Need more flexibility to fit your coursework into your life? With Summer Term's online courses, you can work—or say “yes” to your dream internship—and still continue to pace yourself on the path to graduation.

Filter your search to find the class you need or to explore a new interest. Some undergraduate courses are also available to qualified pre-college students.

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Data Analytics Workshop - AS.110.100

Pre-College students July 22 - August 2 Online
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In this two-week pre-college program, students work in groups to construct and present a data analysis project which collects, organizes, cleanses, and visualizes a dataset of their choosing. Topics include exploratory data analysis, data visualization, probability distributions, data scraping and cleansing, the basics of hypothesis testing, and regression modeling. Students will primarily use Microsoft Excel. Programs like Octave (Matlab), and Octoparse, will also be introduced to help students learn the basics of data analytics. 

This self-paced program is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for your important program deadlines.

Prerequisite: Precalculus. (There is no programming requisite required for this course.)

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Zoll, Aaron
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-paced
Tuesday
Self-paced
Wednesday
Self-paced
Thursday
Self-paced
Friday
Self-paced

Developmental Genetics Lab - AS.020.340

Undergraduate students May 20 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

CRISPR (clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeat) is one of the greatest advances in biology in the past decade, providing researchers with the tools to precisely and affordably edit genomes and physicians a new tool to cure disease. However, the ability to edit plant and animal genomes, including human genomes, comes with significant ethical considerations. This course will utilize a hybrid classroom-laboratory approach to provide students with both a comprehensive knowledge of the CRISPR system and a deeper understanding of how gene function is studied. At the end of the course, you will not only understand how CRISPR works, but also have a better understanding of the power of genetics to illuminate molecular mechanisms of protein function.

Prerequisites: AS.020.303 (Genetics) must be taken prior to or during enrollment in the Developmental Genetics Lab. Students must have completed Lab Safety training prior to registering for this class. To access the tutorial, login to myLearning and enter 458083 in the Search box to locate the appropriate module.

Duration
6 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology
Instructor
Norris, Carolyn
Class Schedule
Monday
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
Wednesday
1:00 PM-5:00 PM
Friday
1:00 PM-5:00 PM

Differential Equations with Applications - AS.110.302

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This is a course in ordinary differential equations (ODEs), equations involving an unknown function of one independent variable and some of its derivatives, and is primarily a course in the study of the structure of and techniques for solving ODEs as mathematical models. Specific topics include first and second ODEs of various types, systems of linear differential equations, autonomous systems, and the qualitative and quantitative analysis of nonlinear systems of first-order ODEs. Laplace transforms, series solutions and the basics of numerical solutions are included as extra topics.

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in AS.110.107 (Calculus II For Biological and Social Science) or AS.110.109 (Calculus II For Physical Sciences and Engineering) OR AS.110.113 (Honors Single Variable Calculus) or a 5 on the AP BC exam.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Marshburn, Nicholas

Elementary Number Theory - AS.110.304

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

The student is provided with many historical examples of topics, each of which serves as an illustration of and provides a background for many years of current research in number theory. Primes and prime factorization, congruences, Euler's function, quadratic reciprocity, primitive roots, solutions to polynomial congruences (Chevalley's theorem), Diophantine equations including the Pythagorean and Pell equations, Gaussian integers, Dirichlet's theorem on primes.

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in AS.110.201 (Linear Algebra) or AS.110.212 (Honors Linear Algebra).

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Marshburn, Nicholas

Elements of Macroeconomics - AS.180.101

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course introduces the basic tools of macroeconomics and teaches how they are applied to real world economic policy. Throughout the course, the main goals will be to a) study economic aggregates such as the overall price level, the unemployment rate, and the GDP, and b) understand how they relate to each other. Attention will be given to fiscal and monetary policies. We will also analyze the recent COVID crisis and its impact on the economic activity.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Economics
Instructor
Kodua, Nino

Elements of Microeconomics - AS.180.102

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An introduction to the economic system and economic analysis with emphasis on demand and supply, relative prices, the allocation of resources, and the distribution of goods and services, theory of consumer behavior, theory of the firm, and competition and monopoly, including the application of microeconomic analysis to contemporary problems.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Economics
Instructor
Zheng, Xudong

Epidemics, Pandemics, and Outbreaks - AS.360.146

Pre-College students July 8 - July 19 Online
1 Credit Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

In the midst of a global pandemic that has shifted the ways in which we move, work, and interact with others around the world, it is more important than ever to have a deeper understanding of how outbreaks, epidemics, and pandemics have evolved. You will review select communicable (COVID-19, Ebola, Zika, and HIV) and non-communicable (diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, injury, and mental health) diseases in public health around the world. Examine the global burden of these diseases and the various forms of prevention efforts undertaken by global and national organizations. This program will use a combination of lecture, discussion, and student presentation format to encourage broad participation.

This self-paced program is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for your important program deadlines.

Prerequisite: There are no prerequisites for this program.

Required Text: There are no required textbooks for this program; all readings and video resources will be made available to you throughout the program.

Duration
2 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Interdepartmental
Class Schedule
Monday
Self-paced
Tuesday
Self-paced
Wednesday
Self-paced
Thursday
Self-paced
Friday
Self-paced

Financial Accounting - EN.660.203

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

The course in Financial Accounting is designed for anyone who could be called upon to analyze and/or communicate financial results and/or make effective financial decisions in a for-profit business setting. No prior accounting knowledge or skill is required for successful completion of this course. Because accounting is described as the language of business, this course emphasizes the vocabulary, methods, and processes by which all business transactions are communicated. The accounting cycle, basic business transactions, internal controls, and preparation and understanding of financial statements including balance sheets, statements of income and cash flows are covered. No audits.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
10 weeks
Area of Study
Department
EN Center for Leadership Education
Instructor
Aronhime, Lawrence

Foundations of American Enterprise - EN.660.105

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Formerly Introduction to Business, this course is designed as an overview comprising three broad categories: the economic, financial, and corporate context of business activities; the organization and management of business enterprises; and, the marketing and production of goods and services. Topic specific readings, short case studies and financial exercises all focus on the bases for managerial decisions as well as the long and short-term implications of those decisions in a global environment. No audits.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
10 weeks
Area of Study
Department
EN Center for Leadership Education
Instructor
Aronhime, Lawrence

Full-Stack JavaScript - EN.601.280

Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

A full-stack JavaScript developer is a person who can build modern software applications using primarily the JavaScript programming language. Creating a modern software application involves integrating many technologies - from creating the user interface to saving information in a database and everything else in between and beyond. A full-stack developer is not an expert in everything. Rather, they are someone who is familiar with various (software application) frameworks and the ability to take a concept and turn it into a finished product. This course will teach you programming in JavaScript and introduce you to several JavaScript frameworks that would enable you to build modern web, cross-platform desktop, and native/hybrid mobile applications. A student who successfully completes this course will be on the expedited path to becoming a full-stack JavaScript developer.

Students may not have taken or be concurrently enrolled in EN.601.421 (Object Oriented Software Engineering) or EN.601.621 (Ojbect Oriented Software Engineering--graduate degree version).

Prerequisites: EN.601.220 (Intermediate Programming) OR EN.601.226 (Data Structures).

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
EN Computer Science
Instructor
Madooei, Ali
Class Schedule
Monday
2:00 PM-3:40 PM
Wednesday
2:00 PM-3:40 PM
Friday
2:00 PM-3:40 PM

General Biology I - AS.020.151

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course is an introduction to biology from an evolutionary, molecular, and cellular perspective. Specific topics and themes include evolutionary theory, the structure and function of biological molecules, mechanisms of harvesting energy, cell division, classical genetics, and gene expression. This section will involve in-class problem solving and the use of assigned pre-class videos and questions.

Prerequisite: AP Biology.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology

General Biology II - AS.020.152

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course builds on the concepts presented and discussed in General Biology I. The primary foci of this course will be on the diversity of life and on the anatomy, physiology, and evolution of plants and animals. There will be a special emphasis on human biology.

Prerequisite: AP Biology.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Biology

Honors Algebra II - AS.110.412

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This is a continuation of 110.411 Honors Algebra I. Topics studies include principal ideal domains, structure of finitely generated modules over them. Introduction to field theory. Linear algebra over a field. Field extensions, constructible polygons, non-trisectability. Splitting field of a polynomial, algebraic closure of a field. Galois theory: correspondence between subgroups and subfields. Solvability of polynomial equations by radicals.

Prerequisite: C- or better in AS.110.411 (Honors Algebra I) or equivalent.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics

Intermediate Programming - EN.601.220

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course teaches intermediate to advanced programming, using C and C++. (Prior knowledge of these languages is not expected.) We will cover low-level programming techniques, as well as object-oriented class design, and the use of class libraries. Specific topics include pointers, dynamic memory allocation, polymorphism, overloading, inheritance, templates, collections, exceptions, and others as time permits. Students are expected to learn syntax and some language specific features independently. Course work involves significant programming projects in both languages.

Prerequisite: EN.500.132 (Bootcamp: Java) OR EN.500.133 (Bootcamp: Python) OR EN.500.134 (Bootcamp: MATLAB); OR C+ or better in EN.500.112 (Gateway Computing: Java) or EN.500.113 (Gateway Computing: Python) or EN.500.114 (Gateway Computing MATLAB); OR AP Computer Science or equivalent.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
EN Computer Science
Instructor
Barragan, Juan Antonio
Class Schedule
Monday
10:00 AM-12:15 PM
Wednesday
10:00 AM-12:15 PM
Friday
10:00 AM-12:15 PM

Intermediate Spanish I - AS.210.211

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish I is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained an advanced elementary level in the language. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish I will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Intermediate Spanish II).There is no final exam. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 (Spanish Elements II) or appropriate Spanish placement exam score.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Intermediate Spanish I - AS.210.211

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish I is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained an advanced elementary level in the language. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish I will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Intermediate Spanish II).There is no final exam. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. No new enrollments permitted after the third class session.

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 (Spanish Elements II) or appropriate Spanish placement exam score.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Intermediate Spanish II - AS.210.212

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students May 28 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish II is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained a mid-intermediate level in the language or who have completed Spanish 212. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish II will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Advanced Spanish I). There is no final exam. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. 

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 (Spanish Elements II) or appropriate Spanish placement exam score.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Intermediate Spanish II - AS.210.212

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

Intermediate Spanish II is a comprehensive study of Spanish designed for students who have attained a mid-intermediate level in the language or who have completed Spanish 212. The course is organized around a thematic approach to topics relevant to contemporary Hispanic culture. Students will practice the four language skills in the classroom through guided grammatical and creative conversational activities and through the completion of three comprehensive exams. Outside of class, students will complete extensive online assignments and write three major compositions (as part of the three exams). In addition, students will broaden their knowledge of Hispanic culture by viewing a Spanish-language film and by reading several literary selections. Successful completion of Intermediate Spanish II will prepare students for the next level of Spanish (Advanced Spanish I). There is no final exam. May not be taken Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

Prerequisite: AS.210.112 (Spanish Elements II) or appropriate Spanish placement exam score.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Sanchez, Loreto

Introduction to Abstract Algebra - AS.110.401

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An introduction to the basic notions of modern abstract algebra and can serve as as Introduction to Proofs (IP) course. This course is an introduction to group theory, with an emphasis on concrete examples, and especially on geometric symmetry groups. The course will introduce basic notions (groups, subgroups, homomorphisms, quotients) and prove foundational results (Lagrange's theorem, Cauchy's theorem, orbit-counting techniques, the classification of finite abelian groups). Examples to be discussed include permutation groups, dihedral groups, matrix groups, and finite rotation groups, culminating in the classification of the wallpaper groups.

Prerequisite: Grade of C- or better in AS.110.201 (Linear Algebra) or AS.110.212 (Honors Linear Algebra).

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Marshburn, Nicholas

Introduction to Data Analysis - AS.110.125

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This online course introduces students to important concepts in data analytics across a wide range of case studies. Students will learn how to gather, analyze, and interpret data to drive strategic and operational success. They will explore how to clean and organize data for analysis, and how to perform calculations using Microsoft Excel. Topics include the data science lifecycle, probability, statistics, hypothesis testing, set theory, graphing, regression, and data ethics.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Gaines, Alexa

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I (W) - AS.220.105

Undergraduate students May 20 - June 28 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An introduction to basic strategies in the writing of poetry and fiction, with readings by Joyce, Woolf, Baldwin, Munro, Garcia Marquez, Donne, Bishop, Yeats, Komunyakaa, Tretheway, and others. Students will learn the elements of the short story and try their hand at a variety of forms: realist, fantastical, experimental. They’ll also study the basic poetic forms and meters, from the ballad to the sonnet, iambic pentameter to free verse. Students will compose short stories and poems and workshop them in class. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses. This course is part one of the year-long Introduction to Fiction and Poetry, and must be taken before AS.220.106.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

A writing-intensive course (W) engages students in multiple writing projects, ranging from traditional papers to a wide variety of other forms, distributed throughout the term. Assignments include a mix of high and low stakes writing, meaning that students have the chance to write in informal, low-pressure--even ungraded--contexts, as well as producing larger, more formal writing assignments. Students engage in writing in the classroom through variety of means, including class discussions, workshop, faculty/TA lectures, and class materials (for instance, strong and weak examples of the assigned genre). Expectations are clearly conveyed through assignment descriptions, including the genre and audience of the assigned writing, and evaluative criteria. Students receive feedback on their writing, in written and/or verbal form, from faculty, TAs, and/or peers. Students have at least one opportunity to revise.

Duration
6 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Writing Seminars

Introduction to Fiction & Poetry II (W) - AS.220.106

Undergraduate students July 1 - August 9 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

The second half of IFP, this course delves deeper into the finer points of fiction writing, including tone, description, and point of view; students will also enrich their knowledge of poetic forms and devices, such as figurative language, verse rhythm, and the poetic line. Readings include work by Paley, Mahfouz, Calvino, Lessing, Richard Wright, Plath, Rich, Auden, Li-Young Lee, and others. Students will write and workshop their own stories and poems, and complete a final portfolio. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

Prerequisites: AS 220.105 (Introduction to Fiction & Poetry I).

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor may schedule live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

A writing-intensive course (W) engages students in multiple writing projects, ranging from traditional papers to a wide variety of other forms, distributed throughout the term. Assignments include a mix of high and low stakes writing, meaning that students have the chance to write in informal, low-pressure--even ungraded--contexts, as well as producing larger, more formal writing assignments. Students engage in writing in the classroom through variety of means, including class discussions, workshop, faculty/TA lectures, and class materials (for instance, strong and weak examples of the assigned genre). Expectations are clearly conveyed through assignment descriptions, including the genre and audience of the assigned writing, and evaluative criteria. Students receive feedback on their writing, in written and/or verbal form, from faculty, TAs, and/or peers. Students have at least one opportunity to revise.

Duration
6 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Writing Seminars
Instructor
Keleher, Kate

Introduction to Financial Mathematics - AS.110.276

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course is designed to develop students' understanding of fundamental concepts of financial mathematics.  The course will cover mathematical theory and applications including the time value of money, annuities and cash flows, bond pricing, loans, amortization, stock and portfolio pricing, immunization of portfolios, swaps and determinants of interest rates, asset matching and convexity.  A basic knowledge of calculus and an introductory knowledge of probability is assumed.

Prerequisite: Calculus I or equivalent.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Nichols, Bradford

Introduction to Mathematical Cryptography - AS.110.375

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students June 3 - July 26 Online
4 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

An Introduction to Mathematical Cryptography is an introduction to modern cryptography with an emphasis on the mathematics behind the theory of public key cryptosystems and digital signature schemes. The course develops the mathematical tools needed for the construction and security analysis of diverse cryptosystems. Other topics central to mathematical cryptography covered are classical cryptographic constructions, such as Diffie-Hellmann key exchange, discrete logarithm-based cryptosystems, the RSA cryptosystem, and digital signatures. Fundamental mathematical tools for cryptography studied include primality testing, factorization algorithms, probability theory, information theory, and collision algorithms. A survey of important recent cryptographic innovations, such as elliptic curves, elliptic curve and pairing-based cryptography are included as well. This course is an ideal introduction for mathematics and computer science students to the mathematical foundations of modern cryptography.

A flexible weekly schedule accommodates all student schedules and time zones, and courses include pre-recorded lectures, notes, and interactives to help students learn the material. Assessments include computer-scored items for immediate feedback as well as instructor-graded assignments for personalized learning. Students have access to instructors through email or individual reviews, and weekly instructor-led synchronous problem-solving sessions are recorded for viewing at any time. Students should expect to work a minimum of 5-10 hours per week.

Duration
8 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Mathematics
Instructor
Ross, Lauren

Introduction to Medical and Mental Health Interpreting - AS.211.259

Pre-College students & Undergraduate students July 1 - August 2 Online
3 Credits Status: Open Save this Course View Saved Courses

This course is a broad introduction to the fields of medical and mental health interpreting. Modules will include: (1) Three-way communication: managing role expectations and interpersonal dynamics; (2) Basic interpreting skills and techniques in a healthcare setting; (3) Ethical principles, dilemmas, and confidentiality; (4) Elements of medical interpreting; (5) Elements of mental health interpreting; (6) Trauma-informed interpreting: serving the refugee population. The course is taught in English, and has no foreign language pre-requisites.

This online course is primarily delivered asynchronously; however, your instructor has scheduled a regular synchronous session each Monday from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM, and may schedule additional live interactions as well. Please refer to your syllabus for these opportunities and for important course deadlines.

Duration
5 weeks
Area of Study
Department
Modern Languages and Literatures
Instructor
Zannirato, Alessandro
Class Schedule
Monday
10:00 AM-12:00 PM

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