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Differential Equations with Applications - AS.110.302

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 5 - August 5 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This is a course in ordinary differential equations (ODEs), equations involving an unknown function of one independent variable and some of its derivatives, and is primarily a course in the study of the structure of and techniques for solving ODEs as mathematical models. Specific topics include first and second ODEs of various types, systems of linear differential equations, autonomous systems, and the qualitative and quantitative analysis of nonlinear systems of first-order ODEs. Laplace transforms, series solutions and the basics of numerical solutions are included as extra topics.

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in 110.107 or 110.109 or 110.113, or a 5 on the AP BC exam. 

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Mathematics
Class Schedule
Monday
1:00PM-3:30PM
Tuesday
1:00PM-3:30PM
Wednesday
1:00PM-3:30PM
Thursday
1:00PM-3:30PM

Discrete Mathematics - EN.553.171

Undergraduate students May 31 - July 1 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Introduction to the mathematics of finite systems. Logic; Boolean algebra; induction and recursion; sets, functions, relations, equivalence, and partially ordered sets; elementary combinatorics; modular arithmetic and the Euclidean algorithm; group theory; permutations and symmetry groups; graph theory. Selected applications. The concept of a proof and development of the ability to recognize and construct proofs are part of the course. 

Prerequisites: Students may not earn credit for EN.553.171 and EN.553.172. EN.553.171 may not be taken after EN.553.471, EN.553.472, EN.553.671, or EN.553.672.

Corequisites: EN.553.171 may not be taken concurrently with EN.553.471, EN.553.472, EN.553.671, or EN.553.672.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
EN Applied Mathematics & Statistics
Instructor
Fishkind, Donniell
Class Schedule
Monday
12:00PM- 3:15PM
Tuesday
12:00PM- 3:15PM
Wednesday
12:00PM- 3:15PM
Thursday
12:00PM- 3:15PM

Elementary Number Theory - AS.110.304

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 6 - July 29 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

The student is provided with many historical examples of topics, each of which serves as an illustration of and provides a background for many years of current research in number theory. Primes and prime factorization, congruences, Euler's function, quadratic reciprocity, primitive roots, solutions to polynomial congruences (Chevalley's theorem), Diophantine equations including the Pythagorean and Pell equations, Gaussian integers, Dirichlet's theorem on primes.

Prerequisite:Grade of C- or better in AS.110.201 or AS.110.212.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded to view any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Mathematics

Elements of Macroeconomics - AS.180.101

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 31 - July 1 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course introduces the basic tools of macroeconomics and teaches how they are applied to real world economic policy. Throughout the course, the main goals will be to a) study economic aggregates such as the overall price level; the unemployment rate and the GDP b)understand how they relate to each other. Attention will be given to fiscal and monetary policies. We will also analyze the recent COVID crisis and its impact on the economic activity.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Social Sciences
Department
Economics
Instructor
Kodua, Nino
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-paced
Tuesday
Self-paced
Wednesday
Self-paced
Thursday
Self-paced
Friday
Self-paced

Elements of Microeconomics - AS.180.102

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 31 - July 1 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Social Sciences
Department
Economics
Instructor
Zheng, Xudong
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-paced
Tuesday
Self-paced
Wednesday
Self-paced
Thursday
Self-paced
Friday
Self-paced

Elements of Microeconomics - AS.180.102

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 5 - August 5 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An introductory course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomic analysis. Topics covered include the theory of consumer and producer behavior, market demand and supply, forms of market structure, concepts of equilibrium & efficiency. Applications include questions in trade, industrial organization, labor economics, public finance, and welfare economics.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Social Sciences
Department
Economics
Instructor
Ghosh, Aniruddha
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-paced
Tuesday
Self-paced
Wednesday
Self-paced
Thursday
Self-paced
Friday
Self-paced

Epidemics, Pandemics, and Outbreaks - AS.360.146

Pre-College students June 27 - July 8 Online
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In the midst of a global pandemic that has shifted the ways in which we move, work, and interact with others around the world, it is more important than ever to have a deeper understanding of how outbreaks, epidemics, and pandemics have evolved. You’ll review select communicable (COVID-19, Ebola, Zika, and HIV) and non-communicable (diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, injury, and mental health) diseases in public health around the world. Examine the global burden of these diseases and the various forms of prevention efforts undertaken by global and national organizations. This program will use a combination of lecture, discussion, and student presentation format to encourage broad participation.

This self-paced program is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for your important program deadlines.

Prerequisite: There are no prerequisites for this program.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and video resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health
Department
Interdepartmental
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-paced
Tuesday
Self-paced
Wednesday
Self-paced
Thursday
Self-paced
Friday
Self-paced

Epidemics, Pandemics, and Outbreaks - AS.360.146

Pre-College students June 27 - July 8 Online
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In the midst of a global pandemic that has shifted the ways in which we move, work, and interact with others around the world, it is more important than ever to have a deeper understanding of how outbreaks, epidemics, and pandemics have evolved. You’ll review select communicable (COVID-19, Ebola, Zika, and HIV) and non-communicable (diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, injury, and mental health) diseases in public health around the world. Examine the global burden of these diseases and the various forms of prevention efforts undertaken by global and national organizations. This program will use a combination of lecture, discussion, and student presentation format to encourage broad participation.

This self-paced program is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for your important program deadlines.

Prerequisite: There are no prerequisites for this program.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and video resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health
Department
Interdepartmental
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-paced
Tuesday
Self-paced
Wednesday
Self-paced
Thursday
Self-paced
Friday
Self-paced

Epidemics, Pandemics, and Outbreaks - AS.360.146

Pre-College students July 25 - August 5 Online
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In the midst of a global pandemic that has shifted the ways in which we move, work, and interact with others around the world, it is more important than ever to have a deeper understanding of how outbreaks, epidemics, and pandemics have evolved. You’ll review select communicable (COVID-19, Ebola, Zika, and HIV) and non-communicable (diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, injury, and mental health) diseases in public health around the world. Examine the global burden of these diseases and the various forms of prevention efforts undertaken by global and national organizations. This program will use a combination of lecture, discussion, and student presentation format to encourage broad participation.

This self-paced program is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for your important program deadlines.

Prerequisite: There are no prerequisites for this program.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and video resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health
Department
Interdepartmental
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-paced
Tuesday
Self-paced
Wednesday
Self-paced
Thursday
Self-paced
Friday
Self-paced

Gateway Computing: JAVA - EN.500.112

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 5 - August 5 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course introduces fundamental programming concepts and techniques, and is intended for all who plan to develop computational artifacts or intelligently deploy computational tools in their studies and careers. Topics covered include the design and implementation of algorithms using variables, control structures, arrays, functions, files, testing, debugging, and structured program design. Elements of object-oriented programming. algorithmic efficiency and data visualization are also introduced. Students deploy programming to develop working solutions that address problems in engineering, science and other areas of contemporary interest that vary from section to section. Course homework involves significant programming. Attendance and participation in class sessions are expected.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
EN General Engineering

Gateway Computing: Python - EN.500.113

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 31 - July 1 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course introduces fundamental programming concepts and techniques, and is intended for all who plan to develop computational artifacts or intelligently deploy computational tools in their studies and careers. Topics covered include the design and implementation of algorithms using variables, control structures, arrays, functions, files, testing, debugging, and structured program design. Elements of object-oriented programming. algorithmic efficiency and data visualization are also introduced. Students deploy programming to develop working solutions that address problems in engineering, science and other areas of contemporary interest that vary from section to section. Course homework involves significant programming. Attendance and participation in class sessions are expected.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
EN General Engineering

General Biology I - AS.020.151

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 31 - July 1 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course is an introduction to biology from an evolutionary, molecular and cellular perspective. Specific topics and themes include evolutionary theory, the structure and function of biological molecules, mechanisms of harvesting energy, cell division, classical genetics and gene expression. This section will involve in-class problem solving and the use of assigned pre-class videos and questions.

Prerequisite: AP Biology.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Biology
Instructor
Shingles, Richard
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-Paced
Wednesday
Self-Paced
Friday
Self-Paced

General Biology II - AS.020.152

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 5 - August 5 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course builds on the concepts presented and discussed in General Biology I. The primary foci of this course will be on the diversity of life and on the anatomy, physiology, and evolution of plants and animals. There will be a special emphasis on human biology.

Prerequisite: AP Biology.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Biology
Instructor
Shingles, Richard
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-paced
Tuesday
Self-paced
Wednesday
Self-paced
Thursday
Self-paced
Friday
Self-paced

General Physics for Physical Science Majors (AL) II - AS.171.108

Undergraduate students July 5 - August 5 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This two-semester sequence in general physics is identical in subject matter to AS.171.101-AS.171.102, covering mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics, but differs in instructional format. Rather than being presented via lectures and discussion sections, it is instead taught in an "active learning" style with most class time given to small group problem-solving guided by instructors. 

Recommended Course Background: A grade of C- or better in either Physics I or the first semester of Engineering Mechanics ( AS.171.101 or AS.171.103 or AS.171.105 or AS.171.107 or EN.530.103 )

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Physics & Astronomy

General Physics for Physical Sciences Majors (AL) I - AS.171.107

Undergraduate students May 31 - July 1 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This two-semester sequence in general physics is identical in subject matter to AS.171.101-AS.171.102, covering mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics, but differs in instructional format. Rather than being presented via lectures and discussion sections, it is instead taught in an "active learning" style with most class time given to small group problem-solving guided by instructors. Midterm exams for every section are given during the 8 AM section time! Accordingly, students registering for sections at times other than 8 AM must retain availability for 8 AM sections as needed.

Recommended Corequisites: AS.173.111 and AS.110.106 or AS.110.108 or AS.110.113.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Physics & Astronomy

General Physics Laboratory I - AS.173.111

Undergraduate students May 31 - July 1 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Experiments performed in the lab provide further illustration of the principles discussed in General Physics. While this lab course lab is not required as a co-requisite of the corresponding General Physics lecture course it is strongly recommended. Note: First and second terms must be taken in sequence.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Physics & Astronomy

General Physics Laboratory II - AS.173.112

Undergraduate students July 5 - August 5 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Experiments performed in the lab provide further illustration of the principles discussed in General Physics. While this lab course lab is not required as a co-requisite of the corresponding General Physics lecture course it is strongly recommended. Note: First and second terms must be taken in sequence.

Prerequisite: AS.171.101 or AS.171.102 or AS.171.104 or AS.171.106 or AS.171.108.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Physics & Astronomy

Genetics - AS.020.303

Undergraduate students July 5 - August 5 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Presentation of the principles of heredity and variation, and their application to evolution and development; physico-chemical nature of the gene; problems of recombination; gene action.

Students may receive credit for AS.020.330 or AS.020.303, but not both.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Biology
Instructor
Fisher, Emily
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-paced
Tuesday
Self-paced
Wednesday
Self-paced
Thursday
Self-paced
Friday
Self-paced

Intermediate Spanish I - AS.210.211

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 31 - July 1 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish I is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained an advanced elementary level in the language. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish I will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Intermediate Spanish II).There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 or appropriate webcape score.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Humanities
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Intermediate Spanish I - AS.210.211

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 5 - August 5 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish I is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained an advanced elementary level in the language. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish I will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Intermediate Spanish II).There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 or appropriate webcape score.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Humanities
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Intermediate Spanish II - AS.210.212

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 31 - July 1 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish II is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained a mid-intermediate level in the language or who have completed Spanish 212. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish II will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Advanced Spanish I).There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory. 

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 or appropriate webcape score.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Humanities
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Intermediate Spanish II - AS.210.212

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 5 - August 5 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish II is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained a mid-intermediate level in the language or who have completed Spanish 212. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish II will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Advanced Spanish I).There is no final exam. May not be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory.

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 or appropriate webcape score.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Humanities
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Introduction to Abstract Algebra - AS.110.401

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 6 - July 29 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An introduction to the basic notions of modern abstract algebra and can serve as as Introduction to Proofs (IP) course. This course is an introduction to group theory, with an emphasis on concrete examples, and especially on geometric symmetry groups. The course will introduce basic notions (groups, subgroups, homomorphisms, quotients) and prove foundational results (Lagrange's theorem, Cauchy's theorem, orbit-counting techniques, the classification of finite abelian groups). Examples to be discussed include permutation groups, dihedral groups, matrix groups, and finite rotation groups, culminating in the classification of the wallpaper groups.
Prerequisites: Grade of C- or better in 110.201 or 110.212
Area: Quantitative and Mathematical Sciences.

Prerequisite:Grade of C- or better in AS.110.201 or AS.110.212.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded to view any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Mathematics

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I (W) - AS.220.105

Undergraduate students May 31 - July 8 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor will schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for your important program deadlines.

A writing-intensive (W) course is one in which students complete at least 20 pages of finished writing, distributed over multiple assignments, usually 3 or 4 papers, throughout the term. For Johns Hopkins University undergraduates, Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I counts towards the 12 required credit hours of writing-intensive courses.

Duration
6 weeks
Area of Study
Humanities
Department
Writing Seminars
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-Paced
Tuesday
Self-Paced
Wednesday
Self-Paced
Thursday
Self-Paced
Friday
Self-Paced

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry II (W) - AS.220.106

Undergraduate students July 11 - August 19 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

This self-paced course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor will schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for your important program deadlines.

A writing-intensive (W) course is one in which students complete at least 20 pages of finished writing, distributed over multiple assignments, usually 3 or 4 papers, throughout the term. For Johns Hopkins University undergraduates, Introduction to Ficition & Poetry II counts towards the 12 required credit hours of writing-intensive courses.

Duration
6 weeks
Area of Study
Humanities
Department
Writing Seminars
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-Paced
Tuesday
Self-Paced
Wednesday
Self-Paced
Thursday
Self-Paced
Friday
Self-Paced

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