The 2024 Pre-College Programs are available during these two-week sessions:
• Session One (June 24-July 4)
• Session Two (July 8-July 18)
• Session Three (July 22-August 1)

Filter your search to customize your view into the catalog. Qualified pre-college students may also consider the on-campus undergraduate courses listed below.

Showing only Open Courses :: View Full Catalog
Results for: Pre-College students, STEM

Anatomy, Physiology, & Disease: Core Systems - AS.020.131

Pre-College students June 24 - July 4 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An understanding of physiology is an invaluable part of any budding physician’s or scientist’s repertoire. This course introduces classical physiology in the human body, and how it functions in both health and disease. This, the first of a two-part course (Anatomy, Physiology & Disease: Guts, Hormones and Reproduction is optional but should be a consideration), will cover core topics including the nervous, muscular, and cardiopulmonary systems, and physiology and disease. Additionally, students will be working outside the classroom to consolidate and reinforce their new understanding of the subject. Ultimately, knowledge of basic physiology should impact future research and serve as a foundation for all future scientific and biomedical endeavors.

Prerequisite: Background in Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There is a required textbook. Details about the materials you need are available within your course syllabus and the Summer at Hopkins organization Canvas site.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Anatomy, Physiology, & Disease: Core Systems - AS.020.131

Pre-College students July 22 - August 1 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An understanding of physiology is an invaluable part of any budding physician’s or scientist’s repertoire. This course introduces classical physiology in the human body, and how it functions in both health and disease. This, the first of a two-part course (Anatomy, Physiology & Disease: Guts, Hormones and Reproduction is optional but should be a consideration), will cover core topics including the nervous, muscular, and cardiopulmonary systems, and physiology and disease. Additionally, students will be working outside the classroom to consolidate and reinforce their new understanding of the subject. Ultimately, knowledge of basic physiology should impact future research and serve as a foundation for all future scientific and biomedical endeavors.

Prerequisite: Background in Biology is strongly recommended
.
Required Text: There is a required textbook. Details about the materials you need are available within your course syllabus and the Summer at Hopkins organization Canvas site.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Anatomy, Physiology, & Disease: Guts, Hormones & Reproduction - AS.020.131

Pre-College students July 8 - July 18 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An understanding of physiology is an invaluable part of any budding physician’s or scientist’s repertoire. In this, the second of a two-part course introducing classical physiology in the human body, and how it functions in both health and disease, we will cover guts (renal, digestive, and immune systems), as well as hormones (basic endocrinology) and sex/reproductive physiology. In addition to classroom study, students will be challenged to synthesize their newfound knowledge by taking part in immersive afternoon activities. While this represents a wholly separate course that may be taken independently, students should also consider taking the first part of this series (Anatomy, Physiology, & Disease: Core Systems) to bolster their understanding (offered in Summer Sessions 1 and 3). Ultimately, knowledge of basic physiological processes should impact the student's future research and serve as a foundation for all future scientific and biomedical endeavors.

Prerequisite: Background in Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There is a required textbook. Details about the materials you need are available within your course syllabus and the Summer at Hopkins organization Canvas site.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Calculus I (Physical Sciences & Engineering) - AS.110.108

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Differential and integral calculus. Includes analytic geometry, functions, limits, integrals and derivatives, polar coordinates, parametric equations, Taylor's theorem and applications, infinite sequences and series. Some applications to the physical sciences and engineering will be discussed, and the courses are designed to meet the needs of students in these disciplines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Huang, Fan
Class Schedule
Monday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Tuesday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Wednesday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Thursday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM

Calculus III - AS.110.202

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Calculus of Several Variables. Calculus of functions of more than one variable: partial derivatives, and applications; multiple integrals, line and surface integrals; Green's Theorem, Stokes' Theorem, and Gauss' Divergence Theorem.

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in AS.110.107 (Calculus II For Biological and Social Science) or AS.110.109 (Calculus II For Physical Sciences and Engineering) or AS.110.113 (Honors Single Variable Calculus) or AS.110.201 (Linear Algebra) or AS.110.212 (Honors Linear Algebra) or AS.110.302 (Differential Equations and Applications), or a 5 on the AP BC exam.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Shumakovitch, Alexander
Class Schedule
Monday
1:00 PM-3:30 PM
Tuesday
1:00 PM-3:30 PM
Wednesday
1:00 PM-3:30 PM
Thursday
1:00 PM-3:30 PM

Exploring the Universe with Space Telescopes - AS.171.135

Pre-College students June 24 - July 4 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Through a mix of lectures and hands-on activities, you will learn how astronomers study objects in space using different types of light, observatories, and instrumental techniques. You will also hear from active researchers about the big, open questions in astronomy and how we use space telescopes such as Hubble and Webb to answer those questions. Building on this knowledge, you will work with a small group to design your own space telescope and present that design to your peers. No prior knowledge of astronomy, physics, or mathematics is assumed.

Students in this course must bring a laptop or device capable of opening PDFs and running Google docs for project and group work.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Physics & Astronomy
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Exploring the Universe with Space Telescopes - AS.171.135

Pre-College students July 8 - July 18 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Through a mix of lectures and hands-on activities, you will learn how astronomers study objects in space using different types of light, observatories, and instrumental techniques. You will also hear from active researchers about the big, open questions in astronomy and how we use space telescopes such as Hubble and Webb to answer those questions. Building on this knowledge, you will work with a small group to design your own space telescope and present that design to your peers. No prior knowledge of astronomy, physics, or mathematics is assumed.

Students in this course must bring a laptop or device capable of opening PDFs and running Google docs for project and group work.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Physics & Astronomy
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Exploring the Universe with Space Telescopes - AS.171.135

Pre-College students July 22 - August 1 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Through a mix of lectures and hands-on activities, you will learn how astronomers study objects in space using different types of light, observatories, and instrumental techniques. You will also hear from active researchers about the big, open questions in astronomy and how we use space telescopes such as Hubble and Webb to answer those questions. Building on this knowledge, you will work with a small group to design your own space telescope and present that design to your peers. No prior knowledge of astronomy, physics, or mathematics is assumed.

Students in this course must bring a laptop or device capable of opening PDFs and running Google docs for project and group work.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Physics & Astronomy
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Foundational Mathematics of Artificial Intelligence - AS.110.110

Pre-College students June 24 - July 4 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

As artificial intelligence models like ChatGPT become increasingly capable and part of our everyday life, the need to understand their inner workings intensifies. This course introduces the mathematical and statistical principles behind machine learning and AI technologies. Students will assimilate basic concepts including math models and performance measurement. They will apply software to build machine learning applications that serve as AI building blocks including linear regression, classification trees, neural networks, and reinforcement learning. Participants will be challenged to assess the quality of their analyses to better understand the opportunities for, and the limitations of AI.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Tuesday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Wednesday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Thursday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Friday
9:30AM-4:00PM

Foundational Mathematics of Artificial Intelligence - AS.110.110

Pre-College students July 8 - July 18 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

As artificial intelligence models like ChatGPT become increasingly capable and part of our everyday life, the need to understand their inner workings intensifies. This course introduces the mathematical and statistical principles behind machine learning and AI technologies. Students will assimilate basic concepts including math models and performance measurement. They will apply software to build machine learning applications that serve as AI building blocks including linear regression, classification trees, neural networks, and reinforcement learning. Participants will be challenged to assess the quality of their analyses to better understand the opportunities for, and the limitations of AI.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Tuesday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Wednesday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Thursday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Friday
9:30AM-4:00PM

Foundational Mathematics of Artificial Intelligence - AS.110.110

Pre-College students July 22 - August 1 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

As artificial intelligence models like ChatGPT become increasingly capable and part of our everyday life, the need to understand their inner workings intensifies. This course introduces the mathematical and statistical principles behind machine learning and AI technologies. Students will assimilate basic concepts including math models and performance measurement. They will apply software to build machine learning applications that serve as AI building blocks including linear regression, classification trees, neural networks, and reinforcement learning. Participants will be challenged to assess the quality of their analyses to better understand the opportunities for, and the limitations of AI.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Tuesday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Wednesday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Thursday
9:30AM-4:00PM
Friday
9:30AM-4:00PM

Gateway Computing: JAVA - EN.500.112

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course introduces fundamental programming concepts and techniques, and is intended for all who plan to develop computational artifacts or intelligently deploy computational tools in their studies and careers. Topics covered include the design and implementation of algorithms using variables, control structures, arrays, functions, files, testing, debugging, and structured program design. Elements of object-oriented programming. algorithmic efficiency and data visualization are also introduced. Students deploy programming to develop working solutions that address problems in engineering, science and other areas of contemporary interest that vary from section to section. Course homework involves significant programming. Attendance and participation in class sessions are expected.

Prerequisite: Students may not have earned credit in the following courses: EN.500.113 (Gateway Computing: Python), EN.500.114 (Gateway Computing: Matlab), EN.500.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers), EN.500.132 (Bootcamp: JAVA), EN.500.133 (Bootcamp: Python), or EN.500.134 (Bootcamp: Matlab).

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
EN General Engineering
Instructor
Sekyonda, Ivan
Class Schedule
Monday
9:00 AM-12:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM-12:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM-12:00 PM

Gateway Computing: Python - EN.500.113

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course introduces fundamental programming concepts and techniques, and is intended for all who plan to develop computational artifacts or intelligently deploy computational tools in their studies and careers. Topics covered include the design and implementation of algorithms using variables, control structures, arrays, functions, files, testing, debugging, and structured program design. Elements of object-oriented programming. algorithmic efficiency and data visualization are also introduced. Students deploy programming to develop working solutions that address problems in engineering, science and other areas of contemporary interest that vary from section to section. Course homework involves significant programming. Attendance and participation in class sessions are expected.

Prerequisite: Students may not have earned credit in the following courses: EN.500.112 (Gateway Computing: JAVA), EN.500.114 (Gateway Computing: Matlab), EN.500.202 (Computation and Programming for Materials Scientists and Engineers), EN.500.132 (Bootcamp: JAVA), EN.500.132 (Bootcamp: JAVA), or EN.500.134 (Bootcamp: Matlab).

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
EN General Engineering
Instructor
Kutten, Kwame
Class Schedule
Monday
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
Wednesday
12:00 PM-3:00 PM
Friday
12:00 PM-3:00 PM

Introduction to Experimental Design in Biology - AS.020.141

Pre-College students June 24 - July 4 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

What does it mean to “design” an experiment? How do scientists go about planning experimental approaches that test specific hypotheses and provide informative results? These are the types of questions that lie at the heart of independent research. For example, scientists might ask: What analytical methods are best suited to answering a specific question? Which samples should be included in the analysis? What types of variables could influence the outcome of the experiments? This course will address such questions by having students design and carry out experiments to test specific hypotheses. Emphasis is placed on planning the experimental approaches and setting up experiments that include appropriate controls. The specific techniques used in the lab will vary but include standard techniques in molecular biology such as gel electrophoresis, PCR, and gene expression.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology
Instructor
Roberson, Christov
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Introduction to Experimental Design in Biology - AS.020.141

Pre-College students July 8 - July 18 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

What does it mean to “design” an experiment? How do scientists go about planning experimental approaches that test specific hypotheses and provide informative results? These are the types of questions that lie at the heart of independent research. For example, scientists might ask: What analytical methods are best suited to answering a specific question? Which samples should be included in the analysis? What types of variables could influence the outcome of the experiments? This course will address such questions by having students design and carry out experiments to test specific hypotheses. Emphasis is placed on planning the experimental approaches and setting up experiments that include appropriate controls. The specific techniques used in the lab will vary but include standard techniques in molecular biology such as gel electrophoresis, PCR, and gene expression.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology
Instructor
Roberson, Christov
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Introduction to Experimental Design in Biology - AS.020.141

Pre-College students July 22 - August 1 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

What does it mean to “design” an experiment? How do scientists go about planning experimental approaches that test specific hypotheses and provide informative results? These are the types of questions that lie at the heart of independent research. For example, scientists might ask: What analytical methods are best suited to answering a specific question? Which samples should be included in the analysis? What types of variables could influence the outcome of the experiments? This course will address such questions by having students design and carry out experiments to test specific hypotheses. Emphasis is placed on planning the experimental approaches and setting up experiments that include appropriate controls. The specific techniques used in the lab will vary but include standard techniques in molecular biology such as gel electrophoresis, PCR, and gene expression.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology
Instructor
Norris, Carolyn
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Introduction to Laboratory Research - AS.020.120

Pre-College students June 24 - July 4 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In this program you will be introduced to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, and lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, you will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects.

Prerequisite: Background in Chemistry and Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Introduction to Laboratory Research - AS.020.120

Pre-College students July 8 - July 18 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In this program you will be introduced to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, and lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, you will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects.

Prerequisite: Background in Chemistry and Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Introduction to Laboratory Research - AS.020.120

Pre-College students July 22 - August 1 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In this program you will be introduced to a variety of biochemical and molecular biological laboratory techniques. These will include DNA analysis by restriction enzyme mapping, amplification of DNA segments by PCR, and lipid analysis by chromatography. Additionally, you will visit a variety of biological laboratories to observe actual research projects.

Prerequisite: Background in Chemistry and Biology is strongly recommended.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

Introduction to Philosophical Issues in AI (W) - AS.150.142

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Novel developments in the field of artificial intelligence have recently delivered staggering improvements nearly in any field imaginable. Machine learning models which detect and classify latent features of text, image and sound helped us read ancient scrolls we have not been able to read, improve cancer detection techniques and design better self-driving cars. Machine learning models also became better at producing new text, image and sound. ChatGPT is reaching level of competence which urges us to watermark its output and Dall-E is recreating any image to text in any style requested. The complexity of these models rivals and even surpasses their human counterparts at times. At other times, however, these models also behave shockingly incompetently. Self-driving cars struggle with unfamiliar situations, which give rise from absurd to dangerous situations. The detection models perform significantly worse on groups of individuals lying outside their training data. ChatGPT4 does not sound less confident when it makes up an answer than when it provides accurate information. These failures range from being merely amusing to threatening the very existence of humanity. With its promises of new heights and threats of new lows, machine-learning-based AI raises new and hard ethical issues. This course aims to introduce you both to the basic concepts in machine-learning-based AI as well as the hard ethical questions they raise from a philosophical perspective.

A writing-intensive course (W) engages students in multiple writing projects, ranging from traditional papers to a wide variety of other forms, distributed throughout the term. Assignments include a mix of high and low stakes writing, meaning that students have the chance to write in informal, low-pressure--even ungraded--contexts, as well as producing larger, more formal writing assignments. Students engage in writing in the classroom through variety of means, including class discussions, workshop, faculty/TA lectures, and class materials (for instance, strong and weak examples of the assigned genre). Expectations are clearly conveyed through assignment descriptions, including the genre and audience of the assigned writing, and evaluative criteria. Students receive feedback on their writing, in written and/or verbal form, from faculty, TAs, and/or peers. Students have at least one opportunity to revise.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Philosophy
Instructor
Gungor, Huseyin
Class Schedule
Monday
12:00 PM-2:00 PM
Tuesday
12:00 PM-2:00 PM
Wednesday
12:00 PM-2:00 PM
Thursday
12:00 PM-2:00 PM

Linear Algebra - AS.110.201

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Vector spaces, matrices, and linear transformations. Solutions of systems of linear equations. Eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and diagonalization of matrices. Applications to differential equations.

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in AS.110.107 (Calculus II For Biological and Social Science) or AS.110.109 (Calculus II For Physical Sciences and Engineering) or AS.110.113 (Honors Single Variable Calculus) or AS.110.202 (Calculus II) or AS.110.302 (Differential Equations and Applications), or a 5 on the AP BC exam.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Cutrone, Joseph
Class Schedule
Monday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Tuesday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Wednesday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Thursday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM

Mathematics for Sustainability - AS.110.126

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Mathematics for Sustainability covers topics in measurement, probability, statistics, dynamics, and data analysis. In this course, students will analyze, visually represent, and interpret large, real data sets from a variety of government, corporate, and non-profit sources. Through local and global case studies, students will engage in the mathematics behind environmental sustainability issues and the debates centered on them. Topics include climate change, natural resource use, waste production, air and water pollution, water scarcity, and decreasing biodiversity. The software package R is used throughout the course.

Prerequisites: Comfort with algebraic expressions and functions. No prior experience in coding is required.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Pezzi, Daniel
Class Schedule
Monday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Tuesday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Wednesday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM
Thursday
9:00 AM-11:30 AM

Minds and Machines - AS.140.316

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Is the mind identical to the brain? Is the mind (or brain) a computer? Could a computer reason, have emotions, or be morally responsible? This course examines such questions philosophically and historically. Topics include the history of AI research from 1940s to present; debates in cognitive science related to AI (computationalism, connectionism, and 4E cognition); and AI ethics.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
History of Science and Technology
Instructor
Honenberger, Phillip
Class Schedule
Tuesday
1:00PM-4:45PM
Thursday
1:00PM-4:45PM

Precalculus - AS.110.105

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Homewood Campus
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course provides students with the background necessary for the study of calculus. It begins with a review of the coordinate plane, linear equations, and inequalities, and moves purposefully into the study of functions. Students will explore the nature of graphs and deepen their understanding of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and will be introduced to complex numbers, parametric equations, and the difference quotient.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Kumar, Aditya
Class Schedule
Monday
1:00 PM-3:30 PM
Tuesday
1:00 PM-3:30 PM
Wednesday
1:00 PM-3:30 PM
Thursday
1:00 PM-3:30 PM

Social Inequality and the Public's Health - AS.280.140

Pre-College students June 24 - July 4 Homewood Campus
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In epidemiology, public health scientists use quantitative and analytic tools examine to the distribution of disease across the population and to identify the various factors that shape these patterns. This course will explore how epidemiologic tools can be used to interrogate the social and structural factors that create health disparities in society. Students will learn about key social determinants of health (including class, race, and gender), the various pathways by which social experiences “get under the skin” to impact physiologic disease states, and how epidemiologists investigate these processes through population-based research. Students will leave the course with an understanding of the ways public health professionals and community members alike can use this public health research to develop policies and programs that protect the health of vulnerable groups and reduce inequality.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Public Health Studies
Instructor
Qureshi, Farah
Class Schedule
Monday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM-4:00 PM

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