The 2024 Pre-College Programs are available during these two-week sessions:
• Session One (June 24-July 4)
• Session Two (July 8-July 18)
• Session Three (July 22-August 1)

Filter your search to customize your view into the catalog. Qualified pre-college students may also consider the on-campus undergraduate courses listed below.

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Medical School Intensive - AS.020.132

Pre-College students June 24 - July 4 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Learn the basic knowledge and techniques related to surgery, internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine, and biomedical science by participating in interactive lectures and labs. You and your fellow high-school students will explore new aspects of this critical field at one of the nation’s leading institutions as you are taught and guided by experts in the field of medicine.

Prerequisite: Background in Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and video resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health
Department
Biology

Medical School Intensive - AS.020.132

Pre-College students July 8 - July 18 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Learn the basic knowledge and techniques related to surgery, internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine, and biomedical science by participating in interactive lectures and labs. You and your fellow high-school students will explore new aspects of this critical field at one of the nation’s leading institutions as you are taught and guided by experts in the field of medicine.

Prerequisite: Background in Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and video resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health
Department
Biology

Medical School Intensive - AS.020.132

Pre-College students July 22 - August 1 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Learn the basic knowledge and techniques related to surgery, internal medicine, pediatrics, emergency medicine, and biomedical science by participating in interactive lectures and labs. You and your fellow high-school students will explore new aspects of this critical field at one of the nation’s leading institutions as you are taught and guided by experts in the field of medicine.

Prerequisite: Background in Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and video resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health
Department
Biology

Minds and Machines - AS.140.316

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Is the mind identical to the brain? Is the mind (or brain) a computer? Could a computer reason, have emotions, or be morally responsible? This course examines such questions philosophically and historically. Topics include the history of AI research from 1940s to present; debates in cognitive science related to AI (computationalism, connectionism, and 4E cognition); and AI ethics.

This course is scheduled to run Tuesday and Thursday between 1 p.m. and 4:45 p.m.

Duration
5 weeks
Areas of Study
STEM, Psychology and Brain Sciences, Humanities
Department
History of Science and Technology
Instructor
Honenberger, Phillip

Neuroaesthetics: How the Arts and Aesthetic Experiences Advance Health, Wellbeing, and Learning - AS.080.309

Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course will provide an overview of neuroaesthetics: the study of how the arts and aesthetic experiences measurably change the body, brain, and behavior and how this knowledge is translated into specific practices that advance health and wellbeing. The course will provide students with the foundations and theories of neuroaesthetics including the history of neuroaesthetics, the basic neurobiology of the senses, neuroanatomy and mechanisms of brain structure involved in the arts and aesthetics. The course will also take a deep dive into the book, Your Brain on Art, highlighting interactive case studies, immersive creative activities, and discussions with experts from the field.

This course is scheduled to run Tuesday and Thursday between 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.

Prequisite: AS.080.306 (Nueroscience: Cellular & Systems II) OR AS.200.141 (Foundations of Brain, Behavior and Cognition).

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Psychology and Brain Sciences
Department
Neuroscience
Instructor
Magsamen, Susan

Organic Chemistry II - AS.030.206

Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Continuation of AS.030.205 Organic Chemistry I with special emphasis on organic synthesis and related synthetic methods. Students may not simultaneously enroll for AS.030.212 and AS.030.206.

This course is scheduled to run Monday through Friday between 9 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.

Prerequisite: AS.030.205 (Introductory Organic Chemistry I).

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Chemistry
Instructor
Hill, Eric

Precalculus - AS.110.105

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course provides students with the background necessary for the study of calculus. It begins with a review of the coordinate plane, linear equations, and inequalities, and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students will explore the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and will be introduced to complex numbers, parametric equations, and the difference quotient.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, between 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Kumar, Aditya

Probability - EN.553.420

Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Probability and its applications, at the calculus level. Emphasis on techniques of application and on rigorous mathematical demonstration. Probability, combinatorial probability, random variables, distribution functions, important probability distributions, independence, conditional probability, moments, covariance and correlation, limit theorems. Students initiating graduate work in probability or statistics should enroll in EN.553.620 or EN.553.720. Prerequisites: one year of calculus. Corequisites: multivariable calculus and linear algebra.

Students who have received credit for AS.110.106 and/or AS.110.107 taken prior to Fall 2020 should contact the course instructor to determine whether they can receive permission to register for this course.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, between 10 a.m. and 12:45 p.m.

Prerequisites: AS.110.107 (Calculus II For Biological and Social Science) or AS.110.109 (Calculus II For Physical Sciences & Engineering) or AS.110.113 (Honors Single Variable Calculus). AS.110.201 (Linear Algebra) or AS.110.202 (Calculus III) or AS.110.211 (Honors Multivariable Calculus) OR AS.110.212 (Honors Linear Algebra) must also be taken prior to EN.553.310 or concurrently.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
EN Applied Mathematics & Statistics
Instructor
Torcaso, Fred

Probability and Statistics for the Life Sciences - EN.553.211

Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This is an introduction to statistics aimed at students in the life sciences. The course will provide the necessary background in probability with treatment of independence, Bayes theorem, discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions. The statistical topics covered will include sampling and sampling distributions, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for means, comparison of populations, analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation. Analysis of data will be done using Excel.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, between 10 a.m. and 12:45 p.m.

Prerequisite: AS.110.106 (Calculus I For Biology and Social Sciences) or AS.110.108 (Calculus I For Physical Sciences and Engineering) or AS.110.113 (Single Multivariable Calculus).

Statistics Sequence restriction: Students who have completed any of these courses may not register: EN.550.230 (Introduction to Biostatistics) OR AS.280.345 (Public Health Biostatistics) OR AS.200.314 (Advanced Statistical Methods) OR EN.550.310 (Probability & Statistics) OR EN.550.311 (Probability and Statistics for the Biological Sciences and Engineering) OR EN.550.420 (Introduction to Probability) OR EN.550.430 (Introduction to Statistics) OR EN.560.348 (Probability & Statistics in Civil Engineering).

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
EN Applied Mathematics & Statistics
Instructor
Pisano, Zachary

Projects in ChemE Unit Operations with Experiments (W) - EN.540.311

Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course challenges students with laboratory projects that are not well-defined. Students work in groups to develop an effective approach to experiments. They identify the important operating variables, decide how best to obtain them using measured or calculated values. Based on their results they predict, carryout, analyze and improve experiments. Each student analyzes three of the following projects: distillation, gas absorption, and one of the projects in EN.540.313. In addition to technical objectives, this course stresses oral and written communication. Students will have additional meeting times with the instructors and outside of class.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between 12 p.m. and 5 p.m.

A writing-intensive course (W) engages students in multiple writing projects, ranging from traditional papers to a wide variety of other forms, distributed throughout the term. Assignments include a mix of high and low stakes writing, meaning that students have the chance to write in informal, low-pressure--even ungraded--contexts, as well as producing larger, more formal writing assignments. Students engage in writing in the classroom through variety of means, including class discussions, workshop, faculty/TA lectures, and class materials (for instance, strong and weak examples of the assigned genre). Expectations are clearly conveyed through assignment descriptions, including the genre and audience of the assigned writing, and evaluative criteria. Students receive feedback on their writing, in written and/or verbal form, from faculty, TAs, and/or peers. Students have at least one opportunity to revise.

Prerequisites: EN.540.301 (Kinetic Process) and EN.540.304 (Transport Phenomena II) and EN.540.306 (Chemical & Molecular Bioseparations) and EN.661.315 (Cutlure of the Engineering Profession). EN.540.490 (Introduction to Chemical Process Safety can be taken concurrently with EN.540.311 (Projects in ChemE Unit Operations with Experiments). Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class. To access the tutorial, login to myLearning and enter 458083 in the Search box to locate the appropriate module.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
EN Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
Instructor
Husmann, Eric

Social Inequality and the Public's Health - AS.280.140

Pre-College students June 24 - July 4 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In epidemiology, public health scientists use quantitative and analytic tools examine to the distribution of disease across the population and to identify the various factors that shape these patterns. This course will explore how epidemiologic tools can be used to interrogate the social and structural factors that create health disparities in society. Students will learn about key social determinants of health (including class, race, and gender), the various pathways by which social experiences “get under the skin” to impact physiologic disease states, and how epidemiologists investigate these processes through population-based research. Students will leave the course with an understanding of the ways public health professionals and community members alike can use this public health research to develop policies and programs that protect the health of vulnerable groups and reduce inequality.

Duration
2 weeks
Areas of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health, STEM
Department
Public Health Studies
Instructor
Qureshi, Farah

Social Inequality and the Public's Health - AS.280.140

Pre-College students July 8 - July 18 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In epidemiology, public health scientists use quantitative and analytic tools examine to the distribution of disease across the population and to identify the various factors that shape these patterns. This course will explore how epidemiologic tools can be used to interrogate the social and structural factors that create health disparities in society. Students will learn about key social determinants of health (including class, race, and gender), the various pathways by which social experiences “get under the skin” to impact physiologic disease states, and how epidemiologists investigate these processes through population-based research. Students will leave the course with an understanding of the ways public health professionals and community members alike can use this public health research to develop policies and programs that protect the health of vulnerable groups and reduce inequality.

Duration
2 weeks
Areas of Study
Foundations of Medicine and Health, STEM
Department
Public Health Studies
Instructor
Qureshi, Farah

Stars and the Universe: Cosmic Evolution - AS.171.118

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course looks at the evolution of the universe from its origin in a cosmic explosion to emergence of life on Earth and possibly other planets throughout the universe. Topics include big-bang cosmology; origin and evolution of galaxies, stars, planets, life, and intelligence; black holes; quasars; and relativity theory. The material is largely descriptive, based on insights from physics, astronomy, geology, chemistry, biology, and anthropology.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between 9 a.m. and 12 p.m.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
STEM
Department
Physics & Astronomy
Instructor
Zheng, Wei

Thriving Through College: A Developmental and Psychological Perspective - AS.200.210

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Students will develop a working knowledge of the characteristics that have been identified through research as being important in effective college transitions. Using practical and theoretical objectives, the course will explore the relevance of developmental and positive psychological processes as they apply in academic and social settings and provide theory-based research approaches for thriving in college and beyond. The developmental period of emerging adulthood (ages 18-25) will be discussed with a primary focus on cognitive, moral, and identity development theories. Students also will gain an understanding of what contributes to thriving and how to build the enabling conditions of a life worth living. The developmental theories and central concepts in positive psychology will provide students with a foundation to navigate college academic expectations and equip them with the attitudes, skills, and resources needed to function optimally and excel in college.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Wednesday, and Friday between 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Psychology and Brain Sciences
Department
Psychological & Brain Sciences
Instructor
Bauman, Leslie

Understanding the Food System - AS.190.223

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course examines the politics and policies that shape the production and consumption of food. Topics include food security, obesity, crop and animal production, and the impacts of agriculture on climate change. We will also consider the vulnerabilities of our food system to challenges such as the Covid-19 pandemic, as well as efforts to transform food and agriculture through new food technologies and grass-roots movements to create a more democratic food system.

This course is scheduled to run Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday between 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.

Students who have completed AS.190.405 (Food Politics) may not enroll in this class.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Social Sciences
Department
Political Science
Instructor
Sheingate, Adam

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