The 2024 Pre-College Programs are available during these two-week sessions:
• Session One (June 24-July 4)
• Session Two (July 8-July 18)
• Session Three (July 22-August 1)

Filter your search to customize your view into the catalog. Qualified pre-college students may also consider the on-campus undergraduate courses listed below.

Showing only Open Courses :: View Full Catalog

Introduction to Experimental Design in Biology - AS.020.141

Pre-College students July 8 - July 18 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

What does it mean to “design” an experiment? How do scientists go about planning experimental approaches that test specific hypotheses and provide informative results? These are the types of questions that lie at the heart of independent research. For example, scientists might ask: What analytical methods are best suited to answering a specific question? Which samples should be included in the analysis? What types of variables could influence the outcome of the experiments? This course will address such questions by having students design and carry out experiments to test specific hypotheses. Emphasis is placed on planning the experimental approaches and setting up experiments that include appropriate controls. The specific techniques used in the lab will vary but include standard techniques in molecular biology such as gel electrophoresis, PCR, and gene expression.

Duration
2 weeks
Areas of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health, STEM
Department
Biology
Instructor
Roberson, Christov

Introduction to Experimental Design in Biology - AS.020.141

Pre-College students June 24 - July 4 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

What does it mean to “design” an experiment? How do scientists go about planning experimental approaches that test specific hypotheses and provide informative results? These are the types of questions that lie at the heart of independent research. For example, scientists might ask: What analytical methods are best suited to answering a specific question? Which samples should be included in the analysis? What types of variables could influence the outcome of the experiments? This course will address such questions by having students design and carry out experiments to test specific hypotheses. Emphasis is placed on planning the experimental approaches and setting up experiments that include appropriate controls. The specific techniques used in the lab will vary but include standard techniques in molecular biology such as gel electrophoresis, PCR, and gene expression.

Duration
2 weeks
Areas of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health, STEM
Department
Biology
Instructor
Roberson, Christov

Introduction to Experimental Design in Biology - AS.020.141

Pre-College students July 22 - August 1 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

What does it mean to “design” an experiment? How do scientists go about planning experimental approaches that test specific hypotheses and provide informative results? These are the types of questions that lie at the heart of independent research. For example, scientists might ask: What analytical methods are best suited to answering a specific question? Which samples should be included in the analysis? What types of variables could influence the outcome of the experiments? This course will address such questions by having students design and carry out experiments to test specific hypotheses. Emphasis is placed on planning the experimental approaches and setting up experiments that include appropriate controls. The specific techniques used in the lab will vary but include standard techniques in molecular biology such as gel electrophoresis, PCR, and gene expression.

Duration
2 weeks
Areas of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health, STEM
Department
Biology
Instructor
Norris, Carolyn

Introduction to Laboratory Research - AS.020.120

Pre-College students June 24 - July 4 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In this program you will be introduced to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, and lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, you will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects.

Prerequisite: Background in Chemistry and Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Areas of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health, STEM
Department
Biology

Introduction to Laboratory Research - AS.020.120

Pre-College students July 22 - August 1 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In this program you will be introduced to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, and lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, you will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects.

Prerequisite: Background in Chemistry and Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Areas of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health, STEM
Department
Biology

Introduction to Laboratory Research - AS.020.120

Pre-College students July 8 - July 18 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In this program you will be introduced to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, and lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, you will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects.

Prerequisite: Background in Chemistry and Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Areas of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health, STEM
Department
Biology

Introduction to Neuroplasticity and Neurology - AS.080.119

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Recent scientific evidence shows that our brain has a great deal of malleability at any age and that our lifestyle choices play an important role in shrinking or growing different parts of our brain. Factors such as poor sleep, obesity, anxiety, and poor diet lead to accumulating shrinkage in the brain while even three months of exercise, brain training, meditation, and optimal sleep can grow the brain. You can learn to apply these new discoveries into your day-to-day life in order to improve your memory, attention, organizational skills, and overall brain vitality. Much of your learning in this course will happen during classes. Each lecture is followed by a 10-minute engaging and fun discussion session to make sure you have grasped the main concepts for that presentation.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Psychology and Brain Sciences
Department
Neuroscience
Instructor
Fotuhi, Majid

Introduction to Neuroscience - AS.080.105

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course will provide a fundamental understanding of the mammalian nervous system, with an emphasis on how molecules, cells, circuits, and systems in the brain work to promote behavior and cognition. Topics covered in this course include the function of nerve cells, signaling between brain networks, basic neuroanatomy, and the neural bases of movement, sensation, and memory. This course is designed for any student who has an interest in the range of disciplines we call neuroscience.

This course is scheduled to run Monday through Friday between 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Psychology and Brain Sciences
Department
Neuroscience
Instructor
Hendry, Stewart

Introduction to Philosophical Issues in AI (W) - AS.150.142

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Novel developments in the field of artificial intelligence have recently delivered staggering improvements nearly in any field imaginable. Machine learning models which detect and classify latent features of text, image and sound helped us read ancient scrolls we have not been able to read, improve cancer detection techniques and design better self-driving cars. Machine learning models also became better at producing new text, image and sound. ChatGPT is reaching level of competence which urges us to watermark its output and Dall-E is recreating any image to text in any style requested. The complexity of these models rivals and even surpasses their human counterparts at times. At other times, however, these models also behave shockingly incompetently. Self-driving cars struggle with unfamiliar situations, which give rise from absurd to dangerous situations. The detection models perform significantly worse on groups of individuals lying outside their training data. ChatGPT4 does not sound less confident when it makes up an answer than when it provides accurate information. These failures range from being merely amusing to threatening the very existence of humanity. With its promises of new heights and threats of new lows, machine-learning-based AI raises new and hard ethical issues. This course aims to introduce you both to the basic concepts in machine-learning-based AI as well as the hard ethical questions they raise from a philosophical perspective.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, between 12 p.m. and 2 p.m.

A writing-intensive course (W) engages students in multiple writing projects, ranging from traditional papers to a wide variety of other forms, distributed throughout the term. Assignments include a mix of high and low stakes writing, meaning that students have the chance to write in informal, low-pressure--even ungraded--contexts, as well as producing larger, more formal writing assignments. Students engage in writing in the classroom through variety of means, including class discussions, workshop, faculty/TA lectures, and class materials (for instance, strong and weak examples of the assigned genre). Expectations are clearly conveyed through assignment descriptions, including the genre and audience of the assigned writing, and evaluative criteria. Students receive feedback on their writing, in written and/or verbal form, from faculty, TAs, and/or peers. Students have at least one opportunity to revise.

Duration
5 weeks
Areas of Study
STEM, Humanities
Department
Philosophy
Instructor
Gungor, Huseyin

Introduction to Surgery - AS.020.134

Pre-College students July 8 - July 18 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Gain a broad understanding of surgery, including historical milestones in the field, surgical anatomy, pre- and post- operative patient care, subspecialties within the field, and surgical technology. Complete daily modules, including lecture content and activities which provide opportunities to apply your understanding of course materials. This program is designed to engage your interest in a diverse set of medical careers ranging from surgery and nursing to biomedical engineering.

Prerequisite: Background in Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are two required textbooks for this program. Details about the materials you need are available within your course syllabus and the Summer at Hopkins organization Canvas site.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health
Department
Biology

Introduction to Surgery - AS.020.134

Pre-College students July 22 - August 1 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Gain a broad understanding of surgery, including historical milestones in the field, surgical anatomy, pre- and post- operative patient care, subspecialties within the field, and surgical technology. Complete daily modules, including lecture content and activities which provide opportunities to apply your understanding of course materials. This program is designed to engage your interest in a diverse set of medical careers ranging from surgery and nursing to biomedical engineering.

Prerequisite: Background in Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are two required textbooks for this program. Details about the materials you need are available within your course syllabus and the Summer at Hopkins organization Canvas site.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health
Department
Biology

Introduction to Surgery - AS.020.134

Pre-College students June 24 - July 4 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Gain a broad understanding of surgery, including historical milestones in the field, surgical anatomy, pre- and post- operative patient care, subspecialties within the field, and surgical technology. Complete daily modules, including lecture content and activities which provide opportunities to apply your understanding of course materials. This program is designed to engage your interest in a diverse set of medical careers ranging from surgery and nursing to biomedical engineering.

Prerequisite: Background in Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are two required textbooks for this program. Details about the materials you need are available within your course syllabus and the Summer at Hopkins organization Canvas site.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health
Department
Biology

Introduction to Visual Communication- Graphic Design - AS.371.153

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

The digital design course explores two-dimensional graphics as visual communication. Students will be introduced to basic design principles and elements, learn graphics tools used in the design industry, and develop and apply creative strategies to solve design problems in their everyday lives. This unique course will address the students’ direct needs through real-life design problems they face. Students will be asked to bring design challenges and tackle the issue both independently and collaboratively. Design challenges may include building print and web visual presentations, producing information brochure and posters, developing off and online portfolios, creating a resume to business cards. The course will offer both analog and digital design processes, graphics software tutorials and techniques, and basic introduction to design history, vocabulary and concepts. Attendance in first class is mandatory.

This course is scheduled to run Tuesday and Wednesday between 10 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Humanities
Department
Art
Instructor
Hwang, Tae

Introduction to Watercolor - AS.371.154

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Watercolor is simultaneously the most accessible of all painting media and the most misunderstood. This course provides experience and instruction in observational and expressive watercolor techniques, materials, concepts, and vocabulary. Topics to be reviewed include line, perspective, value, texture,composition, color, and pictorial space. There will be an introduction to contemporary practices in watercolor, as well as experimental and abstract exercises, collage, and conceptual work.

This course is scheduled to run Tuesday and Wednesday between 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Humanities
Department
Art
Instructor
Murphy, Margaret

Introductory Chemistry I - AS.030.101

Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

The fundamental principles of chemistry, including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, elementary thermodynamics, equilibrium and acids and bases, are introduced in this course. Can be taken with Introductory Chemistry Laboratory – I unless lab has been previously completed. Note: Students taking this course and Laboratory 030.105 may not take any other courses in the summer sessions at the same time and should devote their full time to these subjects. High school physics and calculus are strongly recommended as prerequisites. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. Students not enrolled in college (unless they are rising freshmen) may not take this course.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday between 9:30 a.m. and 12 p.m.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Chemistry
Instructor
Thyagarajan, Sunita

Introductory Chemistry II - AS.030.102

Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Continuation of AS.030.101 emphasizing chemical kinetics, chemical bonding. Topics: energy levels and wave functions for particle-in-a-box and hydrogen atom and approximate wave functions for molecules including introduction to hybrid orbitals. Note: Students taking this course and Laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions at the same time and should devote their full time to these subjects. High school physics and calculus are strongly recommended as prerequisites. First and second terms must be taken in sequence.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday between 9 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.

Prerequisite: AS.030.101 (Introductory Chemistry I). Students enrolled in AS.030.103 (Applied Chemical Equilibrium and Reactivity with Lab) may not enroll in or receive credit for AS.030.102.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Chemistry
Instructor
Young, Jamie

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I - AS.030.105

Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Laboratory work includes quantitative analysis and the measurement of physical properties. Open only to those who are registered for or have successfully completed Introductory Chemistry 030.101.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m.

Prerequisites: Students must have completed or be enrolled in AS.030.101 (Introductory Chemistry I) or EN.510.101 (Introduction to Materials Chemistry) in order to register for AS.030.105. Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class. To access the tutorial, login to myLearning and enter 458083 in the Search box to locate the appropriate module.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Chemistry
Instructor
Thyagarajan, Sunita

Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II - AS.030.106

Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Laboratory work includes some quantitative analysis and the measurement of physical properties. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Chemistry II (AS.030.102). Permission required for pre-college students.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m.

Prerequisites: AS.030.105 (Introductory Chemistry Laboratory I) and AS.030.101 (Introductory Chemistry I) OR EN.510.101 (Introduction to Materials Chemistry). Students enrolled in AS.030.103 (Applied Chemical Equilibrium and Reactivity w/Lab) may not enroll in or receive credit for AS.030.106. Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class. To access the tutorial, login to myLearning and enter 458083 in the Search box to locate the appropriate module.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Chemistry
Instructor
Young, Jamie

Introductory Organic Chemistry I - AS.030.205

Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental chemistry of carbon compounds. Topics include interrelationships of structure, physical properties, synthesis, and reactions and their mechanisms as well as a brief overview of bio-organic chemistry. Note: Students taking this course and the laboratory 030.105-106 may not take any other course in the summer sessions and should devote full time to these subjects. First and second terms must be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: Introductory Chemistry or the equivalent.

This course is scheduled to run Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.

Prerequisite: AS.030.102 (Introductory Chemistry II) or AS.030.103 (Applied Equilibrium and Reactivity w/Lab) or EN.510.101 (Introduction to Materials Chemistry) or AS.030.204 (Chemical Structure and Bonding w/Lab).

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Chemistry
Instructor
Hill, Eric

Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory - AS.030.225

Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Laboratory work includes fundamental laboratory techniques and preparation of representative organic compounds. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Organic Chemistry. Note: This one-semester course is offered each term. Introductory Organic Chemistry I/II requires one semester of the laboratory.

This course is scheduled to run Monday through Friday between 12 p.m. and 4 p.m.

Prerequisites: AS.030.205 (Introductory Organic Chemistry I), which can be taken concurrently with AS.305.225( Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory); AND AS.030.102 (Introductory Chemistry II) AND AS.030.106 (Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II) OR AS.030.103 (Applied Equilibrium and Relativity w/Lab). Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class. To access the tutorial, login to myLearning and enter 458083 in the Search box to locate the appropriate module.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Chemistry
Instructor
Lectka, Thomas

Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory - AS.030.225

Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Laboratory work includes fundamental laboratory techniques and preparation of representative organic compounds. Open only to those who are registered for or have completed Introductory Organic Chemistry. Note: This one-semester course is offered each term. Introductory Organic Chemistry I/II requires one semester of the laboratory.

This course is scheduled to run Monday through Friday between 12 p.m. and 4 p.m.

Prerequisites: AS.030.205 (Introductory Organic Chemistry I), which can be taken concurrently with AS.305.225( Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory); AND AS.030.102 (Introductory Chemistry II) AND AS.030.106 (Introductory Chemistry Laboratory II) OR AS.030.103 (Applied Equilibrium and Relativity w/Lab). Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class. To access the tutorial, login to myLearning and enter 458083 in the Search box to locate the appropriate module.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Chemistry
Instructor
Lectka, Thomas

Linear Algebra - AS.110.201

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Vector spaces, matrices, and linear transformations. Solutions of systems of linear equations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and diagonalization of matrices. Applications to differential equations.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, between 9 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in AS.110.107 (Calculus II For Biological and Social Science) or AS.110.109 (Calculus II For Physical Sciences and Engineering) or AS.110.113 (Honors Single Variable Calculus) or AS.110.202 (Calculus II) or AS.110.302 (Differential Equations and Applications), or a 5 on the AP BC exam.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Cutrone, Joseph

Linear Algebra and Differential Equations - EN.553.291

Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An introduction to the basic concepts of linear algebra, matrix theory, and differential equations that are used widely in modern engineering and science. Intended for engineering and science majors whose program does not permit taking both AS.110.201 and AS.110.302.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, between 10 a.m. and 12:45 p.m.

Prerequisite: AS.110.107 (Calculus II For Biological and Social Science) or AS.110.109 (Calculus II: For Physical Sciences and Engineering) or AS.110.113 (Honors Single Variable Calculus).

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
EN Applied Mathematics & Statistics
Instructor
Nakade, Apurva

Mathematical Foundations for Computer Science - EN.601.230

Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course provides an introduction to mathematical reasoning and discrete structures relevant to computer science. Topics include propositional and predicate logic, proof techniques including mathematical induction, sets, relations, functions, recurrences, counting techniques, simple computational models, asymptotic analysis, discrete probability, graphs, trees, and number theory.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday between 9 a.m. and 11:45 a.m.

Students may not enroll if they have taken EN.601.231 (Automata and Computation Theory).

Prerequisite: EN.500.112 (Gateway Computing: Java) OR EN.500.113 (Gateway Computing: Python) OR EN.500.114 (Gateway Computing: Matlab) OR EN.500.132 (Bootcamp: Java) OR EN.500.133 (Bootcamp: Python) OR EN.500.134 (Bootcamp: Matlab) OR EN.601.220 (Intermediate Programming).

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
EN Computer Science
Instructor
More, Sara

Mathematics for Sustainability - AS.110.126

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Mathematics for Sustainability covers topics in measurement, probability, statistics, dynamics, and data analysis. In this course, students will analyze, visually represent, and interpret large, real data sets from a variety of government, corporate, and non-profit sources. Through local and global case studies, students will engage in the mathematics behind environmental sustainability issues and the debates centered on them. Topics include climate change, natural resource use, waste production, air and water pollution, water scarcity, and decreasing biodiversity. The software package R is used throughout the course.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, between 9 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.

Prerequisites: Comfort with algebraic expressions and functions. No prior experience in coding is required.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Pezzi, Daniel

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