The 2024 Pre-College Programs are available during these two-week sessions:
• Session One (June 24-July 4)
• Session Two (July 8-July 18)
• Session Three (July 21-August 4)

Filter your search to customize your view into the catalog. Qualified pre-college students may also consider the online undergraduate courses listed below.

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Results for: Pre-College students

Elementary Number Theory - AS.110.304

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

The student is provided with many historical examples of topics, each of which serves as an illustration of and provides a background for many years of current research in number theory. Primes and prime factorization, congruences, Euler's function, quadratic reciprocity, primitive roots, solutions to polynomial congruences (Chevalley's theorem), Diophantine equations including the Pythagorean and Pell equations, Gaussian integers, Dirichlet's theorem on primes.

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in AS.110.201 (Linear Algebra) or AS.110.212 (Honors Linear Algebra).

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Marshburn, Nicholas

Elements of Macroeconomics - AS.180.101

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course introduces the basic tools of macroeconomics and teaches how they are applied to real world economic policy. Throughout the course, the main goals will be to a) study economic aggregates such as the overall price level, the unemployment rate, and the GDP, and b) understand how they relate to each other. Attention will be given to fiscal and monetary policies. We will also analyze the recent COVID crisis and its impact on the economic activity.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Economics
Instructor
Kodua, Nino

Elements of Microeconomics - AS.180.102

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Economics
Instructor
Zheng, Xudong

Epidemics, Pandemics, and Outbreaks - AS.360.146

Pre-College students July 8 - July 19 Online
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In the midst of a global pandemic that has shifted the ways in which we move, work, and interact with others around the world, it is more important than ever to have a deeper understanding of how outbreaks, epidemics, and pandemics have evolved. You will review select communicable (COVID-19, Ebola, Zika, and HIV) and non-communicable (diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, injury, and mental health) diseases in public health around the world. Examine the global burden of these diseases and the various forms of prevention efforts undertaken by global and national organizations. This program will use a combination of lecture, discussion, and student presentation format to encourage broad participation.

This self-paced program is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for your important program deadlines.

Prerequisite: There are no prerequisites for this program.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and video resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Interdepartmental
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-paced
Tuesday
Self-paced
Wednesday
Self-paced
Thursday
Self-paced
Friday
Self-paced

Financial Accounting - EN.660.203

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

The course in Financial Accounting is designed for anyone who could be called upon to analyze and/or communicate financial results and/or make effective financial decisions in a for-profit business setting. No prior accounting knowledge or skill is required for successful completion of this course. Because accounting is described as the language of business, this course emphasizes the vocabulary, methods, and processes by which all business transactions are communicated. The accounting cycle, basic business transactions, internal controls, and preparation and understanding of financial statements including balance sheets, statements of income and cash flows are covered. No audits.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
10 weeks
Area of Study
Department
EN Center for Leadership Education
Instructor
Aronhime, Lawrence

Foundations of American Enterprise - EN.660.105

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Formerly Introduction to Business, this course is designed as an overview comprising three broad categories: the economic, financial, and corporate context of business activities; the organization and management of business enterprises; and, the marketing and production of goods and services. Topic specific readings, short case studies and financial exercises all focus on the bases for managerial decisions as well as the long and short-term implications of those decisions in a global environment. No audits.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
10 weeks
Area of Study
Department
EN Center for Leadership Education
Instructor
Aronhime, Lawrence

General Biology I - AS.020.151

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course is an introduction to biology from an evolutionary, molecular, and cellular perspective. Specific topics and themes include evolutionary theory, the structure and function of biological molecules, mechanisms of harvesting energy, cell division, classical genetics, and gene expression. This section will involve in-class problem solving and the use of assigned pre-class videos and questions.

Prerequisite: AP Biology.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology

General Biology II - AS.020.152

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course builds on the concepts presented and discussed in General Biology I. The primary foci of this course will be on the diversity of life and on the anatomy, physiology, and evolution of plants and animals. There will be a special emphasis on human biology.

Prerequisite: AP Biology.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology

Honors Algebra II - AS.110.412

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This is a continuation of 110.411 Honors Algebra I. Topics studies include principal ideal domains, structure of finitely generated modules over them. Introduction to field theory. Linear algebra over a field. Field extensions, constructible polygons, non-trisectability. Splitting field of a polynomial, algebraic closure of a field. Galois theory: correspondence between subgroups and subfields. Solvability of polynomial equations by radicals.

Prerequisite: C- or better in AS.110.411 (Honors Algebra I) or equivalent.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics

Intermediate Programming - EN.601.220

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course teaches intermediate to advanced programming, using C and C++. (Prior knowledge of these languages is not expected.) We will cover low-level programming techniques, as well as object-oriented class design, and the use of class libraries. Specific topics include pointers, dynamic memory allocation, polymorphism, overloading, inheritance, templates, collections, exceptions, and others as time permits. Students are expected to learn syntax and some language specific features independently. Course work involves significant programming projects in both languages.

Prerequisite: EN.500.132 (Bootcamp: Java) OR EN.500.133 (Bootcamp: Python) OR EN.500.134 (Bootcamp: MATLAB); OR C+ or better in EN.500.112 (Gateway Computing: Java) or EN.500.113 (Gateway Computing: Python) or EN.500.114 (Gateway Computing MATLAB); OR AP Computer Science or equivalent.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
EN Computer Science
Instructor
Barragan, Juan Antonio
Class Schedule
Monday
10:00 AM-12:15 PM
Wednesday
10:00 AM-12:15 PM
Friday
10:00 AM-12:15 PM

Intermediate Spanish I - AS.210.211

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish I is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained an advanced elementary level in the language. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish I will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Intermediate Spanish II).There is no final exam. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 (Spanish Elements II) or appropriate Spanish placement exam score.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Intermediate Spanish I - AS.210.211

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish I is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained an advanced elementary level in the language. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish I will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Intermediate Spanish II).There is no final exam. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 (Spanish Elements II) or appropriate Spanish placement exam score.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Intermediate Spanish II - AS.210.212

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish II is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained a mid-intermediate level in the language or who have completed Spanish 212. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish II will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Advanced Spanish I). There is no final exam. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. 

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 (Spanish Elements II) or appropriate Spanish placement exam score.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Intermediate Spanish II - AS.210.212

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish II is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained a mid-intermediate level in the language or who have completed Spanish 212. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish II will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Advanced Spanish I). There is no final exam. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 (Spanish Elements II) or appropriate Spanish placement exam score.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Introduction to Abstract Algebra - AS.110.401

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An introduction to the basic notions of modern abstract algebra and can serve as as Introduction to Proofs (IP) course. This course is an introduction to group theory, with an emphasis on concrete examples, and especially on geometric symmetry groups. The course will introduce basic notions (groups, subgroups, homomorphisms, quotients) and prove foundational results (Lagrange's theorem, Cauchy's theorem, orbit-counting techniques, the classification of finite abelian groups). Examples to be discussed include permutation groups, dihedral groups, matrix groups, and finite rotation groups, culminating in the classification of the wallpaper groups.

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in AS.110.201 (Linear Algebra) or AS.110.212 (Honors Linear Algebra).

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Marshburn, Nicholas

Introduction to Data Analysis - AS.110.125

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This online course introduces students to important concepts in data analytics across a wide range of case studies. Students will learn how to gather, analyze, and interpret data to drive strategic and operational success. They will explore how to clean and organize data for analysis, and how to perform calculations using Microsoft Excel. Topics include the data science lifecycle, probability, statistics, hypothesis testing, set theory, graphing, regression, and data ethics.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Gaines, Alexa

Introduction to Financial Mathematics - AS.110.276

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course is designed to develop students' understanding of fundamental concepts of financial mathematics.  The course will cover mathematical theory and applications including the time value of money, annuities and cash flows, bond pricing, loans, amortization, stock and portfolio pricing, immunization of portfolios, swaps and determinants of interest rates, asset matching and convexity.  A basic knowledge of calculus and an introductory knowledge of probability is assumed.

Prerequisite: Calculus I or equivalent.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Nichols, Bradford

Introduction to Mathematical Cryptography - AS.110.375

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An Introduction to Mathematical Cryptography is an introduction to modern cryptography with an emphasis on the mathematics behind the theory of public key cryptosystems and digital signature schemes. The course develops the mathematical tools needed for the construction and security analysis of diverse cryptosystems. Other topics central to mathematical cryptography covered are classical cryptographic constructions, such as Diffie-Hellmann key exchange, discrete logarithm-based cryptosystems, the RSA cryptosystem, and digital signatures. Fundamental mathematical tools for cryptography studied include primality testing, factorization algorithms, probability theory, information theory, and collision algorithms. A survey of important recent cryptographic innovations, such as elliptic curves, elliptic curve and pairing-based cryptography are included as well. This course is an ideal introduction for mathematics and computer science students to the mathematical foundations of modern cryptography.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Ross, Lauren

Introduction to Medical and Mental Health Interpreting - AS.211.259

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course is a broad introduction to the fields of medical and mental health interpreting. Modules will include: (1) Three-way communication: managing role expectations and interpersonal dynamics; (2) Basic interpreting skills and techniques in a healthcare setting; (3) Ethical principles, dilemmas, and confidentiality; (4) Elements of medical interpreting; (5) Elements of mental health interpreting; (6) Trauma-informed interpreting: serving the refugee population. The course is taught in English, and has no foreign language pre-requisites.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor has scheduled a regular synchronous session each Monday from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM, and may schedule additional live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Zannirato, Alessandro
Class Schedule
Monday
10:00 AM-12:00 PM

Introduction to Neuroplasticity and Neurology - AS.080.119

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Recent scientific evidence shows that our brain has a great deal of malleability at any age and that our lifestyle choices play an important role in shrinking or growing different parts of our brain. Factors such as poor sleep, obesity, anxiety, and poor diet lead to accumulating shrinkage in the brain while even three months of exercise, brain training, meditation, and optimal sleep can grow the brain. You can learn to apply these new discoveries into your day-to-day life in order to improve your memory, attention, organizational skills, and overall brain vitality. Much of your learning in this course will happen during classes. Each lecture is followed by a 10-minute engaging and fun discussion session to make sure you have grasped the main concepts for that presentation.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Neuroscience
Instructor
Fotuhi, Majid
Class Schedule
Monday
10:00AM-12:30PM
Wednesday
10:00AM-12:30PM
Friday
10:00AM-12:30PM

Introduction to Neuroscience - AS.080.105

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 20 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course will provide a fundamental understanding of the mammalian nervous system, with an emphasis on how molecules, cells, circuits, and systems in the brain work to promote behavior and cognition. Topics covered in this course include the function of nerve cells, signaling between brain networks, basic neuroanatomy, and the neural bases of movement, sensation, and memory. This course is designed for any student who has an interest in the range of disciplines we call neuroscience.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
6 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Neuroscience
Instructor
Trageser, Jason

Introduction to Political Theory: Power and Authority (W) - AS.190.181

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 20 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course provides an introduction to Western political theory, focusing on theories and practices of power and authority. We will examine the extent to which it is possible to describe, theorize, and make visible how political power operates, and power's relationship to authority, knowledge, truth, and political freedom. A strong tradition of political thought argues that people's consent is what makes political power legitimate. But what if one of the most insidious workings of power is its ability to prevent us from telling the difference between consent and coercion? Can power allow certain authorities to effectively brainwash people? If so, does that mean that those who obey authority should no longer be held politically responsible for their actions? Does the coercive power of norms and conformity prevent any robust practice of freedom? What role (if any) should state power play in negotiating questions of morality, religion, and sexuality? Lastly, we will be haunted by a related question: can political theories of power make people free, or are those theories implicated in the very coercion they profess to oppose? Classes will be a combination of lectures, critical discussions/debates, film screenings and presentations. Throughout the term, you will sharpen your ability to formulate coherent written and spoken arguments by organizing and supporting your thoughts in a persuasive manner. An important part of this skill will include the ability to wrestle with complex and controversial political problems that lack any single answer. The stakes of these problems will be brought to life by the political examples we will study and made legible by looking through the theoretical lenses of diverse thinkers.

A writing-intensive course (W) engages students in multiple writing projects, ranging from traditional papers to a wide variety of other forms, distributed throughout the term. Assignments include a mix of high and low stakes writing, meaning that students have the chance to write in informal, low-pressure--even ungraded--contexts, as well as producing larger, more formal writing assignments. Students engage in writing in the classroom through variety of means, including class discussions, workshop, faculty/TA lectures, and class materials (for instance, strong and weak examples of the assigned genre). Expectations are clearly conveyed through assignment descriptions, including the genre and audience of the assigned writing, and evaluative criteria. Students receive feedback on their writing, in written and/or verbal form, from faculty, TAs, and/or peers. Students have at least one opportunity to revise.

Duration
6 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Political Science
Instructor
Brendese, Philip
Class Schedule
Monday
1:00PM-3:20 PM
Tuesday
1:00PM-3:20 PM
Wednesday
1:00PM-3:20 PM

Introduction to Probability - AS.110.275

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course follows the actuarial Exam P syllabus and learning objectives to prepare students to pass the SOA/CAS Probability Exam. Topics include axioms of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, conditional probability, Bayes’ theorem, Chebyshev's Theorem, Central Limit Theorem, univariate and joint distributions and expectations, loss frequency, loss severity and other risk management concepts. Exam P learning objectives and learning outcomes are emphasized.

Prerequisite: Calculus II.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Marshburn, Nicholas

Introduction to Proofs - AS.110.301

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course will provide a practical introduction to mathematical proofs with the aim of developing fluency in the language of mathematics, which itself is often described as “the language of the universe.” Along with a library of proof techniques, we shall tour propositional logic, set theory, cardinal arithmetic, and metric topology and explore “proof relevant” mathematics by interacting with a computer proof assistant. This course on the construction of mathematical proof will conclude with a deconstruction of mathematical proof, interrogating the extent to which proof serves as a means to discover universal truths and assessing the mechanisms by which the mathematical community achieves consensus regarding whether a claimed result has been proven.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics

Introduction to Psychology - AS.200.101

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Do we all see colors the same way? How did so many "good" people support the Nazi party? Do crossword puzzles really stave off Alzheimer's Disease? This course tries to answer these questions and many others, providing a comprehensive overview of the scientific study of the mind. We'll explore topics such as perception, language, memory, decision-making, creativity, love, sex, art, politics, religion, dreams, drugs, brain damage and mental illness, grappling with deep and long-standing controversies along the way: differences between the sexes, the relationship between mind and brain, causes and consequences of racism, human uniqueness (or not) within the animal kingdom, nature vs. nurture, good and evil, consciousness. Appropriate for anyone wanting to know who and what we are as human beings (or who noticed that psychology is now on the MCAT).

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Psychological & Brain Sciences
Instructor
Selterman, Dylan

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