inspire their own stories and verses, which they will read aloud and discuss in a workshop setting. We will focus on the uses and reuses of fairy and folk tales -- from early works compiled by the Brothers Grimm and Charles Perrault to fantasies from the Victorian era by Mary de Morgan and Oscar Wilde. We will end with contemporary reimaginings by Roald Dahl, Neil Gaiman, Angela Carter and Lauren Child. Class will include discussion of illustration, recent trends in children's literature, and the publishing process. Course instructor Sarah Smith is the former Children's Book editor at the New York Times Book Review.

Course Number: AS.220.162.71

Distribution: H

Term: Mini-Term I

Dates: June 20 - July 1

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Sarah Smith

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 2-4PM

T - 2-4PM

W - 2-4PM

R - 2-4PM

F - 2-4PM

Serious Nonsense: Light & Comic Poetry

This course will provide a guided tour of some of the funniest poems ever written in English. Genres covered will include light verse, satire, parody, absurdism (“nonsense”), and others. We’ll explore the serious side of comic poetry and vice versa. Students will have the opportunity to write their own comic verse in the genres discussed.

Course Number: AS.220.167.72

Distribution: H

Term: Mini-Term II

Dates: July 5 - July 15

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Austin Allen

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 1

Days & Times:

M - 1-3PM

T - 1-3PM

W - 1-3PM

R - 1-3PM

F - 1-3PM

Introduction to Dramatic Writing: Film

Screenwriting workshop. This course will look at the screenplay as both a literary text and blue-print for production. Several classic screenplays will be analyzed. Students will then embark on pitching, outlining and writing their own scripts. We will intensively focus on character development, creating "cinematic" dialogue, plot development, conflict, pacing, dramatic foreshadowing, the element of surprise, text and subtext and visual story-telling. Several classic and contemporary films will be analyzed and discussed (PSYCHO, CHINATOWN, BLADE RUNNER, WINTER'S BONE, THE SOCIAL NETWORK). Students will learn professional screenplay format and write an 8-12 page screenplay that will be read aloud in class and critiqued.

Course Number: AS.220.204.11

Distribution: H W

Term: Term I

Dates: May 23 - June 24

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Marc Lapadula

Syllabus: Download (.pdf)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

M - 1:30-5:15PM

W - 1:30-5:15PM

Forming The Short Story

In the early 1800s popular writers began to compress novel-like narrations into much shorter forms. By the 1880s what we recognize today as the short story had emerged. In this course we will trace the development of the form from its earliest stirrings in the tales of ETA Hoffmann through the Russians Pushkin, Gogol, and Turgenev, to its apotheosis in the stories of Chekhov and Wharton. Critical responses will be creative, using short sketches to experiment with the techniques, some adopted others rejected, and constraints experienced by writers along the way. * Prerequisites: None

Course Number: AS.220.329.21

Distribution: H

Term: Term II

Dates: June 27 - July 29

Campus: Homewood Campus

Instructor: Tristan Davies

Syllabus: Download (.doc)

Credits: 3

Days & Times:

T - 1-3:30PM

R - 1-3:30PM

F - 1-3:30PM

BACK TO TOP

Download
Course Selector Tool
Meet the Faculty
John D. Rockefeller V

John D. Rockefeller V, Ph.D.

Dr. Rockefeller lectures for The Writing Seminars.

Mark Blyth

Marek Cieplak, Ph.D.

Dr. Marek Cieplak is involved in experimental and theoretical studies of proteins.

Place Holder Quote
Other Programs

Study Abroad

Study with Hopkins in South Africa, Ireland or London this summer.
More Information >

ESL

Sharpen and refine your speaking, reading, listening, and writing skills, or improve your test scores.
More Information >